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April 13, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ENDELIAN GENETICS:
Cell Interactions Fit Theory

By PHILIPSUTIN
Recent evidence that a cell's en-
vironment influences its develop-
:ment does not conflict with basic
Mendelian genetics, three Univer-
sity scientists agree.
'There is no controversy here,"
stated Prof. James Neel of the
medical school in commenting on
recent lectures of Profs. Tracy
Sonneborn of the University of
Indiana and Clemment Markert of
Johns Hopkins University.
Influence Development
In their lectures, the professors
indicated that the body of a cell
or neighboring cellsinfluence its
development.
Under the Mendelian genetic
theory, the genes control the
development of an individual in
each generation.
"The cytoplasm of a cell inter-
acts with the nucleus so that cer-
tain genes are activated in one
kind of tissue and other genes are
activated in a different tissue,"
Prof. Norman Kemp, of the zool-
ogy department, explained.
Wiped Ouit'
These changes fall within the
Mendelian theory because they are
usually wiped out in the next gen-
eration, Sally Allen, research
worker in the zoology department,
explained.
Unlike the theories of scientists
Jean Lamarck and T. D. Lysenko
which state that changes in the
cytoplasm will cause permanent
changes in the nucleus, these cyto-
plasmic interactions with nucleus
are not transmitted by the genes.
Embryonic Differentiation
Prof. Kemp noted that scientists
had believed that "all nuclei are
alike. Cytoplasmic differences ac-
count for embryonic differentia-
tion."
This belief was based on the
Fishbein Sees
'Serious' Lack
Of Physicians
The increased demand for medi-
cal services combined with the
population explosion should "bring
about a definite shortage of phy-
sicians and other trained medical
personnel" according to the new
Brittannica Book of the Year.
Within only a few years, the
number of applications for ad-
mission to medical schools has
fallen from six applicants for each
available position to only two.
However, it was estimated that an
additional 10 or 12 medical schools
would be needed by 1970 because
of the increase in population.
The shortage of applicants has
led some of the schools to lower
their admissions requirements.
Northwestern and John Hopkins
Universities have experimented
with a six year program leading
to an M.D. degree as opposed to
the present eight year program.
The article, entitled "Medicine,"
was written. by Dr. Morris Fish-
bein, medical author and editor.

1928 experiment of Hans Spemann
of Germany. He constricted the
two celled stage of an amphibian
embryo so that all genetic mater-
ial was in one of the cells.
When the one cell had divided
into 128 cells, he allowed a nu-
cleus of one of these cells to
pass through the constriction to
the undivided half. Upon the sep-
eration of the original halves, each
cell grew normally into a complete
embryo.
This seemed to indicate the nu-
cleus of the cell was fully re-
sponsible for its development, he
said.
Nucleus Changes
However, research by Profs.
Robert Briggs, of the University of
Indiana, and Thomas King, of
Lankenau Institute of Cancer Re-
search, indicated a change in the
nucleus during development.
Their experiment indicated that
"nuclei become different as devel-
opment proceeds. These changes
contribute to the unfolding pat-
tern of differentiation," Prof.
Kemp stated.-
Prof. Briggs and King removed
the female chromosomes from an
Group Prints
International
:Award Guide
The Institute of International
Education has published and re-
leased the "Handbook on Inter-
national Study," a guide to inter-
national scholarships.
The book is published in two
separate volumes, one "For For-
eign Nationals" and the second
"For UnitedkStates Nationals."
The books are designed as
sources of information on awards
and grants of major scholarship
programs, requirements for pro-
grams and government regulations
affecting the international stu-
dent.
Included is a listing of colleges
and universities in 91 countries as
well as the names and services of
organizations willing to help the
"exchangee" find living quarters
or meet new people in the com-
munity.
There are helpful hints on se-
lecting a school in a foreign coun-
try, an explanation of degree and
credit requirements of United
States and foreign educational
systems and a special section
covering summer study abroad.
Schedule Lecture
About Red China

PROF. JAMES NEEL
. .. cell development

amphibian egg immediately after
fertilization. In its place, the two
substituted the nucleus from an
older embryonic cell. The cell dif-
ferentiated normally. However, if
nuclei from certain cells of an
older embryo are transplanted, ab-
normal differentiation results.
Liver Extract
Markert's recent experiment,
Prof. Kemp added, carries Prof.
Briggs.and King's workna step
further. In his experiment, Mar-
kert injected an extract from the
liver of an adult frog into a re-
cently fertilized frog egg. The cell
differentiated abnormally.
"Probably all cells have a full
complement of genes. What deter-
mines the differentiation and
function of a given cell type is
what genes are activated or in-
hibited," Prof. Kemp concluded.
WYVERN:
Junior Girls'
Group Taps
Sophomores
Wyvern, the junior girls' hon-
orary, tapped 21 sophomore girls
last night.
Tapped were Lynne Belofsky,
Ronna Bergman, Shirley Chatt-
man, Audrey Dorman, Anita
Fecht, Ann Gomez, Julie Gordon,
Marilyn Grossman, Debra Hor-
witz, Carol Kaufman, and Mar-
jorie Lindaur.
Also selected were Laurie Lip-
man, Judith Oppenheim, ; JoyceI
Peckham, Barbara Portnoy, Mary
Schmidt, Margaret Skiles, Bea
Teodoro, .Diane Thime, Susan
Watson, and Mary Jane West.
Suschowk To Talk
On Radio Activity

Claims oath'
For NDEA
To Continue
A spokesman for the House1
Committee on Education and La-
bor predicted that the loyalty oath
of the National Defense Education
Act would not be repealed.
The defeat of the bill, he thinks,1
will be due to the silence shown by
students, professors and parents
who object to the act as it stands
now.
In its present form the act
states that all students applying
for a governmenthloan or grant
must sign an oath of allegiance
to the United States and an af-
fidavit stating that they "have
never been a member of and do
not believe in the goals of any
group wishing to overthrow the
government by force or violence."
Senior Society
'Taps Women
For Honorary
Senior Society tapped 16 jun-
iors and nine seniors on Wednes-
day night.
Juniors tapped for the inde-
pendent women's honorary are:
Amy Band, Elizabeth Ann Bow-
man, Anna Davis, Delores Gelios,
Jane Glick, Myra Guggenheim,
Carol Jewell, Marilyn Johnson,
Judith Levine, Mary Louise Lie-
baert, Eleanor Jo Rodger, Audrey
Schmidt, Mary Lou Seldon, Sheri-
dan Stasheff, Madelin Waggoner,
and Joan Weinberg.
Seniors admitted were Margaret
Deeter, Helen Elzey, Judith Forde,
Judith Gautz, Linda Hiratsuka,
Esther LeVine, Joan Studnicky,
Mary Wheeler, and Kay Worman.
Announce Cast
For Blue Team
Floor Show
Newly selected floor show cast
members for the Blue Team ofs
Frosh Weekend are:
Alma Henderson, SM; Edith
Bassichis; Mitzi Slawin; Mary
Cook; Judith Reilly; Joy Levy;
Victoria Elmer; Elsa Shaw; Judith
Lepofsky; Janice Weiss; Eleanor
Zane; Nancy Adelson; Jeanne Vig,
N; Karen Warmbold; Carolyn
Tufts and Susan McNeal.
Others are Stephanie Smith;
Susan Lesser; Nancy Knight; Her-
mine Drezner, E; Carol Ackerman;
Jeanne Ann Meyer; Mary Winter-
off; Gayle Pearl; Lynn Holtan, N;
Susan Schideheim and Sidni
Schwaneke.

PEACE CORPS REPORT:
Anticipates Difficulties
In Aiding African Nation

A peace corps report on condi-
tions in at least one African
country, warns of "very real
problems" that the corps will face
in its efforts to aid Africa.
The report, which deals with
Senegal, was prepared by William
Moyers, an associate director of
[Organization I
Notices
Folklore Soc., Folksing with Wayne
State Folklore Soc., April 13, 8:30 p.m.,,
508, . William.
Baha'i Student Group, Meeting, Dis-.
cussion: "The Great Figures of the
Baha'i Faith," April 14, 8 p.m., 2029
Ferdon Rd. Public Invited.
* * *
Foresters' Club, Business Meeting fol-
lowed by film "Diamonds from Jungles
of British Guiana" with R. Haack and
J. Austin, April 13, 7.30 p.m., 2042 NS.
Coffee & donuts.
* * *
Lutheran Student Assoc., Meeting of
Nurses to discuss "the Implications of
the Christian Faith in Nursing," April
13, 7:15 p.m., Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
* * *
Riding Club, Meeting, April 13, 6:50
p.m., WAB. For ride to stable.'
* * *
Sailing Club, Meeting, April 13, 7:45
p.m., 311 W. Eng.
WAA Golf Club, Meeting, April 13,
7:15 p.m., WAB.
* * *
Wesley Fdn., Grad. Student Flwshp.
dinner followed by Madrigal Singers,
April 14, 5:30 p.m., Pine Room. Phone
reservations by Thurs. noon.

the corps, who went to Africa with
Vice-President Lyndon Johnson.
Basic Difficulty
"The basic difficulty," Moyers
reported, "will be maintaining the
health of the Peace Corps volun-
teers.
"Flies, mosquitos, filth - these
all add up to a major obstacle to
success. It will be essential to
provide a public health person
and a medical assistant to each of
our teams."
The Moyers report stresses the'
difficulties to be encountered by
corps volunteers in Africa. It
states that though this report
deals only with Senegal, the con-
ditions it describes are typical of'
much of Africa, Asia and Latin
America.
Adequate Diet
"Diet adequate to health is go-
ing to be difficult to maintain,"
the report went on, "and it will
be necessary during the training
period for our volunteers to re-
ceive some basic instruction In
dietary problems, in growing small
gardens for the training depart-
ment."
The Senegal project that the
peace corps may join will involve
reclaiming land 30 miles from Da-
kar, the nation's capital.
The Senegal government hopes
to reclaim 3,000 acres, repopulat-
ing the area with residents of the
capital, who would be taught mod-
ern methods of truck-farming.

HEY GRAD STUDENTS
Been having trouble settling down
to work after a big week at Fort L.?
Settle down with us at
GRAD SOCIAL. HOUR-
VFW Club on Liberty Fri., April 14
5-7 P.M. - Please Bring I.D.
Sponsored by Graduate Student Council

DILNO 2-6264
Now!
METRO.,OLtDWYN.MAYER prst. DNATFR H
"1CIMARRO
CONEMASCOPE and METROCOLOR . *
M FORD " M M "S MK NEBAX(TER -AM O' fcW
SHOWS AT 1:00 - 3:45 - 6:10
and 9:00. Features at
1:15 - 3:45 - 6:30 and 9:20
Saturday "OPERATION EICHMANN "

i.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
sponsors the film
Engineer of Death: The Eichmann Story
Armstrong Circle Theatre T.V. Play
Followed immediately by Comment and Discussion
led by
DR. THEODORE M. NEWCOMB
Professor of Psychology
Sunday, April 16th 7:30 P.M.
All Are Welcome 1429 Hill St.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Cinema qdkI
presents
Thursday and Friday:
WAXWORKS
Saturday and Sunday:
Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
(Color)

I

ENDS
TONIGHT
(*

f
Ollm ' t f Y

DIAL
.NO 5-6290

WALT DISNV'5
NErL-ARONO Dla j a ia# n S ~
r4~~.V

I

WALT DISNEY'S

t

EXTRA "The Hound That Thought He Was A Raccoon"

Friday: Pat Boone in "All Hands On Deck"

Maude Russel, an Americani
izen who has recently retur
from a trip to Communist Chi
will speak on "Red China Tod
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 3C
the Michigan Union.
The lecture is being sponso
by the Political Issues Club an(
open to the University commun

cit-
ned
ina,
ay"
Sf

i

I

Siegfried Kracauer's book,
From Caligari to Hitler, which
studied the relationships be-
tween the films of the Weimar
Republic and the psychological
symptoms of the forces that
overthrew it, is a remarkable
document of cultural schizo-
phrenia. The most popular of
the arts, the cinema mirrors
with vivid clarity the images
that a society wishes to project
and beneath them the unstated
wishes that may seriously con-
flict with the accepted ideology.
The social historian will find
the film as rich a source for
analysis as the popular book-
perhaps more so in view of the
film's essentially oneiric qual-
ity.
Kracauer traces a line of
"tyrant" films, of which The
Cabinet of Doctor Caligari was'
the first and Waxworks, which'
we are showing Thursday and
Friday, the culmination. Our
audience requests no film more
often than Caligari, which we
cannot obtain because of our
policy of open admissions. We
hope that Caligari enthusiasts
will not fail to see its successor
of five years later-the common
elements, from the amusement
park setting with its suggestion
of inner horror, to the expres-
sionistic decor and dream se-
quences, are striking.

'I

LABORATORY PLAYBILL
TODAY 4:10 P.M. DEPT. OF SPEECH

Prof. Dietrich Suschowk of the
red University of Maryland will speak
d is at 4 p.m. today on "The General
ity. Radiation Problem" in Rm. 246 of
~-. West Eng.
A reception for Prof. Suschowk
will be held at 3:30 p.m. in Rm.
274 West Eng.
The lecture and reception are
sponsored by the Institute of Sci-
ence and Technology and mathe-
matics department.
DIAL NO 8-6416

Death of Tintagiles
by Maurice Maeterlinck
ARENA THEATRE-- FRIEZE BLDG.
No Admission Charge

NEVER BEFORE SUCH
FANTASTIC DISCOUNTS ON
ALL CAPITOL ALBUMS!
* U .,
STEREO and H1 F. . . 2Price
i when you buy a second Capitol LP at the same list price.;
I U
N; Includes complete catalogue.
Frank Sinatra - Nat Cole -eKingston Trio- Peggy Lee
Tennessee Ernie Ford - Kay Starr - Jackie Gleason
PLUS...Original Cast Broadway Show Albums...
EVERY Capitol Popular and Classical Album!
HURRY! THIS SPECIAL OFFER IS -LIMITED!

I

I

I

IT'S SURVIVAL
OF THE FITTER

(HUSBAND OR WIFE)

ENDS TONIGHT *
"One of the most c
exciting things ever,
put on celluloid!"
-Ar thur Knightt
Saturday Review
STARTING FRIDAY
"BALLAD
,OF A
SOLDIER"

I

R EC R D/

was coaxed off to Hollywood by
a handsome contract. Consid-
ered a horror specialist, he was
given popular mystery dramas
to film, of which The Cat and
the Canary was the most suc-
cessful example of the adapta-
tion (or should one say, the
prostitution) of his talents. He
died suddenly of blood poison-
ing, still a young man, in 1929.
Our short subject for this
program is worth noticing.
Women on the March is a docu-
mentary on the rights of wom-
en--on the slow progress of the
sex, which according to fascist
ideas should confine itself to
"Kirche, Kueche, Kinder" but
whose aspirations are resisted
almost as strongly in the de-
mocracies. It was not until the
19th century and in America
that such militants as Susan
Anthony, arrested for trying to
vote in 1872, Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, Lucrezia Mottand.
others shamed the conscience
of this country by their vigor-
ous protests against the prevail-
ing sexual exploitation. And it
wasn't until 1920 that women
were considered legally adult
here. In England, a similarly
vigorous campaign by Lady
Emily Parkhurst and others,
ridiculed constantly in the press,
led to legal enfranchisement.
Very few men, naturally, lent
themselves to these parades,
picketings, and similarly social-
ly embarrassing events. We
should, in this connection, no-
tice William Lloyd Garrison,
Wendell Phillips, Edward Car-
penter, Bernard Shaw, and Mox
Eastman, who indicate that in
an open society you may gain
unexpected allies; in any case,
oppressed minorities who have
to gain by the promises of our
society will get their rights only
by fighting for them.
All musical - comedies begin
with commonplace reality. Most
of them achieve nothing else.
But in a few, a time comes
when the story moves as if by
magic into a higher realm of"
fantasy, a world of musical il-
lusion where lovers sing out
their love and passing strang-
ers spontaneously join hands to
waltz, tap, or stomp their ap-
proval. It is a rare film which
can effect this subtle change,
sustain it (without jarring the
illusion too hard or too often),
and descend gracefully back
into that reality from which it
departed. Seven Brides for Sev-
en. Brothers is such a film.
Based on the rape of the Sa-
bine women and starring How-
ard Keel as the bearded leader
of six sex-starved brothers, and
Jane Powell as the bargain

b

Moliere's
musical, fanciful, danciful
comedy of love and marriage

4

DISC SHOP 'V CENTER
1210 S. University 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

SCHOOL

I

Paul Leni, the director, first
came to attention in 1921 with
Hintertreppe, in which a ser-
vant girl whose letters are in-
tercepted by a paralytic who
eventually seduces her, commits
suicide when her first lover re-
turns. It was termed "ein Kam-
merspiefifim," for the prevail-
ing morbidity was muted by the
intimacy of the photography;
the inaccompanied music that
Hindemith was writing at this
time for viola and cello would
be its acerb musical parallel.
Waxworks, however,three years
later, is considered Leni's finest
work. Robert Wiene, the guid-
-ing spirit of Caligari, supervised'
the production. Henrik Galeen
(Nosferatu) wrote the script.
Three waxworks figures became
alive in the dreams of a starv-
ing young poet ,who has been
given a commission to write
about them. The first of these,
dealing with Haroun al-Ras-
chid, is the weakest part of the
film; his capriciousness merely
toys with the underlying theme.
Ivan the Terrible is a more sat-
isfactory tyrant, with insatiable
lusts and an appetite for cruel-
ty. It is, however, the last epi-
sode, dealing with Jack-the-
Ripper, the sex murderer of
Victorian England, that Kra-
cauer says "must be counted
among the greatest achieve-

6

11

FOR

MEN, WOMEN-GET THIS VITAL
SURVIVAL TRAINING NOW !
TONIGHT -$1.50, 1.00

**
TONIGHT and TOMORROW at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Paul Leni's
WAXW ORKS SEVEN BRIDES for SEVEN BROTHERS
(Color)
with William Dieterle, Emil Jannings with Jane Powell, Howard Keel,
Carl Veidt, Werner Krauss a no el jo a ,

(.

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11

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