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February 12, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, F]

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, F

I)

WILLIAM LEWI

S

Badgers Hand Illini First Big Ten Loss

a//t/aerco /ori .an] Oi1.
Forsythe Gallery
2101YNickels Arcade Monday thru Friday: 10 to 4
Saturdays: 10 to 1

MADISON, Wis. (MP)-Wisconsin's
erratic basketball team upset
fourth-ranked Illinois 84-77 Mon-
day night in a Big Ten confer-
ence clash, using a zone defense
to hold off the Illini inethe first
half and a stall to preserve their
edge late in the game.
The loss was the first for the
Illini in seven conference starts
and only the third victory for
seventh-place Wisconsin in seven
starts.
Push Fast Break
Wisconsin pushed its fast break

offense in high gear early in the
first half and kept it going until
it held a 40-30 advantage with two
minutes remaining in the period.
The Badgers went into a stall
that limited scoring to two more
points for each side until Ken
Siebel hit a jump shot making it
44-32 as the halftime horn sound-
ed.
The Badgers repeated their ball
control maneuver, but with four
minutes left in the game Illinois
had cut the Wisconsin margin to

76-73. For a full minute the Bad-
gers kept the ball away from the
frustrated Illini and then Jack
Brens went in for a layup and
added a free throw, pushing Wis-
consin ahead 79-73.
Leads Scoring
Illinois' Bill Small, who led the
game's scoring with 29 points, nit
two field goals for the Illini's
final points. Wisconsins 5'11" guard
Mike O'Melia, offset the effort
with four free throws, the last
two in the final three seconds.

Siebel led the Wisconsin scoring
with 26 points even though he
fouled out with almost seven mm-
utes remaining. Jack Brens added
25.
Illinois now has a 14-3 mark
for the season and Wisconsin is
10-7 over-all.
* * *
Hoosiers Roll
BLOOMINGTON, Ind (JP)-In-
diana's Jimmy Rayl hit 32 points
and the Hoosiers snapped a three-
game basketball losing streak in
the Big Ten with an 89-77 victory
over Minnesota Monday night.
Dick Van Arsdale, one of In-
diana's identical twin sophomores,
added 20 points, and driving Tom
Bolyard added 17.
Tom McGrann scored 21 points
and Eric Magdanz 19 for the
Gophers in their third defeat of
eight conference games. Indiana
stands 4-3.
Closer than Score
The game was considerably
closer than the final score. in-

diana led by only 3 points, 78-75,
with a little over two minutes to
play. The Hoosiers made five of
six free throws in the next .nin-
ute, four of them by Rayl.
Each team made 30 field goals.
Indiana led 47-41 at the half
after a Minnesota rally cut into a
10-point deficit. The Gophers tied
the score at 51-51, but Indiana's
Steve Redenbaugh made two free
throws and Minnesota never
caught up again.
Minnesota got its 30 baskets in
81 shots for 37 per cent, Indiana
needed only 74 attempts for 40.5.

DESPITE MSU FLOP:
3M' Track Future Still Bright
N,

Bi Ten
Illinois
Ohio State
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Iowa
Indiana
Wisconsin
Michigan State
Northwestern
Purdue

Standings
WV L Pct.
s 1 .8
5 2 .714
5 3 .625
4 3 .571
4 3 *571.
4 3 .571
3 4 .429
3 5 .375
2 5 .286
1 S .111

i "
Petitioning for All-Campus
SPRING ELECTIONS
is open:.
Student Government Council
Class Officers
Board in Control of Student Publications
Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics
Union Board of Directorsf
--2 graduates
--4 undergraduates{
Petitions will be available in S. G. C. offices in the
Student Activities Building until Thursday, February
21, 1963.
For further information, contact Tom Brown, Exe-
cutive Vice-President, S. G. C. (NO 3-0553, or NO 5-
0983).

By DAVE GOOD
Saturday's flop in the Michigan
State Relays was the worst thing
that happened to Michigan track
coach since Dave Raimey quit the
team last December, but Coach
Don Canham still isn't ready to
concede Wisconsin its second
straight indoor championship.
"Wisconsin is the team to beat,"
Canham pointedhout yesterday.
"And we're the only team that xnas
a chance at them-not a very good
chance, but a chance."
After watching his team man-
age a scant two second places-
by Dave Romain in the 600-yd.
run and by Dave Hayes, Ted Kelly,
Dorr Casto and Charlie Aquino
in the two-mile relay-Canham
punctuated his description of Sa-
turday's meet with words like
"lousy" and "disgusting."
Time Running Out
It was supposed to be a tuneup
for the Big Ten meet at Madison,
only two-and-a-half week from
now, but it wasn't.
"We're a pretty solid track
team-not as good as we've been
in the past, but we can score a
lot of points in a lot of events,"
Canham commented.
If Michigan wins it, Canham
thinks it will be depth that turns
the trick.
He has only one Big Ten in-
dividual champion (Aquino, who
won the indoor 1000-yd. run and
the outdoor 660-yd run) returning
from last year's team, which fin-
ished second to Wisconsin indoors
Take a good
trimming
and like its!
M-DEH BARBERS
across from
HILL AUDITORIUM
in basement of
Michigan Pharmacy

and then upset the Badgers for
the outdoor championship.
Gaps to Fill
When Raimey, the senior half-
back, made the decision to forego
track for professional football, that
left Canham with big holes in the
broadjump, sprints and low hur-
dles.
Michigan had already assumed
the underdog's role when gradua-
tion claimed Ergas Leps, Bennie
McRae, Rod Denhart and Steve
Williams-all former Big Ten
champions at their specialities.
One area of encouragement for
Canham lies with junior sprinters.
CIncinnati
Again Tops
Cage Poll
By The Associated Press
The unblemished -Bearcats of
Cincinnati, who barged into the
record books with their 37th
straigth victory, captured all but
two of the first place votes in the
weekly Associated Press college
basketball poll Monday and held
onto their No. 1 ranking for the
11th consecutive week.
Upstate rival Ohio State was the
only newcomer in the top ten, as
the first five places remained in-
tact.
Wichita, Cinnati's next oppo-
nent, fell out of the elite class.
Behind Cincinnati in the voting
by 42 members of AP's special
panel of sports writers and broad-
casters were Loyola of Chicago,
Duke, Illinois and Arizona State,
in the same top five spots.
Loyola and Duke got the two
first place votes that escaped Cin-
cinnati.

Ken Burnley and Mac Hunter,
the muscle-pull twins of last sea-
son.
Burnley, whom Canham origin-
ally recruited as a quarter-miler,
turned in a flashy :06.2 in a 60-yd
dash heat for the second straight
week Saturday.
Plays it Safe
Canham is still taking no
chances with the Detroit Mumford
product, though, and is limiting
Burnley to only two heats, the
number he will have to run in the
Big Ten meet.
That's why he pulled Burnley
from the 60 finals at the Michigan
Relays two weeks ago and then
had him float through the finals
in last place at Michigan State.
Hunter, whom Canham called as
good as any sprinter he had ever
seen after watching himrace as
a freshman, is known to Big Ten
track fans only for his fifth-
place finish in last season's 60-yd.
run indoors.
This season he has avoided the
pulled muscles that crippled him
last year, and Canham has been
working him in with 440 legs on
the mile relay team. He plans to
try Hunter in a 300 against Penn
State here this Friday.
Bernard Top Prospect
Kent Bernard, the sophomore
quarter-miler from the West In-
dies, also has provided the team
with a lift. Canham thinks he
can be the best Michigan 440 man
in a decade, and so far Bernard
hasn't let him down.
Saturday he stumbled but still
anchored the mile relay wit a
strong :48.6 clocking that picked
up over five yards on Michigan
State's John Parker, one of the
favorites in the conference meet.
Canham's latest juggling act will
be to move Romain, who ran what
Canham called an exceptional 600
Saturday, onto the mile relay
along with Bernard and Hunter.
The other will be either Aquino,
the team captain, or Carter Reese,
a senior from Watertown, S. Dak.,
who Canham thinks looks better
than at any time since he ran
third in the Big Ten indoor 300
as a sophomore.
Get on Stick
The field events have constitut-
ed Canham's major area of con-
cern so far. Canham thinks his
trio of shotputters-George Puce,
Ernst Soudek and Roger Schmitt
-could be the best group he has
ever had if they can perform up
to their potential.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Cincinnati (40) 19
Chicago Loyola (1) 20
Duke (1) 17
Illinois 14
Arizona State 18
Mississippi State 16
Colorado 13
Stanford 13
Ohio State 14
Georgia Tech 17

0
0
2
2
2
4
4
5
3
3

118
362
324
302
230
148
116
78
64
58

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Inning Football?
Bump Elliott is currently pondering a proposition which might
make the spring football game more interesting to watch this year.
Instead of watching 60 minutes of dull intrasquad football, we may
get to watch 12 innings of dull intrasquad football. Not that there's
anything here against intrasquad games, but they are designed
for coaches to learn from and not for spectators to enjoy.
The new idea being considered has been espoused quite loudly
by Lee Wilson of Detroit, who more than incidentally is a per-
sonal friend of Bump. Wilson's thought is that the clock is a
foreign idea to sport and should be removed. He would arrange
football games by innings, twelve of them. If you find baseball
dull and the idea of innings revolting, Wilson says you can call-
them ends, twelfths, parts, or things if you like. His idea is not
to pattern it after baseball, but rather to just give each of .the
football teams an equal chance at the ball.
For Instance: Michigan leads Illinois 8-7 and each has had the
ball eleven times in the game. Then Michigan intercepts a pass and
successfully runs out the clock. Under Wilson's system Pete would
have had another chance to win the game.
Saves Agony...
You might be interested to know that the actual Illinois Michi-
gan game last fall would have ended on an Illini fumble on the kick-
off following Michigan's winning touchdown. It might have been
disheartening to Pete, but Bump would have been saved from 13
minutes of fourth quarter agony,
Since Wilson concocted the idea, he has kept busy charting num-
erous football games and pestering coaches and sports editors to join
his parade. He almost got a trial run in the Detroit Lion exhibition
season, but Buddy Parker of the Pittsburgh Steelers wouldn't go
along. So now he's working on Bump.
Wilson was. first heard of here when he sent a published ar-
ticle of his which included as one of the diagrams the Michigan-
Duke game of 1961. The Wolverines won that one 28-14, but Duke
made it hectic in the second half. Wilson's chart showed that the
Blue Devils would have had two more chances at the ball in inning
football, so we were against it and maybe Bump would have
been, too.
Football by innings will probably be a longer, game, although
Michigan's two victories last year would have happened quicker.
There is a suspicion that the use! of the forward pass might become
quite minimal. There is no better example of this than Woody Hayes.
He only throws the ball now when the clock dictates that he has to
get within fullback range in a hurry.
Hayes-Type Football...
Someone commented last year that Hayes' idea of football was
about as interesting as watching grass grow and this might be a
criticism of Wilson's plan. Consider the risk involved in throwing
a forward pass-if it's intercepted, you've lost one of your twelve
opportunities to score. Under the clock, there might be plenty of
time to come back.
On the credit side, Michigan State might score the first four
times it has the ball; then you could fumble seven times quickly
and save a monotonous afternoon.
Bump isn't at all sold on the idea, but he is entertaining
thoughts of giving it a whirl in the spring game. He isl currently
talking it over with Fritz Crisler and a decision should come be-
fore long. It's an ideal time to try such experiments, since there
is no importance involved on who wins the game and Bump might
welcome a longer period to examine his warriors.
A personal thought is that one of the more exciting elements
of a football game is the speed with which play occurs. In fadt, the
closer it gets to the speed of hockey, the better.
It probably won't be well received, but let's try it anyway.
Maybe if the idea really smells, we can start a drive to put the
clock in baseball.
It all makes for good copy.

Others receiving votes, alpha-
betically: Auburn, Bradley, Ca-
nisus, Holy Cross, Idaho, Ken-
tucky, LaSalle, Memphis State,
Miami, Fla., NYU, North Carolina,
Oklahoma State, Oregon State,
Providence, -St. Joseph's, St. Louis,
Seattle, Texas, UCLA, Wake For-
est, West Virginia, Wichita.
OUR HAIR CUTTING
and
STYLING METHODS,
will please you.
Try us!
--Tonsorcial queries invited-
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near the Michigan Theatre

I

I

Scores

I

Oklahoma State 54, Kansas 53
South Georgia 66, Young Harris 61
Furman 91, VMI 85
Detroit 61, Iona 58
Xavier (Ohio) 59, Miami (Ohio) 57
Indiana 89, Minnesota 77
Wisconsin 84, Illinois 77
Iowa State 75, Nebraska 54
Auburn 88, Florida 59
Wichita 73, Drake 49
Mississippi State 56, Kentucky 52
Mississippi 85, Tennessee 78
Memphis state 76, Louisville 55
Georgetown 92, Villa Madonna 72
Colorado 71, Oklahoma 60

BE SWEET TO YOUR
SWEETHEART - GIVE
py e
S gee tS
a WIN YOU R V A LENTIN E with a
S gorgeous red Heart tilled with Russell Stover .

B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. Candidates
Members of our staff will conduct
CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
February 18 and 19, 1963
Find out more about the wide range of
activities, educational programs and
relocation allowances offered by Hughes.
For Interview appointment or informational
literature consult your College Placement
Director. Or write; College Placement Off/ce.
Hughes, P.O. Box 90515, Los Angeles 9, Calif.

-oo/ ""

I

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