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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'U'Students
Win Wilson
Fellowships
Twenty University students
have won 1961-62 Woodrow Wil-
son Fellowships, the Woodrow
Wilson National Fellowship Foun-
dation announced yesterday.
In addition, 24 University stu-I
dents were given honorable men-
tion.
The fellowships carry a stipend
of $1,504 plus family allowances
and full costs for a year's gradu-
ate study at any university of
the .recipient's choice in the Unit-
ed States or Canada.
Since the fellowships were es-
tablished in 1945, more students
from the University have receiv-
ed these awards than from any
other state-supported institution
in the country.
'U' Winners
University winners were Walter
D. Anderson, '61; Richard Bau-
man, '62L; William B. DeLoach,
'61; Sharon A. Edwards; '61; Uldis
R. Golts. '61; D. Rudite Jirgen-
sons, '61; Jack R. Jokipii, '61; Da-
vid P. Jordon, '61; Howard L.
Nack, Grad.; Gerald H. Newsome
'61.
Also Max E. Noordhorn, '61;
Walter G. Pence, '61; Ronnie I.
Posner, '61; Wendell A. Schultz,
'61; Sue A. Walker, '61; Sharon
J. Wall, '61; Dorothy A. Wilson,
'61; Hugh H. Witemeyer, '61; Kar-
en A. Woodard, '61, and Donald S.
Young, Grad.
Honorable Mention
University students accorded
honorable mention were Char-
laie E. Ackerman, Grad; Hed-
wig I. Bergmann, '61; Ruth. Bers,
'61; John Boyd, '61; Richard W.
Brozovich, '61; John P. Comar-
oni, '61; Mary Craig, '61; Susan
Deo, '61; Joseph F. Druker, '61;
Mildred Friedman, '61; Walter S.
Glazer, '61..
Charles N. Lindquist, '61;
Charles D. McLaughlin, '61; Eu-
genia M. Parry, '61; Gerald R.
Powers, '61 Juliette R. Slutz, '61
John D. Sterritt, '61; Tena N.
Tarler, Grad; Janet L. Trautwein,
'61; Jonathon Trost, '61; Judith
C. Weinberger, '61.. Grace Wein-
er, '61; and Carol L. Weinstock,
'61.

DINNER AFTER PERFORMANCE:
Band Finds U.S., Soviet Concert Customs Different

The University Symphony Band
is finding Russian concerts vastly
different from an appearance in
an American theater, Frederick E.
Moncrief, business manager with
the band, reports from Moscow.
Local custom has concerts sche-
duled at 7 p.m., an hour or so
earlier than in the United States.
This has meant that 94 students
eat lunch about 1 p.m., have tea
at 5:30 p.m. and then perform on
what band members consider to
be an empty stomach.
After a long concert, with many
encores, the musicians return to
the hotel and have a full supper.
In Russia it is also customary to
keep the audience out until a few
minutes before, the concert is to
begin. Several times this system
has brought concern to the faces
of the bandsmen who, on looking
out into the audience, have found
only a few seats occupied. Then
suddenly, following a big rush, the
hall is full and the concert begins.
Tuning Backstage
For years the band has tuned
up instruments back stage and
then tuned en masse on stage just
before concerts. Both customs are
frowned upon in Russia when-
ever the audience is anywhere in
the vicinity. Hence, the students
have to go far away from the
stage to tune up while waiting for
word to go on stage.
Another Soviet custom is check-
ing hats and coats on entering al-
'Frosh Weekend'
Sets Mass Meeting
A mass meeting for anyone in-
terested in participating in Frosh
Weekend will be held at 8 p.m.
today in the ballroom of the
Michigan League.
BOOK SALE
9c andup

most any public building. The
checking is free and quick. A
number of students have remark-
ed on how interesting the hat
racks look when covered with fur
hats. "They are just like a tree
full of sleeping Teddy bears,"
Moncrief reported.
Check Garments
All of the students and the
staff of 10 accompanying the
band now know that wearing a
hat and coat into a public dining

room or other areas is "uncultur-
ed." They now check garments.
"Because of the difference in
languages, at every concert each
composition and its composer is
announced in Russian by an im-
pressario who strides magnifi-
cently onto the stage," he said.
The language barrier becomes
more difficult, however, when
such musical pieces as "Relax"
by Paul Yoder and "Beguine for
Band" by Glen Osser are announc-
ed. There are no Russian equiva-
lents for these words. To avoid
lengthy explanations, the English
words are used, leaving the au-

dience to draw its own conclu-
sions."
At the end of each performance,
Prof. William D. Revelli of the
music school, director of the band,
says a few words. He is supposed
to stop with each sentence while
the interpreter puts his words
into Russian.
Sometimes the audience has
been so pleasing to "the maestro,"
he doesn't stop at each sentence.
"The audience seems to be on pins
and needles to see if the inter-
preter can put all his words into
Russian," he said,

A

WANTED:
Talent to perform

at various

functions

Hatcher open house

I

Informal

jazz concerts

Hospital talent shows
Sign up in the Student Activities offices
of Michigan Union
Monday-Friday 3-5

PROF. WILLIAM REVELLI
... a few words

r

I

IN PERSON-TONIGHT at 8:30
ONE OF THE THEATRE'S GREATEST ACTORS
In His Unique One-Man Show
"The Best from, My Bookshelf"

i

OVERBECKS
BOOK STORE

2

A Dramatic Program from the Works of
Arthur Conan Doyle, Dylan Thomas, Shelley,
Poe, Browning, Barrett and Shakespeare
Tickets: $2.50- $2.00 - $.50
STUDENTS: $1.75-$1.40-$1.05
Box Office Open 10 A.M.-8 :30 P.M.

COMING TO OUR STAGE
JOSE GRECO
and his Company of
SPANISH pANCERS In Person
Singers and Mu icians *
MICHIGAN THEATRE ORCH. $3.00 - 2.50 MAIL ORDERS
MON., MAR. B27th $ .
at 8:30 P.M. BAL. $3.00 - 2.00* NOW

PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

HILL AUDITORIUM

. , - .

I

Ii

in a series of polls conducted by I&M student representatives in over
100 colleges throughout the nation. Watch for the next poll coming soon.

I

HAR

LES

April 12th
Hill Auditorium
Tickets: 2.00, 1.75, 1.50
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE NEW DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL SCHOLARSHIPSf
Mail orders for tickets can be sent to:
Don't forget your date RAY CHARLES CONCERT
STUDENT OFFICES
when ordering MICHIGAN UNION
your Flock tickets. Make all checks payable to the
University Development Council.
PRESENTED BY THE STUDENT RELATIONS BOARD AND THE MICHIGAN UNION

Question #1:

Suppose the government asked for volunteers among college
students to pioneer in manning the first space station, would
you go if odds for your safe return were 50-50?
Yes N.
How many children do you plan to have when you are
married?

Answer:

Question #2:
Answer-

None~

One_
Four

Two
(Five.

Questioni #3:

Sig -Seven or more
Should class attendance be optional so long as students
pass the exams given in class?
Yes No

Answer:

Question #4:

When buying cigarettes, which{
the soft pack or the box?
Soft Pack .

do you usually purchase,

Answer!

'I2MY
Campusg

Answer: Question #1. Yes 36.2%. No 63.8%.
Answer: Question #2. None 3.1%. One 8.34
Three 30.%. Fnr 16.

%. Two 30.5%.
4%. Five 4.6%

11 . %xnlAM *EERE'UWlf .-

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