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April 18, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1961

THE MICHIG~AN UIAIV

InaA"V"

TUESAYAPRL 18 191 ta a £a Ll,,aj

PAGE FT W

LIBERAL IDEAS:
Guftein Discusses Significance of Islam Society's Fall,

I7

By GAIL EVANS

The fall of Medieval Islam so-
ciety could be a warning to us,
S. D. Guitein, University of Penn-
sylvania professor of Arabic, said.
Islam society embraced liberal
ideas similar to ours and that so-

material for his proposition. His
recent find in the Cairo geniza
has given researchers new insight
into the culture of Islamic society,
950-1250 A.D.
Explains Geniza
"A geniza is the opposite. of an;
archive," Prof. Gultein said, "an+
archive is orderly; whereas, the
material in a geniza is just thrown
into the chamber when it is no
longer wanted."
Specimens of letters written in
Arabic "give us an idea of life in
those times," Prof. Guitein added.
They not only show the style of
writing actually used, but they re-
veal issues of concern to the elev-
enth century Moslem. The expert
on oriental studies said that he
believed the Geniza papers to be
representative because Islam so-
ciety was open and fluid.
"Islamic' society was mainly ur-
Students To Hold
Congo Discussion
Four University students from
Africa will debate "Is the Congo
Crisis Contagious?" at 7:30 to-
night in Rm. 3-S of the Michigan
Union.
Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
Arbor) who formerly was a United
States Information officer in the
Congo, will moderate the panel
discussion.

ban and not agricultural," he said.
The society was comprised of a
middle class bourgeoisie similar to
that of seventeenth century Eng-
land.
Though they held liberal ideas,
they failed to reform and conquer
the Islamic state.
Negative Attitude
The reasons Guitein cited for
this failure was that the people
had a negative attitude toward
the government and preferred to
keep aloof. "They did not strive
for political power as did the Eng-
lish middle class," he explained.
Basically there were two main
City ToCast
School Votes
Ann Arbor officials estimateI
some 7,000 voters will visit the
polls today to decide two school
proposals.
The first item on the ballot is
the $2.5 million dollar bond pro-
posal for school buildings and
sites. The other is for renewal of
the three-mill extra operation tax'
for a 10-year period. This tax ex-
pired in December.
All registered voters may vote
on the millage, but only property
owners may vote on the bond
issue, since they would be assessed
for the taxes.

PROFESSOR -GUITEIN
. discusses Islam

ciety was destroyed. Might not ours
come to the same end, he asked?
Prof.Guitein's study of the cen-
ter of medieval society centering,
in Spain, Tunisia, Egypt, and
Syria provided the background

levels in Medieval Islam society-
high bourgeois and laborer. Peas-
ants were outside society. Class
consciousness and social inequal-
ity prevailed according to Prof.
Guitein.
The class structure can be brok-
en down into six layers: The up-
per level, he said, consisted of gov-
ernment officials, doctors, and
scholarly wealthy businessmen.
The second level was composed
of uneducated wealthy business-
men. Small businessmen were next
on the social scale.
Then came craftsmen and arti-
sans who were highly specialized.
Farmers and villagers made up
the fifth level.
Finally came the slaves who
were confidants and personal
servants to their lord.
Challenge Sets
Student Talks
Registration for Challenge sem-
inars on American foreign policy
toward emerging nations will be
open from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.
today in the Fishbowl.
The seminars are part of the
Challenge colloquium being held
this week. At 4 p.m. Thursday,
Theodore Ntoampe, a student
from Basutoland will speak on
"Goals of American Foreign Policy
in Africa" in Rm. 3Y of the Mich-
igan Union.
The same afternoon, Prof. Zafar
Islam, visiting history lecturer,
will lead a seminar on "Policy To-
ward Emerging Pakistan," in Rm.
3F of the Union.
Prof. Robert Carroll of the so-
ciology department will present a
seminar on "Foreign Policy and
Social Change" at 4 p.m. Thurs-
day in the Honors Lounge, Under-
graduate Library.
Prof. Russell Fifield of the po-
litical science department will lead
a seminar on policy in southeast
Asia at 4 p.m. Friday in Rm. 3Y
of the Union. At the same time,
Prof. Richard Park, also of the
political science department will
discuss policy in South Asia in
Rm. 3Z.
Briggs To Get
Annual Award
Robert P. Briggs, former Uni-
versity Vice-President of Business
and Finance, will receive the
fourth annual Business Learer-
ship Award of the business ad-
ministration school in ceremonies
May 12.
Briggs, who taught economics.
here for 14 years before becoming
vice-president, is currently presi-
dent fo the Michigan Chamber of
Commerce.

Jit To Lead
In Campus
Funmak ing
By DAVID GEIGER
Jit the Jester, symbol of this
year's Spring Weekend, will romp
through two days of fun, April 28-
29, during the campus-wide festi-
val called "Jest In Time."
Friday afternoon, the little fel-
low in his harlequin suit will lead
the parade of costumed house-
builders from the Diag to Palmer
Field. There men and women from
various campus housing units will
construct model buildings from
materials supplied at the site.
A large clock in the middle of
the model village will keep track
of the 60 minutes alloted for con-
struction time. "Hour Town" is
the name of the event.
While the buildings are being
judged a beauty contest will go
on. Some of the parade members
will model their period costumes.
Plan Skits
"Erred Era" is the theme for
Friday evening's skit night to be
held in Hill Auditorium. Five
housing units which have already
been selected will compete. The
skits will parody some historical
event by changing their time con-
text.
Saturday afternoon features
competitive events at Island Park.
Again housing units will com-
pete in canoe races and partici-
pants will vie for prizes for their
costumes in the event called
"Once Upon the Delaware."
"Porkers in Grease" is a tra-
ditional greased pig contest, and a
game in which contestants will
race to eat an ear of corn while
keeping the island's merry-go-
round moving is the afternoon's
final event.
Plan Entertainment
Sarah Vaughan will entertain
with two performances at the all-
campus dance which will climax
the weekend Saturday night. Dec-
orative booths will line the walls
of the Intramural' Sports Build-
ing picturing fabled entertain-
ment places from history. The
dance is called "Mirrored Mo-
ments."
Most of the campus housing
units will be participating in
Spring Weekend, general co-chair-
man Gary Roggin, '61, said. They
will compete under a cumulative
point system for some 20 trophies
Spring Weekend is a project of
the Women's Athletic Association
and the Michigan Union and was
officially started in 1953, although
a similar campus event had often
been held before.
A cart race and skit night made
up the first weekend and grad-
ually the dance and the Saturday
afternoon events were added.

FINEST
FINISHING
for your*
Dress Shirts

- ,,,
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MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
FOR SALE: Wilcox Gay Mono-Recorder,
Webcor Mono-record Stereo Play-
back-Viking 75 Stereo record and
playback. 57170 & 37481, X5
FOR SALE-Viking 85 RMQ stereo
quarter track tape recorder. Cost new
$375, asking $235. Call Jim at NO
2-7409. X12
A-i New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X1
FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY
All RCA Victor Records
at HALF PRICE
Grinnell's Big Store
downtown
Grinnell's
323 s. Main NO 2-5667
X14
PERSONAL
OPENINGS are now available for the
1961-62 planning committee for World
University Service. Interested people
should come to Lane Hall at 7:15 this
evening. P188
SARAH VAUGHAN sang for the Acad-
emy Awards last night. See her sing
for you in person at the SPRING
WEEKEND dance on April 29. Tickets
only $3.50 per couple. F191
If you're upset by midterms, freezing to
the bone from the cold April snow,
plagued by loads of papers, buy your-
self k ticket to SPRING WEEKEND.
F181
SPRING WEEKEND tickets on sale now
for Skit Nits and Dance, Tickets are
on sale at the Diag, Eng. Arch, and
Union, Monday-Friday from noon to
five. P190
WANTED: 2 Tickets for the Amsterdam
Orchestra Concert Sunday evening,
April 23. Call NO 2-2646. F186
To Gypsy, BLUE Rose from the piano
player. I'm BLUE over you. F183
LECTURE NOTES, individual lectures or
semester subscription. Office 304% S-.
State. F158
SENIORS: Order your graduation an-
nouncements now. On sale at the
Student Activities Building, March
22-31 and April 11-13. Sales from 1-5
each day except March 25 from 9-12.
Price is 12c each. F127
Join the DAILY and see the world -
through an Associated Press Teletype
Machine. F11
MISCELLANEOUS
THESIS TYPING in my home. Phone
NO 8-7718. M3
TAKE A BREAK!
For the largest hamburger
in town visit
SCHWABEN
INN
featuring
"The Poor Boy Sandwich"
215 Ashley
M5

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 1 1 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

LINES
2
3
4

I

I

I,

conveniently located--.
economy minded .. . home-like
comfort... that's why the Aller-
ton Hotel is Chicago headquar-
ters for many school groups,
business and professional stu-
dent affairs, field trips, athletic
teams, debate teams, speech
clinics, tours, etc.

PHOTO SUPPLIES
MOVIE CAMERA Canon ZM8, F14,
w/case. Trans. radio, 6&7 Tra. All
brand new. Bargain. Call NO 3-2684 or
leave message with NO 3-4288. B76
FOR RENT
SUMMER-sublet, completely furnished
one bedroom modern Arbordale Man-
or Apt. Including TV, air cond., dis-
posal, etc. $95. NO 3-4856. C77
TWO BEDROOM Furnished Apt. Three
or four persons. Very reasonable. NO
3-4402. C73
SOUTH STATE and Hill. Newly deco-
rated and furnished 2- and 3-room
apartments, $80-$100. NO 3-2800. C69
SUMMER apartment near campus. 3
furnished rooms and bath. $90 per
month. Call 3-0618 after 6 P.M. C68.
SUMMER modern two bedroom fur-
nished apartmet near campus and
both hospitals: disposal, parking,
other features. NO 3-6249. C76
FURNISHED 4 bedroom home, 1%'
baths, porch, secluded yard. Available
May 20-Sept. 10. $160 per month, less
for entire time. Car included. 3-8494.
C72
WANTED, working girl br part-time
student to share apartment close to
campus and hospital. Call NO 2-9731
evenings. C159
FOR RENT: 3 room apartment on cam-
pus. Will accommodate 3 men. Pri-
vate bath with shower, automatic
washer and dryer, private parking,
and one-room apartment. Call NO 5-
4767, or call N. Basement door, 1021
E. Huron St. between 9 and 5 daily.
C65
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
BUMPING, PAINTING, all kinds of auto
repairs. Free estimates. Call NO 5-4042
J. B. Auto Repair 318 N. First Street
S2
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
82
BIKES and SCOOTERS
FINEST USED SCOOTER in town. Per-
fect condition, has never needed re-
pairs. 1960 Cushman. Call Marsh at
NO 3-4211. Z34
1960 MOPED; Excellent condition, ex-
tras, $125 complete. NO 3-1022 before
8 p.m. Z35
BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$7.95; socks
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington
W1
BLONDE TABLES, Danish dining set
Haywood-Wakefield birch, Oriental
rugs, gentleman's desk, awaiting you
at the Treasure Mart, 529 Detroit, NO
2-1363. Open Mon. & Fri. nites 'til 9.
W1

I DAY
.80
.96
1.12

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

3 DAYS
2.00
2.40
2.80

6 DAYS
2.96
3.55
4.14

I

A j/S!

.-A

r'-

Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday
$12.00 plus 8c a mile. Rate$
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
* TRUCKS AVAILABLE

0

*BUSINESS SERVICES
From pencils to typewriters-
If you write, we have itI
MOR R ILL'S
314 South State St. NO 3-2481
"Giving Morrill support to students
for over 50 years."
J3
TYPING, quick efficient, 12 yr.expe-
rience. Call NO 3-9935. J15
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4647. J10
HOME LATE?
CUPBOARDS BARE?
You can shop at Ralph's 'til 12
midnight for all grocery supplies.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
"Just two doors from the Blue Front"
AA45
TRANSPORTATION

Laundered for Your Comfort
and Pleasure
KYER MODEL LAUNDRY.
& CLEANERS

815
601

South State
East Will oms

1023 East Ann
627 South Main

NO 3-4185
"SPECIALITS IN FABRIC CARE"

i

LUCKY

STRIKE

PRESENTS:

DR. PROOD'S THOUGHT FOR THE DAY: The best defense is a good offense, unless
you're weak or cowardly, in which case a good hiding place is unbeatable.

Organization
Notices
Congregational-Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Luncheon Discussion: "In
Defense of Theology," April 18, 12
Noon, 524 Thompson.
Women's Senate, Last Meeting, Instal-
lation of New Officers, Refreshments,
April 18, 4:15 p.m., League.
* * *
Wesley Fdn., Holy Communion fol-
lowed by breakfast (dismissed in time
for 8 o'clock classes), April 19, 7 a.m.,
ist Meth. Church Chapel.

al...:.. .* . .:::,...
----DEAR DR. FROOD: I am a sophomore majoring
in architecture. Our college has just completed
a magnificent carillon tower. Yesterday, while
Desaa. ROOD:atEsryhuya gloot hhnexamining the blueprints, I was horrified to dis.
he's Casanova. What should a girl do?
Chased cover that the tower will collapse at 3:30 P.M.,
June 3, 1964. I have taken my calculations to
DEAR CHASED: Ask each one to roll up his sleeve. If the dean, to the architects, to the builders, to
there is a small birthmark just above the left elbow, the president of the college. No one will pay any
you've got the real Casanova, attention to me. I am desperate. What can I do
..to avert disaster?
Frantic
DEAR FRANTIC: You've done your best, son. Now,
for your own peace of mind, won't you join me in
a short trip to Las Vegas to see what kind of
odds we can get?
..
DEAR DR. FROOD: I've been writing poems to a
certain girl for about five months. Yesterday I found
out that this girl and her friends get together to
read my poems and laugh at them. Do you think I
should stop writing to her?
DEAR DR. FROOD: A tackle on the football Upset
team likes the same girl I do. He says that if I
see her any more, he'll mop up the floor with me. DEAR UPSET: Definitely not.
I refuse to be intimidated! What should I do? There are all too few humor-
Ninety-nine Pounder ous poets writing today.
DEAR NINETY-NINE: You'd better let your hair

GI
HELP WANTED
DO YOU qualify? Neat, intelligent, am-
bitious. 3 college students needed to
work part time for top paying sales
promotions positions. Call NO 5-8958
for interview. H9
WANTED: Baby Sitter to live in year
round. Weekends and some evenings
free. References required. NO 2-9994
after 5:30 p.m. H33
USED CARS
PACKARD 1955, 2 door hard top, $200.
NO 3-1511, ext. 2953 8-5; NO 5-4017
after 6 p.m. , N22
'53 PLYMOUTH convertible. $225. Call
NO 3-4856 after 8 p.m. N21
1952 FORD, good running condition,
full tread tires, $80. NO 2-7816. N20
AUSTIN-HEALY, 1957, 100-6 Roadster 4
seater. Overdrive, metallic blue lac-
quer, silver wire wheels, black leather
interior, black top, tonneau, radio,
heater. Lucas fog lamps, sliding alum-
inum windows, complete tools, own-
er's manual. Like new. Owner school
teacher. $1,775. Lincoln 5-8614 Oak
Park (Detroit suburb). N18
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: 15 weeks (a full semester) of
interesting, newsy reading. This was
found on the Diag., Jan. 28. 1961 and
the owner is wanted desperately.
Please call NO 2-3241 for information
and fin da semester's DAILY sub-
scription as a reward (only $4.00 too).
Al
FOR SALE
'55 DODGE, 2 dr. hd top V-8, excellent
buy, $275. NO 2-2234. B39
BRAND NEW Royal typewriter, retails
$120, selling for $75. Won in contest.
NO 5-6341 after 10 p.m. or before 9
a.m. B40
THE BOOK CORNER, above. Treasure
Mart, 509 Detroit St. Open Fri. 6-9,
Sat. 9-5. "Any book anywhere." NO 2-
5941. K3
1957 SCHULT Mobile Home, 1 bedroom.
Calli1HU12-3532. B93,
INCOME HOUSE: by a student owner.
Gross income $300 per conth. Campus
location. Call NO 2-6094 evenings. B7
ONE HI. FI Record Player and 8" ex-
tension speaker for $75. 1 Bell tape
recorder for $100, both in good cond.
Call after 6 P.M. NO 3-7050. B31
FOR SALE-Small business. Ideal for
one, two college students. Can be
operated from space the size of a
work bench. Requires a few hours a
week. For further information-HU
3-3493. Cash, $250. B35
BUSINESS PERSONAL
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity, NO 8-8887. FF2
DISPOSING of part of my large library
at private sale. There are books on
every subject among thousands of
books collected for 65 years. Showings
at 617 Packard St. from 12 p.m. to 5
p.m. every day except Sunday. Rea-
sonable prices. FF1
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily
Classified Ads

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