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February 25, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:HI

AwlU

NG CHARGES:
Negro Leaders Also Resist Integration

Hayden Advocates Unity
To Push Student Ideals

LEH11EHI - 1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

By ROBERT FARRELL
It is not only white, but also
Negro, leaders who have resisted
any action such as is now being
taken in the field of civil rights,
Edward King, administrative sec-
retary of the Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee, said yes-
terday.
Speaking on campus, a stop in
his tour of several universities,
King pointed out that many of the
Negro as well as the white leaders
,iave a vested interest in main-
taining the present discriminatory
situation in the South.
These leaders, often the suc-
cessful professionals and business-
men in the Negro community,
"will get up on a platform and
give lovely oratory about the sit-
uation, but will wait for someone
else to take the initiative in ac-
tion," King said.
Afraid of Change
They represent a group, he not-
ed, which is "afraid of the chal-
lenge of future change."
In contrast to the inertia this
group has often forced on the
community, the student movement
of recent months is "a challenge
to the old guard-a challenge to
days gone by," King said.
"Our sweat, our tears, our toil,
of over 300 years also sanctify
this soil," the Negro students who
started the sit-in movement are
crying to the whites. "We want
to make democracy work."
Expedient Technique
Civil disobedience, particularly
in the various forms of sit-ins and
stand-ins, King sees as "an ex-
pedient technique for voicing dis-
approval, for seeping to reach the.
moral conscience of the com-
munity."
He says that some of the most
effective support of the Negroes
in their protest comes, not from
the groups created to help them,
but from the Ku Klux Klan, White

Citizens' Councils and similar or-
ganizations.
The actions of these groups ser-
ve to point out to the white com-
munity the unattractiveness of
the segregationist position. Be-
cause of reaction to the acts of
these extremists, there are more
and more whites who stay out of
the entire battle, King said.
Klan Forces Thought
When the Klan or White Citi-
zens' Council, as they have, a'd-
vocate burning down or bombing
the schools if they are integrated,
they force more and more think-
ing, intelligent whites to leave
their camp and take a neutralist
position.
But it is still the part of the
Negroes, "instilled with a deter-
mination that you really cannot
explain, to show the population
that there is no reason in their
actions," King explained.
These students, crying out that
"for once in my life, after having
seen and suffered this oppression
and these atrocities, I can no
longer continue to accept this
treatment," are asking that they
"be accorded the same dignity and
respect every other individual de-
sires."
Students
It is their job to make the com-
inunity, and each individual in it
HfarvardBody
Prote'sts Story.
The Harvard College Student
Council Thursday voted to send
a letter to "Time" Magazine pro-
testing as unjustified their story
on the trend toward conservatism
in colleges.
"Time" of' February 10 called
the re-election of Harvard Council
President Howard J. Phillips an
indication of a "sharp turn to the
political right." It based this stand
on the fact that Phillips has been
associated with Republican youth
groups and was a featured speaker
at a recent National Review ban-
quet.
The letter charges that Phillip's
re-election was based solely on
his "personal qualities ands abili-
ties" and not his political views.
Taking this into consideration, the
letter charges that the Time ar-
ticle "coull hardly have been more
unjustified."

who uses violence or governmental
power to oppose them unjustly,
feel that "here I have disgraced
myself."
They must bring tears to the
eyes of the whites who beat them
into submission when they will not
defend themselves and force these
men to realize that as long' s this
continues, the passive students are
the morally better men, King said.

i

By MALINDA BERRY
"Due to the shrinking of the
world we have become vaccinated
against horror by horror itself,"
Thomas Hayden, '61, Daily Editor
said yesterday at a meeting of the
Americans Committed to World
Responsibility.
This complacency toward today's
horrors has turned most students

College Roundup

BERKELEY - Jim Creighton,
student at the University of Cali-
fornia, led December's picketing of
an Army ROTC drill while in his
own ROTC uniform, has failed
military science. Creighton said
he "had reason to expect at least
a "B."
Creighton has appealed his fail-
ing grade to the Academic Senate,
despite an army regulation ban-
ning the use of ROTC uniforms in
actions contrary to the objectives
of the Army. A
"If I am guilty under military
law, I should have been punished
militarily," Creighton said. But an
academic tool-q. grade- should
not be used as a punitive measure,
he added.
The chairman of the military
science department said that
Creighton's ROTC picketing was
only part -of the reason for the
failing grade. Col. John Malloy
has said that Creighton "failed to
fulfill the requirements of the
course," but refused to be more
specific.
In an interview, Col. Malloy said
that Creighton should consider
himself lucky not to have been
arrested by military authorities
for violation of federal regula-
tions. Creighton's "improper con-
duct" was, grounds for expulsion
from the university, Malloy added.
Malloy said before the picket-
ing, "If I or any of my staff find
anyone picketing in uniform, that

student may find it ver difficult
to pass the course. We know there
are many who might like to go
along with the crowd but we can
deal with them."
Creighton has petitioned the
Academic Senate to award him the
grade he "deserves" for the course,
charing that the failing grade was
not based on his academic per-
formance.t
Creighton bases his 'claim that,
"This' is a punitive grade," on
Malloy's statement.
* * *
CAMBRIDGE-Between 10 and
15 seniors of arvard University
will definitely teach in an African
country next year, officials have
announced.
Although many problems remain
unsolved, including the source of
the financing for the project and
the country to which the students
will go, the administration has
determined the general scope of
the plan.
Applicants will be screened this
term, and those selected will take
a comprehensive seminar for the
remainder of this spring. During
the summer the university will
conduct some type of orientation
program.

against their responsibilities for
other men's destinies, Hayden con-
tinued. The "student movement"
has shown,. however, that this
generation is not dead to its re-
sponsibility.
This resurgence of student ac-
tion is characterized by demon-
strations against the House Un-
American Activities Committee,
Food for Fayette County drive,
protests' against compulsory RO-
TC, anti-discrimination in hous-
ing, an formation of the Peace
Corps.
Unity of Purpose
"The students in the resurgence
of activity must recognize that
they are held together by a cer-
tain unity of purpose--their re-
sponsibilities to other men.
"But why should we accept re-
sponsibilities? Why should there
be a student movement?" Hayden
asked.
"I must value life and, ethically,
we must have reverence for man.
Reverence for man is to believe
that if any man is not free then
none of us is free," Hayden said.
"We must fight for an environ-
ment where men can be free.
Where there is a lack of reverence
endured we must struggle to re-
move it. That is why I believe in,
the possibility of a student move-
ment."
Opposed to HUAC
"Reverence is why I am opposed
to the HUAC. For 22 years it has
operated destructively. Its function
is to threaten the thoughts of
some of us, so we are all threaten-
ed by it," Hayden charged.
"Reverence is why I support
students working for civil rights.
Students can help diminish suf-
fering and they are doing it," Hay-
den continued.
"Most of all, reverence for life
is why I support ACWR. It is
dedicated to the perpetration of
human life, respect and dignity.
Peace Corps offers that there is
an alternative to destruction and
violence.

PERSONAL
Dear Alpha Gamma Deltas,
True, that wasn't the coolest thing
to do, but things will get collore.
AKK F41
DETROIT AREA STUDENTS, BE OUR
GUEST entertainment booklets avail-
able thru Feb. 28. 3-5 daily. Wolver-
ine Club, 2547 SAB. F40
WANTED: Ride for 2 to Boston and
back for spring vacation. Call Judy
L., NO 5-7711, ext. 4337. P39
ALL LECTURE STUDENTS: The Uni-
versity Study Service will be receiv-
ing subscriptions for lecture notes
this week. 9 amn.-5 p.m. at office,
304% S. State. F38
Join the DAILY and see the world -
through an Associated Press Teletype
Machine. F11
YOU GET the finest KOSHER HOT
DOG with sauerkraut, only 35c at the
Cafe Promethean. Open for lunches
11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. every day. F20
THE BOLL-WEEVIL JAZZ BAND is
now accepting bookings for spring
dances, Phone the Bud-Mor Agency,
NO 2-6362. F18
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-One Beta Theta Pi pin and ring.
Call Tom Chappell, NO 5-9193. A13
MONEY found at Dugout Cafe. 1121 S.
University. NO 8-9577. A3
LOST-1 male siamese cat in vicinity of
Burns Park. Call NO 2-1671. Reward.
A9
LOST: Gold Hamilton watch in second
floor men's room in Mason Hall. $5
reward. Call NO 2-4401 Paul Harris or
HU 2-7194. A8
FOUND-Coin purse containing money
-vicinity of North Univ. and State
St. Call at Wahr's Bookstore, 316 So.
State. A10
FOUND: 15 weeks (a full semester) of
interesting, newsy reading. This was
found on the Diag., Jan. 28, 1961 and
the owner is wanted desperately.
Please call NO'2-3241 for information
and find a semester's DAILY sub-
scription as a reward (only $4.00 too).
Al
COATS EXCHANGED-Michigan Union,
study hall, Feb. 23. will person who
picked up grey loden coat please re-
turn it? I will return your coat with
Valuables for mine upon proper iden-
tification. McArdle, NO 3-4145, Ext.
L41. A12
BUSINESS SERVICES
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4647. J10
TYPING-IBM bookface, experienced, $2
an hour. Call 2-9904. J8
GIRLS-you say you don't like the
food served at rushing parties?
Well then, 'head down to

LINES
2
3
4

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

ONE-DAY
.80
.6
1.12

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
39
.47
.54

The Weavers, folk singing quar-
tet, will give a concert of "Folk
Songs Around The World" at 8:30
p.m. today at Ann Arbor High
School.
Tickets for the performance are
on sale at the Disc Shop, 1210 8.
University Ave., and Follett's Book
Store, 322 S. State St.

Prof. Samuel P. Hayes of the
economics department will speak
on 'the proposed Youth Corp's at'
8 p.m. today in Rackham Amphi-
theatre. Prof. Hayes has worked
with President John F. Kennedy's
administration in working on prop-
posals in this area.

A meeting for sophomores. in-
terested in National Foundation
(March of Dimes) Scholarships in
medical social work or medicine
will be held at 2 p.m. Monday in
the 'U' Hospital Amphitheatre.
The National Foundation is offer-
ing 103 Health Scholarships in
each of the two fields. Winners will
receive $500 a year for four years.
The only obligation of winners is
the intention of completing their
education and of serving in the
health field.

i,

i
" .i
1
1
1
1
1
i

Once Again - The Famous TCE
EUROPEAN STUDENT TOUR
E U R O P TA NelTf TheD.fabulousDtouerlth otnco;a c- h frien ds
live several days with a.eFeng ntmilyin-en
abroad, special cultural events, eve+l receptions,'meet
;',sits to . unusual 'le 'wsd.
studenTsrm avel By Deluxe Motor Coach
UiE .55 Days in Europe $649 INCUSIV
Transatlantic Transportation Available'
TRAvE Y& CULTURA E.CHANGE, INC
550 'fifth Ave. " 'New York 36, N. Y. " Cl 5-0594 o"
s

I

The Inter - Quadrangle Council
Thursday night named Robert
Ditz, '64E, as its administrative
assistant.
IQC President Thomas Moch,
'62, also announced the opening of
four committee chairmanships.
Quadrangle residents may apply
for the posts of chairman of the
social, publications, international
or public relations and publicity
committees.
Moch said he would like to see
the publications group edit and
publish an IQC newsletter that
would go to all the men in the
residence halls.
The Council put aside plans to
present comedian Bob Newhart
in Hill Aud. next month. The
selected date, March 17, would
have conflicted with the Gilbert
and Sullivan' production.

RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard

J27

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
BUMPING, painting, all kinds of auto
repairs. Free estimates. Call 5-4042.
J. B. Auto Repair. 318 N. First St. 81
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
MOTHER of one will baby-sit In home.
All or half days. Near campus. Rea-
sonable rates. Call NO 3-5963. HH10.
EXPERIENCED cook would like job
in fraternity or sorority. No Sundays.
Local references. Write The Michigan
Daily, 420 Maynard St., Box. No. 101,
HHil
WANTED TO RENT
I NEED an inexpensive, unfurnished
single apartment, reasonably close to
campus (SAB side, preferably). If
you :know of one that will be vacant
sometime before June 30, please write
Box J of The Michigan Daily, giving
all pertinent information (location,
rent, etc.).
FOR RENT
ARCH ST., furnished apt., 2 rooms and
bath, first floor, off-street parking..
NO 2-8569. C43
ARCHITECT STUDENT desires room-
mate. Large double room. Utilities
paid. Refrigerator, Parking, linen. $30
per month, excellent location, 1108
Hill St. (next to E. Quad.). Call Dan
5-7930. 42
PARKING, $5 per month, excellent lo-
cation next to E. Quad, 1108 Hill St.
Call Dan 5-7930. C41
FURNISHED ROOM for male student.
Call NO 8-9736. C40
ATTRACTIVELY FURNISHED apart-
ment with all electric kitchen and
garbage, disposal. Fine for two nurses
or girls who work on campus. NO
8-7380. C44
SUMMER APARTMENT available from
June to September. Ideally located on
the hill, reasonable and provisions for
air-conditioning. For information call
NO 2-7776. C
ROOMS NEAR CAMPUS-$7. NO 2-6422,
1319 Hill St. C35
FURNISHED Apartment for group of
four. Two blocks from campus, park-
ing space. $200. NO 5-4386. 028
LARGE DOUBLE ROOMS-linens fur-
nished, cleaned weekly. 1315 Cam-
bridge. 2-8718. 023
CAMPUS ONE BLOCK-Modern Apart-
ments, 514 South Forest. NO 2-1443.
C112
GRADUATE GIRLS, NURSES: Ideal
location, 1402 Hill St. Singles, dou-
bles, upstairs TV. Call Mrs. Powell.
NO 2-6460. C36
STUDENT APARTMENT-Two-room ef-
ficiency unit. Furnished, clean and
quiet. Across from Ferry Field. $85.
NO 3-0340. C37
MEN-singles, doubles, one block to
Union. Refrigeration, shower, bath.
509 S. Division, phone NO 8-6757 be-
fore 8 p.m. C27
NEAR CAMPUS-4 room modern apart-
ment and bath, plus carport, air-
conditioning. Call NO 2-3036 after 5
p.m. C26
WANTED, working girl or part-time
student to share apartment close to
campus and hospital. Call NO 2-9731
evenings. 0159
COMPLETELY FURNISHED house for
2nd semester. Whitmore Lake. $120
per month including all utilities.
Phone 3-8406. 0120
JUST ONE MORE GIRL needed to share
house near campus and hospital. All
conveniences. International student
welcome. Rent $34. Call NO 3-5381
after 5 P.M. C29
FOR RENT: delightful roommate and
three room apt. with possibilities; 1
block from campus. $45. Female stu-
dent interested in crazy blend of
Asia-American comfort call NO 3-
3854. C25
FURNISHED University apts. available
to married students and married fac-
ulty at North Campus, utilities in-
cluded. Bus transportation available
from North Campus. Call NO 2-3169,
or apply Univ. apt. office, 2364 Bishop
St., North Campus. Applications also
being accepted for June and Sept. 021

PHOTO SUPPLIES
MOVIE CAMERA Canon ZM8,
w/case. Trans. radio, 6&7 Tx
brand new. Bargain. Call NO 3-
leave message with NO 3-4288.
ROOM AND BOARD
FOR. OVERNIGHT or special co
guests. A large pleasant roe
private home. Save for future
Mrs. Harold Andrus, 1002 Hut
NO 8-7493 or NO 3-0765.
C-TED STANDARD SERV
Friendly service 's our busines
Atlas tires. batteries and access
Complete Automotive Service-
products and services guarante
Road Service
"'You expect more from Stand
and you get i."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
FOREIGN CAR SERVIC
We service all makes and mo
of Foreign and Sports Cars

Lubrication $1.50

$20 places piano in your]
for 30 days. Lessons begli
mediately. $106 month tl

TYPEWRITER PROBLEMS?
Don't delay in having your type-
writer cleaned and adjusted. We
will do it for you while you're home
on vacation.
Avoid more complicated problems.
Brings your typewriters to
MORRILL'S

Nye Motor So
514 4. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858

after, no obligation

a:

Students (men or women), Couples,
Families, Groups on Tour.
STAY AT THE YMCA HOTEL
*"Att'e'g'o'''.. LOOP
s Aa,.mmodaies for 2,000.

323 . Main

NO

314 s. State

NO 3-2481
J102

Is~t* rots: $2.90od up
" h ot motio@s, ,write Dept, %21, 26 %So othWbashAw., Ci~ecago 5, IW

I

A

i

HELP WANTED
DO YOU qualify? Neat, intelligent, am-
bitious. 3 college students needed to
work part time for top paying sales
promotions positions. Call NO 5-8958
for interview. H19
BARGAIN CORNER
BLONDE TABLES, Danish dining set
Haywood-Wakefield birch, Oriental
rugs, gentleman's desk, awaiting you
at the Treasure Mart, 529 Detroit, NO
2-1363. Open Mon. & Fri. nites 'til 9.
W1
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$7.95; socks
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
SAM'S STORE, 122 5. Washington
W1
BUSINESS PERSONAL
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity. NO 8-8887. FF2
f1

good seats still available
Box office opens at 7:00

A-1 New and Used Instrume
BANJOS. GUITARS and BON~
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAII
119 W Washington NO
USED CARS
VW 56. NO 5-6905.
1955 DODGE 2 dr, hd. top. Good
tion. NO 2-2234.
'1955 BUICK Century. Power s
good rubber. NO 5-6490 after
MUST SELL NOW-MG Roadst
hurry. good condition. Call
1960 SIMCA-Oeluxe economy
Two tone beauty used as sea
for a months since new. Leav
at ext. 3023.
1957 CHRYSLER Windsor hard ti
er steering, power brakes, go
dition. $750. NO 3-7241 after 6
or weekends.
FOR' SALE
ESTATE DIAMOND for sale. C
5-6490 after 6 p.m.
1957 SCHULT Mobile Home, 1 b
Call HU 2-3532.
INCOME HOUSE: by a studeni
Gross income $300 per conth.
location. Call NO 2-6094 even
UM MODEL 710 Tape recorder.
2-8990 RM213 3-5 p.m. Mon
4% LOAN-low down payme
assume GI mortgage on newl
rated 3 bedroom ranch. 2252
Circle. NO 3-7967.

will be collected Sun., Feb. 26

11

"- U. i
gO> *

... . conveniently locate
economy minded ... ho
comfort ... that's why th-
ton Hotel is Chicago he
ters for many school
business and professioi
dent affairs, field trips,
teams, debate teams,
clinics, tours, etc.
For your own Chicago
week-end stay choose ti
close to everyt
.. -ichi garn A

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111

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