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March 22, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CYTOPLASM EFFECTS:
Markert Views Non-Genetic Heredit
~ ,.i.

By PHILIP SUTIN
The synthesis of proteins is a'
joint enterprise of the genes and
cytoplasm of cells, Prof. Clement;
Markert of John Hopkins Univer-
sity said yesterday.7
This view is at variance with the1
original belief that heredity is due
solely to the genetic component
of a cell, since it would have the
cytoplasm (cell-body material)
modify the structure of the protein
which initially was a gene product.
Genes synthtesize enzymes which
lead to the formation of amino
acids and proteins. Each gene con-
trols a specific enzyme and pro-
tein. In the development of the
cell, various genes are repressed or
activated, he explained..
Responsible for Coloration
The development of melanin, a
pigment resporisible for coloration,
is an example of such gene control.
The genes of the pigment-bearing
cells produce an enzyme, tyrosi-
nose, which facilitates the synthe-
sis of the coloration.
However, the cells can be
changed so that they never ac-,
quire the ability to ntake the
chemicals needed to synthesize
pigment, Markert said.
The cells where melanin is
formed, the' melanocytes in the
skin and the pigment cells in the
retina, may be altered to prevent
the formation of proteinous fibers
upon which the melinin is norm-
ally deposited.
Cells are Factor
Other cells in the tissue are an-
other factor in the synthesizing of
specific proteins. Prof. Markert
noted the work of David Peck of
John Hopkins University who took
sensory retina tissue of a chick's
eye and cultured the cells separ-
ately. Each developed into a pig-
ment cell. "This infers that the
environment may activate genes,"
Markert said.
"The role of other substances in

the metazoan cell is to regulate
the gene function," he added.
He noted the change in chromo-
somes and histomes of the sperms
of snails. During spermogenesis
the lycine of adult cells is replaced
by arginine which is followed by
protoamine. After fertilization
with the female egg, argine reap-
pears and by the gastula stage of
the embryo' the lycine found in
adult snails appears.
Chemical Change
"This chemical change, the sim-
plification of the chromosome, is
to facilitate its subsequent spe-
cialization," he said.
Contrary to present theory, Prof.
Markert said, the non-DNA (a:
complex chemical in the cell nu-
clei) parts of chromosomes may
also have an effect on the origin of
specific proteins and therefore the
cell functions. This is illustrated
by the puffing out of non-DNA
parts on fruit fly chromosomes.
During the development of the

cell these puffs grow in a way
characteristic of the cell, indi-
cating that these areas have an
influence on protein synthesis.
It is possible to alter the puffing
of the chromosome by putting the
nucleus of one embryo cell into
the cytoplasm of another embry-
onic cell, he noted.
Cites Transplants
Margert also cited the results of
recent transplants of the nucleus
of a cell of one species of frog to
the cytoplasm of a cell of a differ-
ent species. Once transplanted
there are chromosome changes
within 12 to 14 cell divisions of the
embryo.
"The longer the nucleus is in
the foreign cytoplasm, the more
changed the chromosomes will
become," he added.
If transplanted back to the tis-
sue of the original species, the
chromosome will regain its old
characteristics within _50 cell divi-
sions of the embryo.

'U' To Open
Parking Lot
To Students
The fourth floor of the Cath-
erine Street faculty parking lot
will be opened to students in the
next few weeks, William Warnock,
161BAd, chairman of the Driving
Regulations Administrative Board,
said yesterday. I
Only final arrangements for
administering the new student
parking are needed for the change
to become effective.
The committee, which is meet-
ing weekly, is also discussing pos-
sible new student parking struc-
tures.
"The maJor problem in this area
Is financial," Warnock said. Park-
ing structures cost $2,006 per car
to build.. There is presently only
$80,000 availeble.from student fees.

PROF. CLEMENT MARKERT;,
.. non-genetic heredity

NOM NATED
. NAEPOSITIVELY
FOR 5 ENDS
ACADEMY THURSDAY
AWARDS DIAL NO 8-6416
"A carnival of carefree glee ... a steddy flow of laughter.
Sheer fun!" N.Y. World Telegram
"A bubbling champagne cinema cocktail." -Cue Magazine
A KHAPWSET-WALcER OF PIMANUS.
:. 2wua.e Sd oWt S by JWS DAMSY
SU1PER O'R
monitor A 3 .M n,730P.M
Doors Open at 1 :00 p.m. and 7:00 p m.
ADULTS WEEKDAY MATINEES.....................90c
ADULTS EVENINGS AND SUNDAY................$1.25
CHILDREN UNDER 12 YEARS .....................50c

"AT BOTH STORES"

ALL ANGEL

STEREO U HI FI
.Y2 price

;'

when you buy a second Ang. LP
at the same iis' f price.
Includes complete cafdlogue.
DISC',SHOP; r ,
&TV'(FINTER
121 a S. Universifiy 304 "S. Thayer
NO 3.6922 Nth 5-4855

ORCHESTRAS
by
BUD-MOR

T lum, DIAL
ARTS ' TOD AY l olmlll NO 5-5290
a 16911)1
FROM. SLY... SOPHISTICATED...GEORGE BERNARD SHAW,.:
THE , FASCINATING FLIRTATIONS'
Of ' A BEAUTIFUL REDHEAD...
AND HER WILD, WONDERFUL,,;
t QUEST, FQ.RROMANCE!

1103 S. University

NO 2-6362

ON STAGE
Mon., March 27, 8:30 P.M.
JOSE
RECO
and
an ESPANISHDANCERS
Singers and Musicians
Main Floor $2.50, $3.00
Balcony $2.00, $3.00
Box Office 1 to 5:30 P.M.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

Dil
2-62'64

Now!

;.j

r , .:. . . . . . , . .

TRANING for
theLegalProfessionP
rofessor Roy L. Stinheimer,
Admissions OffiCer
Professor Lionel H. LainA
Advisor for pre-legal studies
ovie:-"MASTERY OF THE LAW"
Discussion to followm ovie.
VWVednes~ay, March 22

L

"We have started to work on some new concepts, of playing
which will give freer rain to the creativity of the improvisor and
yet produce an even stronger form." John Lewis
MODERN JAZZ
QUARTIET
Next Friday.. March 24, 8:30 P.M.
fh Tickets $1.50, 2.25, 2.75, 3.25, 3.50
on sale at DISC SHOP, 1210 So. University
M and Hl Fl and ,TV CtNTER, 304' So. Thayer

Room 3C Union

7:30 p.m.

*a 1410ow. -" .
AtASTAIR SIMIDENNIS PRICE IGARY RAYMONDtAnAVITTORIO QE SICA
PW..d by PIERRE ROUVE 1 Oimood by ANTHONY ASQUITH I So"goay by WOLT MANKOWITZ 111" On !ut Plgr by BERNARD SMAO
Cot OR BY OE LUxE CINEmA.SCOP1 A Exndbt ae cnm sw Pmdmcto «^ o.

s:
..1.. l."! . 4.... r:
1.ir .?,.,.,, 6.v.. .a.r. .1.7k

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III

so

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DRAMATIC 'ARTS CENTER
presents ,
"Wee a 's. New York,"
and other films from Cinema] 6
ri., Mar. 24 YM-YWCA Budding
Shows at 7 P.M. and 9 P.M.

I

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i
"i

The Development ouncilt Concert
AY, C. mR,,LES
April 112 Hill Auditorium
t
Tickets. $2.00; 1.75, 11.00

I

t

DAC members free

III

BURTON
M T R VEL U-ES

I

vurwvE CDAi1 'r U' C ATI AMTlr TA T64F RININE

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