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February 14, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VE 14, 1962

THE MICUTG A N itA TT.V

r 14, 1962 TH1! 1itri V~A IT UIATN

Malaya Plans Buildup
Against Latent Threat
To Future Federation

U.S. Reviews European Policy

f

DISCONTENT IN SOFIA:
African Students Riot,
Clash with Red Police
VIENNA (M)-African students disillusioned with life under Com-
munisn clashed with Communist police on the main street of Sofia,
Bulgaria, informed sources reported yesterday.
The Bulgarian government confirmed yesterday's outbreak through
its official news agency BTA. Reports from reliable sources said 200
African students were involved and scores of them were injured.
MTA said only 40 or 50 students were involved. "A number of dem-
onstrators were arrested, but re-
C b T leased later," BTA said.
0 G et BTA also said all other reports
were "in contrast with the truth."
The clash was symptomatic of
U Nojeee discontent among students from
newly independent Africananations
studying in Communist lands.
UNITED NATIONS (P)-The It is known, for example, that
United Nations said yesteriday it more than 100 African students in
is going ahead with a co rover- Moscow have applied at the Unit-
sial, agricultural aid project for ed States embassy for help in
Fidel Castro's Cuban government transferring to American schools.
despite vigorous objections from They give the same reason-
the United States. disillusion with the life under
Paul G. Hoffman, American Communism as compared with the
special und said that the $ U promises made to them before they,
lion project would not require the left Africa.
use of "one single American dol- This appeared to be the basic
lar" cause of the riot in which com-
Hoffman said no American ex- petent authorities here said 200
perts would be used in the pro- African students battled Commu-
ject. nist police.

Razak Sees
Indonesian
Aggression
Subandrio Predicts
Inevitable 'Contact'
KUALA LUMPUR (/P)-Malaya
ordered a military buildup yester-
day.
It said Indonesia with its grow-
ing military strength threatened
the projected Federation of Malay-
sia--planned as a bulwark against
Communism in Southeast Asia.
Tunku Abdul Razak, deputy
prime minister and defense min-
ister, announced the buildup after
a cabinet meeting called to con-
sider a warning from Indonesian
Foreign Minister Subandrio.
Subandrio said Monday that
"physical contact" between Indo-
nesia and Malaysia was inevitable
if Malaya continued what he call-
ed a hostile attitude toward In-
donesia. He threatened to give.
full assistance to rebels in Brit-
ish-controlled North Borneo to
keep that area out of the federa-
tion.
Razak said this Indonesian line
was a "threat to the security of
the country."
Razak announced the govern-
ment will spend substantial sums
"in the next few years" to buy
planes, ships and new equipment
for the nation's tiny armed forces.

-AP Wirephoto
ON GUARD-A tank and soldiers loyal to the new Iraqi revolu-
tionary government patrol the streets of Baghdad after the re-
volt. In the background is the rubble of the defense ministry
where former Premier Abdul Karim Kassem was reportedly slain.
Rport Iraqi Insurgents
Take Over Full Control
BAGHDAD (P)-A government led by young and relatively un-
known Ba'ath Socialists was reported yesterday in full control of
Iraq against fading Communist resistance.
Working virtually around the clock, the new men were busy gath-
ering the reins of power from the shambles of overthrown Premier
Abdel Kerim Kassem's regime.
Close students of the Iraqi scene pictured them as socialists, ideal-
ists and fervent believers in Arab unity-but trying to keep a truly
Y neutral course, to be friendly but

Albert Scores
GOP .Criticism
WASHINGTON W) -- House
Democratic Leader Carl Albert (D-
Okla) voiced fear yesterday that
mounting Republican criticism of
the Kennedy Administration's
Cuban and nuclear policies may
signal the end of a bipartisan
foreign policy.

not subservient to President Gam-
al Abdel Nasser of the United Arab
Republic and to get along with the
West.
Nominally, the revolutionary re-
gime which overthrew Kassen last
weekend is led by President Abdel
Salam Mohammed Aref, a 42-year-
old ex-colonel who teamed with
Kassem to destroy the Iraqi mon-
archy in 1958 and later broke with
him.
But the belief here is that his
powers may be largely ceremonial.

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WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
UAR Halts Land Claims by Foreigners

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United
Arab Republic has forbidden for-
eigners to own agricultural land
in Egypt, the State Department
announced yesterday. Americans
who may own such land must
register their holdings with the
General Organization for Agrarian
Reform in Cairo before Feb. 19,
as a preliminary to nationaliza-
tion.
* * *
GENEVA-Delegates from eight
neutral countries agreed yesterday
that failure of the disarmament
conference to produce a nuclear
test ban treaty would terrify and
disappoint the peoples of the
world.
VIENTIANE - The field com-
mander of Prince Souvanna Phou-
ma's neutralist forces, Col. Ketsana
Congsonavanh, has been assassi-
nated, arousing fears of a conflict
between the neutralists and the
pro-Communist Pathet Lao.
LONDON -- Foreign Secretary
Lord Home declared yesterday
that whatever critics may say
"NATO is the framework within
which the defense of Europe must
be organized." Without mention-
ing French President Charles de
Gaulle by name, Home told the
House of Lords, "On that we are
quite clear. Britain will play as
full a part as we possibly can."

v
i

LOS ANGELES -- Secretary of
State Dean Rusk said yesterday
that Soviet troops remaining in
Cuba "do not insure the peace of
Cuba but poison the atmosphere
and increase the dangers." Renew-
ing United States notice to Mos-
cow and Havana that the United
States wants the Soviet forces
withdrawn, Rusk said "the sooner
this source of potential trouble is
eliminated the better for everyone
concerned."
* *' *
NEW YORK-Sen. Kenneth B.
Keating (R-NY) said yesterday
that Soviet influence in Cuba
threatens economic aid programs'
to Latin America and is a critical
danger to the United States. "To
invest United States funds in long-
term, carefully worked out eco-
nomic projects, while Castro is in-
vesting Russian funds in guns and;
terrorists, is like taking vitamin1
pills to cure a cancer," Keating
said.
ROME-Foreign Minister Attil-7
io Piccioni reiterated yesterday
that United States Polaris sub-
marines operating in the Mediter-
ranean will not be based in Italy.
But he reaffirmed Italy's support
for a multi-national nuclear force.
in the Atlantic alliance.-
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Navy,
steering away from a possible clash+

with Congress, intends to keep
Vice Admiral Hyman G. Rickover
on the job after retirement.
Whether he stays with the Navy
as a three-star admiral or as a
civilian specialist at about the
same pay probably will be up to
him, authorities said.
. s *
CARACAS -President Romulo
Betancourt began his fifth: year
in office yesterday, the longest
tenure of any freely elected Vene-
zuelan chief of state, but terrorists
are stepping up their campaign of
violence against his regime.
t s s
KAPUSKASING, Ont.-Alarmed
by strike violence that resulted in
three slayings, the provincial gov-
ernment yesterday summoned un-
ion and management officials to
Toronto in an attempt to settle
a strike of 1500 woodcutters in
the frozen Ontario bushland.
* * ,
NEW ORLEANS-North Korean
pilots are appearing in Cuba, a
refugee told the New Orleans
States-Item yesterday. The refu-
gee, who declined to give his name
to protect relatives, said the Cuban
public is being told that the
Koreans are students. When they
are seen on the street, he said,
they wear only civilian clothes.
ELISABETHVILLE-Two hun-
dred Baluba warriors in full war

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