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March 24, 1961 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ortugal Bolts Assembly

7o

Protest Angola

UN Dle ate
Asks African
Aid Program
UNITED NATIONS (3)-United
Nations delegate Adlai E. Steven-
son yesterday called on the new
African Nations to seize the in-,
itiative in developing a broad aid
program "by, of, and for Africa."
He said it should be divorced
from the cold war, and pledged
support of the Kennedy adminis-
tration to it.
But the Chief United States del-
egate clashed immediately with
Jaja Wachuku, Nigerian economics
minister, who demanded concrete
propdosals "that are not intended
to hoodwink anybody; that are
not intended to mesmerize us."
Wachuku said he was disap-
pointed because Stevenson failed
to say just how many dollars the
United States is willing to put up.
The two spoke in the General
Assembly's political committee,
where debate opened on a help-
to-Africa, plan originally put be-
fore the UN last fall by President
Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Obviously nettled by Wachuku's
reaction, Stevenson said the Ni-
gerian was suggesting that "Af-
ricans demand an American pro-
posal for Africa."
The American delegate said he
would brush aside reference to
tricks, mesmerizing and disap-
pointment.
Stevenson made clear it was not
his purpose at this stage to ad-
vance a detailed, rigid program.
He, said that this was for the
Africans themselves to determine.
"It is also our hope," he added,
"that the various African Na-
tions, individually and -jointly, will
want to assume the responsibility
for developing a long-range pro-
gram for their continent so that
the Africans can develop Africa,
in the last analysis."

ANTAGONISTS-King Mahendra of Nepal, right, had- Premier
B. F. Koirola, left, arrested last December when the monarch as-
sumed personal control of the government. India's Premier Jaw-
abarlal Nehru has called the arrest and disbanding of parliament
a setback for democracy.
Opposition Plots Move

Talks,
D~elegations
Pass Move
Over Boycott
Afro-Asian Proposal
Wins Large Majority
UNITED NATIONS QP)-Portu-
gal walked out of the United Na-
tions General Assembly yesterday]
to protest against a proposal for
debate on the situation in the
Portuguese West African territory
of Angola.
The assembly ignored the pro-
test and approved the proposal,
sponsored by 40 African and Asian
countries and previously endorsed
by the assembly's 21-nation steer-
ing committee. The vote to put the
subject on the agenda was 79-2
with 8 abstentions.
The United States split with its
allies and voted for the move, as
it did last Wednesday in the Se-
curity Council on an Asian-Afri-
can resolution to investigate An-
gola independence riots last
month that were fatal to at least
38. That resolution fell two short
of the seven votes necessary for
adoption. The move for an As-
sembly debate followed.
Britain and France abstained
from voting again yesterday, as
they had in the Council.
Portuguese delegate Vasco Vi-
eira Garin had taken the rostrum
early in the meeting and told the
Assembly the recent disorders in
Angola were a domestic matter
and that the UN had no legal
jurisdiction.
He said his delegation, there-
fore, was lodging the strongest
possible protest against UN debate
and added:
"We are leaving the proceedings
at once."
Garin and the entire Portu-
guese delegation then left the As-
sembly chamber.
A Portuguese source said Portu-
gal would continue to take part in
other debates in the Assembly and
its committees.

.Base Wage
Hike Urged
.ByKennedy
WASHINGTON (A') - President
John F. Kennedy said last night
he finds it difficult to understand
why anyone would oppose in-
creasing the minimum wage to
$1.25 an hour over the present
floor of $1.
Kennedy made the remark at
his news conference whena re-
porter told him there had been
conflicting reports as to whether
he is willing to compromise on
an administration bill to raise the
minimum to $1.25 and extend cov-
erage to four million more work-
ers.
The President said he is hope-

MOSCOW () -- The Soviet
Union yesterday lifted direct cen-
sorship on foreign correspond-
ents' dispatches but warned they
will be expelled if their outgoing
reports displease Soviet authori-"
ties.
This announcement, made to a
news conference by the Foreign
Office Press Secretary, Mikhail
Kharlamov, made it clear that
foreign correspondents remain
subject to what is known else-
where as censorship of responsi-

bility. None of this news was
mentioned by the domestic press
or radio.
Challenges Moscow
In Washington, a State Depart-
ment statement yesterday chal-
lenged Moscow to follow up its
easing of curbs on outgoing news
by lifting censorship on what goes
to the Russian people.
The statement welcomed the
Kremlin's announcement of an
end to censorship of dispatches'

British Make Aid Effort'
Equal To U.S. Prograi
1 -

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS:
Soviet Union Lifts Censorsh

and expressed American h
that serious impediments to
free flow of information into
Soviet Union.
. Retain Copies
Under the new Soviet plan i
correspondent must retain co
of all dispatches he sends abr
for as long as he remains in 1
sia. This, Kharlamov said, will
able the correspondent to p
whether what was publis
abroad under his name actu
was sent by him.
Kharlamov disclosed that d,
censorship has not yet been 11i
for movement of photographs
television film, adding that"1
is a new question and we will h
to work it out.",He said, how-
that radio broadcasters c
send out tape recordings of t
voices provided they kept ty
written copies of all such re"
ings. There was no relaxation
the rigid internal censorship
what may appear in the Sc
Union.

ful that
measure
istration
call for
$1.25 by
4"

Congress will approve a
in line with the admin-
recommendations. These
a step-by-step hike to
1963.
I find it difficult to un-

derstand how anybody would ob-
ject to paying anybody who works
in a business which makes $1 mil-
lion a year, by 1963, $50 a week;.
I think people who are paid less
than that must find it extremely
difficult to maintain themselves,
and their families..
"I consider it to be a verymin-
imum wage," he said.
A House vote is due today on
the legislation.
Coach To Head
Fitness Program
WASHINGTON - President
John F. Kennedy yesterday named
University of Oklahoma football
coach Charles B. (Bud) Wilkinson
to head a national youth fitness
program.
Wilkinson, who is athletic di-
rector as well as football coach
at Okalahoma, will be Kennedy's
special consultant on youth fit-
ness.

WASHINGTON (AP)-Secretary
of the Treasury Douglas Dillon
says Britain now is making a for-
eign aid effort roughly in scale
with that of the United States.
But Dillon said this country has
had much less success in persuad-
ing West Germany to shoulder a
proportionate part of the burden
of helping underdeveloped coun-
tries. He said Japan is carrying
out a fairly reasonable program,
but could do more.
Dillon, who as undersecretary of
state in former President Dwight
D. Eisenhower's administration su-
pervised the United States For-
eign Aid Program, gave his views
at a closed-door session of a
House appropriations subcom-
mittee Feb. 16. The transcript was
made public yesterday.-
Dillon said in reply to a ques-
tion that the United States has
had some success during the past
two years in persuading allies to
help this country extend foreign
aid to underdeveloped countries.
"Great Britain, for instance, in
the past two or three years has
about doubled the amount of mon-
ey put into the foreign aid field,
so they are footing somewhat less

than $500 million of governmental
aid per year now. For England
that is roughly comparable on a
relative scale to what we are do-
ing," he said.

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AgainstNej
By HENRY S. BRADSHERf
PATNA, India (A') - From this
provincial capital on the Ganges,
an opposition movement is trying
to overturn the government of
Nepal.
For the second time in a dozen
years, exiles from Nepal are brew-
lng in Patna what could become a
revolution against the regime in
Katmandu, one hour's flying time
to the north. Pamphlets are being
smuggled into Nepal and a civil
disobedience movement is being
organized there by agents from
Patna.
The exiles of the Nepali Con-

U.S., Britain Ask Soviet Help
In Nuclear Peace Explosions

gress Party recognize that the sit-
down strikes and refusals to pay
taxes of some future civil dis-
obedience movement could easily
lead to violence among the tough
mountain people. The exiles do not
preach armed action; neither do
they flinch from the possibility of,
violence.
There was fighting in 1950 when
the exiles had the king of Nepal
on their side against the Rana
clan of hereditary prime ministers.
Now they are challenging the king
in an attempt to restore an elected
prime minister.
In 1951 the exiles won their
struggle. The new exiles face a
tougher battle against traditional
respect for a king who says Nepal
must be run his way until it is
made ready for democracy--say
in about five years.
Wins Election
The leader of the first revolu-
tion was B. P. Koirala. In 1959 his
Congress Party swept Nepal's first
popular elections and he became
prime minister. Last Dec. 15 King
Mahendra jailed Koirala because
he thought the dynamic prime
minister was working to abolish
the monarchy. Since then Maren-
dra has run Nepal with the hel
of young ministers who had stood
by Koirala's side in the first revo-
lution.
The top exile is the ex-deputy
prime minister, Gen. Subarna
Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana.
The grandson of a Rana prime
minister by a commoner wife,
therefore in a branch of the family
ineligible for top office, Subarna
became a rebel in 1948.

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I

GENEVA M-The United States
and Britain asked the Soviet Un-
ion yesterday to Join theme in a
program of peaceful nuclear, ex-
plosions designed to give the world
more safe harbors and make des-
erts bloom.
The Soviet delegate took a dim
view of the idea. y
The proposal was advanced by
American delegate Arthur H.
Dean at a 17-minute meeting of
the Nuclear Weapons Test Sus-
pension Conference. Dean declar-
ed nuclear power deployed for
peaceful uses would provide great
benefits for all mankind -- not
just for the three atomic powers.
He suggested that the world's
newly emerging nations in Asia
and Africa were .being penalized
by failure to get such projects
started.
"This program represents a
new frontier in applying basic sci-
ence which our scientists are eager
to explore,' Dean declared.
For the second 'day in a row
Soviet delegate Semyon K. Tsar-
apkin kept mum in the confer-
ence. But talking to newsmen
after the meeting adjourned, he
expressed doubt about the whole
concept of peaceful explosions.
Under the American-British
plan such a pact would prohibit
the testing of atomic and hydro-

gen devices for military develop-
ment purposes. But it would al-
low safeguarded nuclear explo-
sions for scientific research and
to carry out great engineering
projects.
The United States already has
Tdone some preparatory work for
two such peaceful blasts: one
would be conducted underground
in New Mexico for general re-
search purposes, including the
study of isotopes. The other calls
for construction of a harbor in
Alaska by means of a 200-kiloton
blast, corresponding to the force
of 200,000 tons of TNT.
Church Disbands
Priest Association
WARSAW, Poland OP)-A Com-
munist-backed group of 300 Ro-
man Catholic priests has submit-
ted to a church order to disband
or be defrocked, informed sources
reported yesterday.
A majority of the governing
board of the "Caritas" Priests As-
sociation voted Wednesday to dis-
band after Stefan Cardinal Wy-
szynski, who is locked in. a new
church-state struggle with Po-
land's Communist Party, gave it
until April 1 to do so.

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER

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C. E. STEPHENSON, DIRECTOR
MARCH 29-APRIL 1

Box Office Opens Monday
10 A.M.-5 P.M.

LYDIA MENDtLSSOHN
THEATER

Wed.-Thurs. $1.50
Fri.-Sat. $1.75

1

TYPEWRITER
SALE
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

"1

1216 So. Univ.

NO 3-9333

I?

WOULD YOU LIKE TO
MAKE MORE MONEY?

11

E

FAVORS
by
BU D-MOR

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
FINAL SUPPER CLUB
until after Passover
Sunday, March 26,6 P.M.
1429 Hill Street
Followed by Social Dancing

11

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11

BICYCLE
AUCTION
TO, BE HELD INSIDE GARAGE
IN CASE OF BAD WEATHER

1103 S. University NO 2-6362
Morrie Richman's
CAFE
PROMETH EAN
508 East William
NOW SERVING
LUNCHES
11 :00 A.M.-1 :30 P.M.
Monday thru Friday
TONIGHT
introducing
FOLK SINGER
CHICK JUNG
9-12 P.M. Adm. 75c
open 'til 2:00 A.M.
SATURDAY NITE

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Would you like to
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IF YOU DO .. .

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rent and sell through

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SATURDAY, MARCH 25-Beginning at 9 A.M.

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