100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 18, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E OF 'EXODUS':
stain Relates Details
Refugee 'Ship's Tlrip
R fe 8 ee1'
N

By JUDITH SATTLER
be day the Royal British
escorted my ship, 'Exodus,'
the port of Haifa was a day
feat-but defeat was turned
victory," Issac Aronowicz,,
er of the "Exodus," said
sday.
eaking at the United Jewish
al dinner, Aronowicz told of
xperiences in trying to break
British blockade with the
eus" to take Jewish refugees
destine in 1947.
e "Exodus" story began In
more when a battered ferry-
was brought and outfitted by
'ican Jews. It became the cen-
f a mass movement of refu-
he said.
Strengthen Palestine
ael was fighting "to break;
the barred gates of Pales-
to settle the waste lands
and to strengthen Palps-
3fighting force, Aronowicz
The "Exodus" was working
ie first of these battles.
o other ship had set out to
c the British blockage," he
ined, "but we on the 'Exodus'
we could do it.
hie British knew our plan, and
ed to make this the last
ge of immigration. If the 'Ex-
succeeded, there would be
ships.
wo crewmen died and the en-
uperstructure of the ship was
n up by British destroyers.
vere ordered to seek a truce,
the British came aboard and
s into Haifa."

In the port, thousands of Jewish
immigrants came, the captain
said, and sang a resistance song.
The British took these and the
people from the "Exodus" and
sent them supposedly to Cyprus.
Instead they were taken to the
port in France from which they
came.
The ships were in, the French
port four weeks while the British
tried to force the Jews to dis-
embark and to become French
citizens, he said. Although the
people were "caged in the holds"
of the ships in hot weather, none
left the ships.
After a hunger strike by the
refugees, the British sailed again,
this time taking the refugees back
to Germany. Many were interned
again in concentration camps,
Aronowicz said.
Partition Palestine
Finally, seven weeks later, the
United Nations partitioned Pales-
tine, and the Jewish state was
created..
"Our need to return home is
invincible," he said.
invincible, said Aronowicz.
"Israel's one source of strength
is the human element, the social
climate.in which everyone feels a
part," he said.
Today Israel is still fighting, he
added. The -border fighting and
economic boycott imposed by the
United Arab nations which sur-
"Zion is again a, land struggling
round the nation, impose a threat.
with arms."
The Arab pressure, added to
pressure from the Soviet Union,
endangers Israel with a "strategy
of strangulation," he said. "We are
pulled into a cracy race, of arms
and resources, in which we have.
no interest."
Aronowicz called for both more'
settling on farms in the "vac-
cuum" of western Galilee, and
more work in integrating new im-
migrants to increase the strength
of Israel.
oOrganization
Notices
Congregational-Disciples E & R Stud.
Guild, Fireside, NBC's Documentary
Film: "White Paper on the 'Sit-Ins',"
Mar. 18, 8:30 p.m., Everyone Welcome.
* * *
Folklore Soc., Banjo & Guitar In-
struction Workshop, Mar. 18, 2-4 p.m..
SAB, Std Fl.
* . S
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Mar.
20, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.,
* s «s
Latvian Club, Latvian Lutheran Serv-
ice, Mar. 19, 7:30 p.m., Hill at Forest.
Wesley Fdn., Mar. 19, 10:15 a.m., Pine
Rm. Speaker: Dr. N. Hayner, "What Is
Your Christian Concern?"; Supper fol-
lowed by Rev. W. Baker speaking on
"The Atonement," Mar. 19, Supper at
5:30 p.m., Speaker at 7 p.m., Wesley
Louge.

Regents List
Department
A ontees
The Regents yesterday appoint-
ed Prof. Charles Stevenson as
acting chairman of the philosophy
department for this seaester.
Prof. William Frankena, cur-
rent chairman, asked to be reliev-
ed of his duties in order to devote
more time to teaching and re-
search.;
Prof. Donald F. Eschman of the
geology department was appoint-
ed by the Regents yesterday to
the department chairmanship for
a five-year term beginning this
fall.
The Regents also named Prof.
Roger C. Cramton to be visiting
associate professor of law for the
1961-62 year.
Now at the University of Chi-
cago, Prof. Cramton is an assist-
ant dean and chairman of the
Committee on Graduate Study,
New Chairman
In other appointments in the
literary college, Prof. Harold M.
Levinson will become acting chair-
man of the economics department
while Prof. Gardner Ackley is on
leave.
Prof. Leigh C. . Anderson was
reappointed as chairman of the
chemistry department for a five-
year term starting with the cur-
rent academic year.
Prof. Donald J. Lewis, current-
ly on leave from the University
of Notre Dame, will be associate
professor of mathematics in the
1961-62 school year. He spent the
last two years in England for the
National Science Foundation.
Christian Pommerenke will also
be an assistant professor of math-
ematics next term.. He is now
teaching at the University of Got-
tingen in West Germany.
From Cornell
Prof. Conrad S. Yocum, now at
Cornell University, will be asso-
ciate professor of botany begin-
ning with the next term.
Other appointments for the
Law School include Prof. Stan-
ford H. Kadish to be professor of
law beginning with the fall .se-
mester. He is now a visiting pro-
fessor of law at Harvard 'Law
School. Formerly, he was on the
University of Utah faculty and a
Fulbright lecturer at the Univer-
sity of Melbourne, Australia.
Prof. Frank R. Kennedy will
also become professor of law next
term. He has taught at the Uni-
versity of Iowa since 1940 except
during a three-year period as at-
torney with the Office of Price
Administration.
The Regents also granted re-
quests for indeterminate tenure
to Prof. Mathew Alpern and Prof.
Saul Roseman, both of the Medi-
cal School.
Prof. David K. Felbeck was
named associate professor of
mechanical engineering for three
years starting with the fall semes-
ter. He has been with the Nation-
al Academy of Sciences since 1956.

By FRED RUSSELL KRAMER
Prof. Julian C. Saushkin, of the
geography department at the
University of Moscow, yesterday
described the method by which
Russia will increase its production
based on the principles of economic
geography.
His lecture dealt with the inter-
relation of productive forces with-
in large areal complexes of the
U.S.S.R.
Large area complexes consist of
a "pattern of interwoven natural,
labor and material resources with
numerous links between them," he
said. It is the task of the economic
geographer to make out these
interweavings and relations and
to isolate the regular areal com-
binations of productive forces."
Prof. Saushkin noted that "the
structure of the complexes should
be analyzed, not by the branches
of economy, but by the cycles of
interrelated industries unified by
a definite type of power source."
He described eight power sources
among which are the pyrometal-'
lurgical cycle of ferrous metals, the'
oil-power-chemical cycle, the ag-
gregation of cycles of the pro-
cessing industry and the hydro-
reclamation cycle of industry-1
irrigation agriculture.
In order to demonstrate how'
NameSonnel
WAA Head
Lee Sonne, '62, has been chosen
president of the Women's Ath-
letic Association for the coming
year.
Miss Sonne is presently mana-
ger of the Riding Club and has
been a member of the WAA Board
for two years.
Petitioning for other WAA of-
fices closes Friday, March 24. New
officers will be announced at
League Night, April 13.

4i)

'INTERWOVEN' RELATIONSHIP:
Russian Explains Production Planning

PROF. JULIAN SAUSHKIN
.. economic geographer
economic geography is applied to
planning he described large area
complexes in terms of their
energy-production cycle methods.
The first complex he described
is the processing-industrial com-
plex which is located in the cen-
tral industrial region in the Mos-
cow basin. Natural resources are
very poor and raw materials must
be shipped in from other regions.
However, the high population
density (80-90 people per square
kilometer), the thousands of old
and new processing industries, and
its high degree of advanced trans-
portation and communication fa-
cilities make it a highly important
region, he said.
Automation and electrification
of production will insure a great
increase in the productivity of
labor in industry. This extra man-
power will be applied to the con-
struction of industry. He notes
that at present, 18 -new -apart-
ments are being built for every
1,000 people in Moscow each year.
Furthermore, a vast syncline dis-
covered deep below Moscow may

contain large deposits of untapped
mineral resources.
The Ural mountains are a re-.
gion of great mineral resources
with pig lion production that is
almost as great as all of Great
Britain, he said. Eventually this
region will be very much like the
central industrial region. He noted
that, "atomic electric stations are
being built in the Urals."
The central Asian complex is
characterized by vast resources of
hydroelectric power. A 300 meter
high dam will supply hydro-
electric power equal to three mil-
lion kilowatts. "Middle Asia in the
nearest future will be the Soviet
Kuwait - one of the most im-
portant oil producing region in the
world."
The last region he mentioned
is the "frontier" region of Eastern
Siberia and Yakutia. In this area
there are three million square kil-
ometers with only one-half mil-
lion people.
In the future, economic geo-
graphers will set up mathematical
models of production cycles to
plan the growth of the area. Great
numbers of people will probably
be transfered to help its growth,
he said.
Skating Club
To Give Show
The Ann Arbor Figure Skating
Club will present its 19th annual
"Melody on Ice" show at 8 p.m.
today and 3 p.m. tomorrow at the
Michigan Ice Rink.'
Bruce Heiss, 16 year old brother'
of Olympic gold medal winner
Carol Heiss, will be a guest soloist.
University students featured in
the production include Carol Por-
ter, '64; Kingsley Brown, '63; and
Gerhard Fuerst, '62E. Approxi-
mately 250 club members will par-
ticipate in the program.

"The group has lifted the purely musical development of jazz
up to a higher standard than any other in jazz history."
--London Daily Express
MODERN JAZZ-
QUARTET.'
Next Friday, March 24, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets $1.50, 2.25, 2.75, 3.25, 3.50
on sale at DISC SHOP, 1210 So. University
and HI Fl and TV CENTER, 304 So. Thayer

COMING TO OUR STAGE
JOS i RECO
and his Company of
SPANISH DANCERS Person
Singers and Musicians
MICHIGAN THEATRE ORCH. 300-with FLAMENCO
MON., MAR. 27th BCL. $3.00 - 2.0 GUITARISTS
at 8:30 P.M. BAL. $3.00 - 2.00 and SINGERS

" foiwAnaa

.m

-

RESTAURANT
315 South State Street- NO 3-3441
For BREAKFASTS or LUNCHES or tasty complete DIN-
NERS we serve nothing but the finest in foods. For
your eating enjoyment, we suggest that you choose
from the following specialties this weekend:
* DEEP FRIED FIJET OF SOLE,
tartar sauce, wedge of lemon, french fried pota-
toes, creamy Cole slaw . .. .. .. .. .... . 1.40

id Eases

f'

* GRILLED CENTER-CUT PORK CHOPS,

Rules

Apple sauce, french fried potatoes, beet salad
1.40

* BROILED CHOICE TENDERLOIN,

I
v

Zelaxed dress standards for all
idents of Tyler and Prescott
uses in East Quadrangle went
effect last night.
Che residenits 'of these, houses,
h of which are predominantly
duate students and share a
nmon dining room, will only
d to wear coat, tie and dress
users for Tuesday and Thurs-
7dinners, and at Sunday noon.
all other meals, school dress
irt with, collar and full length
users) will be required.
ohn H.'Taylor, resident direc-:
of East Quad, said the revised
imum dress standards resulted
rn a discussion with the 'men of
er House on Wednesday and
e initiated as an "experiment."
'It must be remembered that
se standards pertain only to
dining room. Whenever the
n-eat in any other dining room,
y will be expected to conform
the dress standards of that

FILLS HISTORY'S PAGES:
Architect States Goal of Archeology

golden fried onion rings, cottage fried potatoes,
tossed garden salad .. .. .................1.85

The above dinners include hot roll and butter) and
choice o f freshly-brewed coffee, tea or milk,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By JUDITH BLEIER
The basic reason that the arch-
eologist goes to work is to "fill up
the great many blank pages in
history," Prof. A. Henry Detweiler,
associate dean of the architecture
college at Cornell University, not-
ed yesterday.
Certain facts apply to geographi-
cal sites where archeologists are
interested in making excavations,
Prof. Detweiler, associate director
of the Harvard-Cornell expedition
to Sardis, said. "Orginally towns
became established because there
were good reasons for living
there."
A rich soil, adequate water sup-
ply and pleasant climate have in-
variably been conducive to civiliza-
tion, he explained, "and whatever
happened people always kept com-
ing back."
Built Huts
Prof. Detweiler showed a photo-
graph of a Near Eastern "tell,"
(hill) in the Jordan Valley. Here
ancient peoples built rather rude
huts and prospered. Eventuaily
nearby villagers became jealous,
raided the city and drove out the
townspeople. But the conditions
still remained and soon a new
culture arose.
A vertical cross-section of a
mound may reveal as many as
twenty civilizations. "Our prob-
lem is to peel off the layers," Prof.
Detweiler remarked.
One excavation shows a suc-
cession of cultures beginning with
the Ottoman Turks. Then came
the Byzantine empire, the Romans,
the Greeks, and the Lydians.
Need Evidence
The archeologist nust find des-
criptive or chronological evidence
that fits in with an excavation of
a particular mound, he explained.
Most Near Eastern cities yield
literary remains.
"Of course, the ideal method
would be to take off whole layers
at a time," Prof. Detweiler said,

"but the archeologist usually only
digs in sections."
By plotting a graphic represen-
tation of an area he can almost
always tell enough from segments
alone, he added.
The archeologist then examines
the artifacts of each layer. A
cuneiform letter, given a date of
1400 B.C., determines the parti-
cular civilization of everything
else around it, Prof. Detweiler ex-
plained Similarly coins and "sca-
rabs" (name tags, 1700-1550 B.C.)
serve as absolute dating material.
"Coins, which first showed up
in the fifth century B.C. are just
as accurate as a 1955 Lincoln
penny," he noted.
Pottery is the material found in
the largest quantity. "We have
been able to find segments of clay
vessels that date back to the very
early periods of history," Prof.
Detweiler said,
Restore Remains
Of course, archeologists rarely
gbs
Gibbs-trained college women are ip
demand to assist executives in every
field. Write College Dean about Special
Course for College Women. Ask for
GIBBS GIRLS AT WORK.
KATHARINE GIBBS
SECRETARIAL
BOSTON 16, MASS. 21 Marlborough Street
,NEW YORK 17, N. V . . . 230 Park Avenue
MONTCLAIR. N. L . . . 33 Plymouth Street
PROVIDENCE 6, R. 1. . . . 155 Angell Street

discover whole pieces, he explain-
ed, and remains are usually re-
stored from tiny fragments.
Economics often hampers the
archeologist, Prof. Detweiler re-
marked. He discussed a particular
hill in southern Palestine where
it is evident that early classical
tradition faded into later civiliza-
tion.
However, in order to excavate,
"we would have to have bought
the whole town," Detweiler said.
The Cornell-Harvard expedition
to Sardis was organized in 1957.

DIAL
NO 2-6264

NOW

it

I.--+

!he Daily Official Bulletin is an
icial publication of The Univer-
r of Michigan for which The
chigan Daily assumes no editorial
ponsibility. Notices should be
t in TYPEWRITTEN form to
ml 3519 Administration Building,
ore 2 p.m. two days preceding
Ulication.
SATURDAY, MARCH 18
GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
THE TOLL GATE
William S. Hart, U.S.A., 1920)
and
HIS BITTER P LL
(Prod. by Mack Sennett,'
U.S.A., 1916)
.kham Amphitheatre, Monday,
rch 20, 8. p.m. Admission is
ly by subscription. A subscrip-
to the four remaining pro-
ms of -the series costs $2.00.
further information, call NO
i685 'or"'NO 2-9359.

General Notices
Residence Hall Scholarship: Women
students wishing to apply for a Resi-
dence Hall Scholarship for the academ-
ic year 1961-62 for Betsy Barbour Resi-
dence may .do so through the Office of
the Dean of Women. Applications must
be returned complete by March 31. Stu-
dents already living in this residence
hallr and' those wishing to live there
nextfall may apply. Qualifications will
be considered on the basis of academic
standing (minimum 2.5 cumulative
average), need, and contribution to
group living.
Events Sunday
Challenge Lecture: Sun., March 19 at
2:30 p.m. in Aud. B. "The Ideological
Struggle: Communism vs. Western
Democracy" will be discussed by Prof.
Richard Park, Prof. Samuel Shapiro,
Michigan State University and Alvin
Bentley, former ±epresentative to Con-
gress.:
Placement
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Library of Congress,rWashington, D.C.
-Analyst In Agricultural Economics for.
Natural Resources Div. of Legislative
Reference Service. College grad. with
degree in Econ., a general knowledge
of agric. econ., & 1 yr. relevant research
exper.
Nationally Known Company, Detroit
area-Sales Career Training. Several
openings. Degree not essential, but
ages 25-40, sales background preferred.
International Business Machines,

Dearborn, Mich.-Educational Consult-
ant for South Bend, Fort Wayne, In-
diana & Akron, Cleveland, Ohio areas.
WOMAN. Some teaching exper. prefer-
red-commercial subjects highly de-
sirable.
Michigan Hospital Service (Blue
Cross-Blue Shield), Detroit-Statistician
for Market Research & Statistics Di-
vision. Grad. with major or possibly
minor in math/statistics.
Hotel Corporation of America, Bos-
ton, Mass.-Several openings for Man-
agement Training Program. Training in
General or Food & Beverage Mgmt.,
Budget & Control, or Sales. various
locations.
Please contact Bureau of Appts., 4021
Admin., Ext. 3371 for further informa-
tion.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-128H West Engrg. Bldg., Ext.
2182. For seniors & grad. students.
MARCH 21-.
Air Reduction Co., Inc., Murray Hill,
N.J., N.Y. City, Jersey City, Union,
N.J.; Chicago, Los Angeles, Southeast-
ern U.S. & Eastern U.S.-All Degrees:
ChE, EE,, ME. MS-PhD: Met. BS: CE,
E. Physics & IE. Des., R. & D:, Tech.
Allen-Bradley Co., Main Plant in
Milwaukee, Wisc.; Sales Offices in Prin-
cipal Cities-BS-MS: BE, IE & ME. Des.,
R. & D., Sales & Prod.
Atlantic Refining Co., Philadelphia-
Alt Degrees: ChE. Des., Sales & Tech.
Service.
Ball Brothers Co., Inc., Home Office,
Muncie, Indiana-BS: ChE, IE & ME.
BS: Mgmt. Trng. Program & Mktg.
(Sales). Sales & Mgmt. Trng.
Budd Co., Detroit-BS-MS: IE & ME.
2 yr. Mgmt. Trng. Program-Leads to
(Continued on Page 4)

... . conveniently located . .
economy minded ... home-like
comfort.... that's why the Aller-
ton Hotel is Chicago headquar-
ters for many school groups,
business and professional stu-
dent affairs, field trips, athletic
teams, debate teams, speech
clinics, tours, etc.
For your -own Chicago visit or
week-end stay choose the hotel
close to everything on
- ichigan Avenue's
Magnificent Mile

Winnerof11ACADEMY
i.AWARDS
including BEST PICT URE
"BEST ACTOR" "BEST
"BEST SUPPORTING
DIRECTION" ACTOR"
"BEST eBEST
CINEMATOGRAPHY" FILM EDITING"
(COLOR) "'BEST
"BEST SPECIAL. EFFECTS"
ART DIRECTION" I
(COLOR) "BEST SOUND"
"BEST ' "BEST COSTUME"
'MUSIC SCORE"- - (COLOR)

w l2lhER TSNTIE u 2Shows Daily at 1:30and 7:30
Doors Open at 1 :00 and 7:00
" Nh A ADULT EVENING and SUNDAY .. ...... .....$1.25
..n. s ADULT WEEKDAY MATINEES .... .... 90c
CHILDREN (Under Twelve Years)........... ...50c

....

I

11

_5riMAK r*r*Cl imeAl. %k1111F l

----I

N~

DIAL NO 5-6290r
ENDS TONIGHT *

3KL ANU) D INAL V ttI
NOMINATED FOR FIVE
ACADEMY AWARDS
IiE KAPPSiTRE T-WAIKER O PIl4AEUS..

*
TONIGHT and SUNDAY a 7 and 9
Dickens'
The Pickwick Papers
with James Hayter, James Donald,
Nigel Bruce, Hermione Gingold,

CLOSES TONIGHT'
IT'S YOUR
LAST CHANCE
to see the
GILBERT & SULLIVAN
SOCIETY PRODUCTION

* {

The ribald, impudent,
but always moving
account of the encounter
between a girl-of-
the-streets in a Grecian
seaport town...
and the American

who wants to rescue
her from her desperate
(or is it?)
situation...

SUNDAY

x I

"TRIAL BY JURY"

and

I

w ,r-

179

I

F7.

I

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan