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March 08, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-08

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T. IJALIWIIN:
iochemistry Important
'o Grasp Evolution

THEMICHIGANDAILY
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN _
~ ~ ', L_ ~ . -' ____________________I .

By STEVEN SHAW
"Biochemistry is of tremendous
import in understanding the most
biological of all biological theories
-the theory of evolution," Prof..
Ernest Baldwin of the University
of London said yesterday. His was
the second speech in a series en-
titled "The Nature of Biological
Diversity," sponsored by the In-
stitute of Science and Technology.
Prof. Baldwin pointed out that
living organisms at the molecular
level posess many more similarities
than differences. "Take away the
secondary qualities," he said, "and
the fundamental ground plan that
we often take for granted is ex-
posed." This "common ground
plan" is the starting point for all
evolution.
Advantageous Mutations
Advantageous mutations, by far
the least frequent type, must oc-
cur over and over, Prof. Baldwin
observed. Certain mutations, how-
ever, are more probable than
others. Hemoglobin, cited as an
example, is an extremely benefi-
cial adaptation which is found in
many different forms of life. With
this substance, entirely new en-
vironmental possibilities were
thrown open for life.
However;, the crucial problem
discussed by the British bio-
chemist was the problem of nitro-
gen excretion in various animals.
This, he noted, is a primary ex-
ample of how biological changes
enable the expansion into and
occupation of new environments.
In order. for an organism to
emerge from the water, it must
solve the essential problem of am-
monia excretion. This has been ac-
complished in diverse ways-with
most lakid animals, by transform-
ing dangerous ammnonia into non-
toxic urea.
x low 4 hanged?
For Prof. Baldwin, who has done
considerable research on elasmo-
branch fishes, the basic question is
still to be answered--"how is the
fundamental biochemistry chang-
ed in the course of evolution?"
In his work Prof. Baldwin has
come to an impasse. The mechan-

PROF. ERNEST BALDWIN
.. .on biochemistry
ism for producing one of the fund-
amental chemicals in urea synthe-.
sis-the exact manner in which
this chemical is formed-is still
unknown.
Engaging in what he termed
"mild speculation," Prof. Baldwin
presented two possibilities. "Either,
our understanding of urea syn-
thesis in other organisms is in-
correct or different groups of or-
ganisms produce this basic pro-
duct in several different ways.
Although Prof. Baldwin readily,
admitted that he was: at a loss
for a satisfactory explanation, he
noted with some satisfaction that
so were his colleagues.
To Discuss AMA
At PIC FMeeting,
Prof. Daniel A. Fusfeld of the
economics department and Dr. S.
Kleinman, a member of the Amer-
ican Medical Association will dis-
cuss "The American Medical As-
sociation and Health Legislation"
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 3C of
the Michigan Union.
The talk is being sponsored by
the Political Issues Club.

(Continued from Page 4)
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8
General Notices
Philosophy 31 Make-up Final: Wed.,
March 8, 2-5 p.m. in 2208 Angell Hall.
President and Mrs. Hatcher will hold
open house for students at their home,
Wed., March 8 from 4 to 6 p.m.
Students: There are a number of
registration cashier receipts at the 2nd
floor desk, Admin. Bldg. If you are
missing your copy, please call for it
before March 18, 1961.
Events Wednesday
William Cook, Lecture: Dr. Luther Gu-
lick, President, Institute of Public Ad-
ministration, New York, Will speak on
"The Metropolitan Problem and Ameri-
can Governmental Ideas: Underlying
Theory" on Wed., March 8 at 4:15 p.m.
in the Rackham Amphitheater.
Events Thursday
William Cook Lecture: Dr. Luther Gu-
lick, President, Institute of Public Ad-
ministration New York, will speak on
"The Metropolitan Problem and Ameri-
can Governmental Ideas: Underlying
Theory" on Thurs., March 9 at 4:15 p.m.
in the Rackham Amphitheater.
Chemistry Lecture: Prof. H. J. Eme-
leus, University of Cambridge, will
speak on "Fluoroalkyl Derivatives of
Metals and Non-metals" Thurs., March
9, at 8:00 p.m. in 100 Chemistry Bldg.
Philosophy Lecture: Prof. John Rawls,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
will speak 'on "Moral Feelings and
NaturalAttitudes," March ,n8 p.m.
In Aud. C, Angel HaL.
Medical School Lecture: "Needle Im-
plantation of the Pituitary for Ablation
of Pituitary Disease." Russell Fraser,
F.R.C.P., Prof. of Medicine, Postgrad-
uate Medical School, London. 4:00 p.m.,
Thurs., March 9, Second Floor Univer-
sity Hospital.
Lecture: Dr. Paul Boyer, Department
of Biochemistry, University of Minne-
sota, will speak on "The Nature and
Diversity of Catalytic Proteins," on
Thurs., March 9 at 4 p.m. in the
Natural Science Aud.
Statistics -Seminar will meet Thurs.,
March 9 in 3201, Angell Hall at 4:00
p.m. Prof. Oscar Wesler will speak on
"Optimal Allocation in Linear Regres-
sion Theory."
Applied Mathematics Seminar: James
W. Brown will speak on "The Real and
Imaginary Parts of the Eigenvalues of
Finite Matrices," Thurs., March 9, at
4:00 p.m. in 246 West Engineering.

Refreshments in 274 West Engineer-
in gat 3:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for Philip James
Birbara, Chemical Engineering; thesis:
"Local Mass Transfer from Cylinders
to a Transversely Flowing Gas," Thurs.,
March 9, 4040 E. Engineering Bldg., at
4:15 p.m. Chairman, K. F. Gordon.
Placement Notices
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS; Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad. stu-
dents, pleasemcalf Ext. 3371 for inter-
view appointments with the following:
MON., MARCH 13--
Hotei Corp. of Amer., ,Boston, Mass,-
Location: 26 divs. throughout U.S. &
abroad. Men with degrees in gen. Lib.
Arts for Mgmt. Trng., Sales-inside, ter-
ritory, or promotion. Opportunity for
MBA with bus. exper. to become Gen.
Mger. of motor hotel after short trng.
Martin E. Segal & Co., NYC-(p.m.)-
Location: NYC & Chicago. Men &
WOMEN. BA Lib. Arts, BBA as Trainees
for Acct. Exec. positions. BA Math,
Soc. Sci. for Actuarial Staff. BA Lib.
Arts, BBA for Staff of Admin. Dept.
Require writing skill & trng. in econ.,
labor rels., math, philo., soc. sci., etc.
Procter & Gamble, Mkt. Res. Div.,
Cincinnati, Ohio - Location: Travel
throughout U.S. after 8 wks. trng. in
Cincinnati. WOMEN with degree in
Lib. Arts or Bus. Adm, to conduct con-
sumer surveys. Driver's license req.
TUES., MARCH 14-
City of Detroit-Men & WOMEN-
any degree in any field-for any avail-
able position.
S. D. Warren Co., Boston, Mass.-Lo-
cation: Plant Mfg. units at Muskegon,
Mich, and/or Westbrook, Maine. Men
with degrees in general Lib.* Arts for
Mgmt. Trng. Firm is mfger. of "book
papers."
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-128H West Engrg. Bldg., Ext.
2182. For seniors & grad, students.
MARCH 10-
Allied Chemical Corp., Throughout
U.S.-All Degrees: ChE. BS:- EE, ME.
Des., Res. & Dev., Sales, Prod.
Cutler-Hammer, Inc., Field Sales Work
-BS-MS: EE, IE, ME. June & Aug.
grads. Must be male U.S. citizen. Sales.
Fansteel Metallurgical Corp., N. Chi-
cago, 111.-All Degrees: ChE, Met. E.
BS: EE, E, Physics, IE, ME. Des., R. &
D., Sales, Prod.
General Aniline & Film Corp., Antara
Chemical Div., Linden, N.J.; Calvert
City, Ky.-BS: ChE. Des., R. & D., Sales.
Prod.
The Kroger Co., Cincinnati, Ohio-
(a.m.)-BS-MS: ChE, EM, IE, ME. MS:
Sanitary E. Des., Prod.
National Steel Corp~ Weirton Steel,
Weirton, W. Va.-All Degrees: ChE, Met.
E. BS-Prof.:. IE, Bus., Ad.,--Statistics.
R. & D., Prod.
Republic Aviation Corp., Farmingdale,
L.I., N.Y.-Ail Degrees: EE, Physics-
(Electrically oriented). Des., R. & D.,
Prod.,.Elec. Computing.
ERevce, Inc., Deerfield, Mich.-BS:
EE, IE, ME. Des., R. & D., Prod.
Sanders Associates, Inc., Nashua, N.H.,
Burlington, Mass., Plainview, L.I., N.Y.
-All Degrees: Physics. BS: EE, E.
Math., E. Physics. Des., R. & D., Sales,
Prod. 1
Sinclair Researc4 Labs., Inc., Harvey,
Ill. (Immediately south of Chicago)-
BS-MS: ChE. June & Aug. grads. Must
be male U.S. citizen. R. & D.
The Tledo Edison Co., Toledo, Ohio-
BS: BE, ME. Des., R. & D., Sales, Prod.,
Engrg. & Engrg. Mgmt.
U.S. Gov't.-Agencies, Atomic Energy
Commission, Wash., D.C.; NYC; Berke-
ley, Calif.; Aiken, S.C.; Grand Junc-
tion, Colo.: Oak Ridge, Tenn.; Idaho
Falls, Idaho; Richland, Wash.; Chica-
go, Ill. & Aubuquerque, N.M.-BS-MS:
ChE,BE, EM, IE, ME & Met. BS; E.
Physics & E. Math. MS: Nuclear. Des.,
R. &D.,
U.S. Gov't.-Defense U.S. Army Ord-
nance Missile Command, Redstone Ar-
senal,, Huntsville, Alabama & White
Sands Missile Range, N.M.-All Degrees:
Physics. Math. BS-MS: AE; ChE, EE, IE
&Met. BS: E. Math., E.M., E. Physics.
Res. & Dev.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
A Grand Rapids Firm, Mich.-Sales
Rep.-churcli furniture, Detroit & S.E.

Mich. Senior or recent grad.--BA Lib.
Arts or BBA.
Dura. Corp., Oak Park, Mich.-BSEE
(2) interested in radio, TV, etc., to
develop electronic products in prede-
fined area.
Ohio Civil Service-Seniors, recent
grads, BSCE, as Professional Engnrs.
(licensed) & .Engnrs.-In-Training for
work in Highway Dept.
WLWI-TV, Indianapolis, Ind.-Asst.
News Man. (Involves some interviewing
in field for newsgathering.) A reporting
job-no writing or broadcasting, Prefer
BA Journ. or some trng. or exper. in
news gathering.
Pittsburgh Coke & Chem. Co., Pa. -
Maintenance Engnr. in Chem, Maint.
Dept. BSME or Ch.E. preferred. Req. 10
yrs. indust. exper., 5 of these in maint.
work.
City of Royal Oak, Mich.-Recreation
Director for community rec. prog. Pre-
fer BA in Phys. Ed. with exper. in or-
ganized public rec. activities,
Wilson & Co., Inc., Chicago - Food
Technologist for res. & dev. dehydra-
tion. BS, MS in Chem.-E., Food Engrg.
or Technology. Some exper. desirable.
Openings still avail, fortChem. B. -
Pilot Plant; Chemist-Fats & Oils or
Pharm.; PhD in Biochem.-Pharm.
Stauffer Chem. Co., NYC-Chemists-
all degrees; BS, MS, Chem. E.; BSEE
for res. & dev., control, prod., process
& power engrg. in N.Y., Calif., Mich.,
Nevada. Most positions req. specialized
experience.
Please contact Bureau of Appts., 4021
Admin., Ext. 3371 for further informa-
tion.
SUMMER PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
MARCH 8, 9-
Camp Wise-Ohio coed. camp. Stan-
ley Horowitz interviewing from 2:00 to
5:00 p.m. today, and from 10:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. on Thurs,
MARCH 8, 10-
Camp O' the Hills Girl Scout Camp,
Mich.-Mrs. Mildred H. Balliet inter-
viewing today & Fri. from 1:30 to 5:00
p.m.
MARCH 9-
Camp Arbutus - Mich. girls. Paul
Hunsicker interviewing tomorrow after-
noon from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m.
SUMMER JOB OPENING: -
Shelter Island Development Corp. --
Air Taxi work within 200 mile radius
of NYC. June 15 to Sept. 15. Man with
Commercial License with multi-engine
& instrument rating.
For further information go to Sum-
mer Placement Service, D-528 SAB. Open
every afternoon from i:00 to 5:00 p.m.
and all day Friday.
Student Part-Time
Employment
The following part - time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Non-Academic
Personnel Office Room 1020 Administra-
tion Building, during the following
hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring part-
tine or temporary employes should
contact Jack Lardie at NO 3-1511, ext.
2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should, consult the bulletin board in
Rm. 1020 daily.
MALE
2-Men to share apartment in ex-
change for 10 hours of work, per
week.
1-Man to distribute literature to var-
ious ofices in Ann Arbor, and Ypsi-
lanti, must have car, (15 hours per
week, mornings).
1-Salesman, commission basis, must
have car.
30 Psychological subjects, hours to be
arranged.
34-Psychological subjects, two 1% hour
periods, total time.
FEMALE
8-Psychological subjects, (21 or over,
for drug experiments).
12-Psychological subjects, two 1%2 hour
periods, total time.
1-Full-time person for housework,
from March 24 til Mar. 29.
1-Saleswoman, commission basis,
must have car.
1-Girl to prepare dinner each eve-
ning, from 5 p.m. til 7 p.m.

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Jewelry,
200 Dresses

DRAMATICS AT STRATFORD-UPON-AVON,
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3 CREDITS - FINE ARTS AND ASST. PROF.
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