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May 24, 1963 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


"__THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hall Views Japanese Politics
y ROBERT POUTASSE
Using an illustration of the /"
ere is a perceptibke contmu- Okayama area located on the in-
, apan'spTokugawa era land Sea of Japan, Prof. Hall trac-
odern Japan," Prof" John W. ed the political developments from,
fYale University said yes- the coup d'etat in 1868 to the es-
tablishment of a bureaucratict
orians have been unwilling system of district prefectures,a
it that the feudal Toku- which is the modern government.

"Through a series of political
moves, the emperor of Japan suc-
ceeded in paralyzing the military
power of the Tokugawa shogun
and strengthened his own influ-
ence. The shogun resigned his
position, thus breaking the back of
the feudal era and providing a
way for political reforms."
Prof. Hall said the continuity
between the old era and the new
is evidenced by the fact that the
daimyo, the feudal barons con-
trolling the Tokugawa family's
land interests, were the first to
submit to the new prefect system.
"Although some of the samurai
were uprooted or ruined, the trans-
fer of power was effected with a
minimum of anguish, since the
new government was willing to re-
tain the old officials.
This move, of not imposing un-
familiar governors on the districts,
gave the prefecture system a sta-
ble base on which to establish a
progressive bureaucracy, he ex-
plained.
On a more local level in the vil-
lages, where there was a more pro-
nounced change in the structures
of administration, the continuity
was again evident in the employ-
ment of the same headmen, even
while the districts were being re-
vised around them.

Guest Conductors
To Give Concert
The Interlochen Arts Academy
symphony orchestra with Prof.
Emeritus Joseph Maddy conduct-
ing and Prof. Joseph Blatt of the
music school guest conducting,
will present a concert at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, in Hill Aud.

PROF. JOHN W. HALL
... Japanese history
LITERATURE:
Generation
To Consider
Contributions
Generation, the student liter-
ary magazine, is currently accept-
ing contributions for an issue to
be published in October.
Short stories, poetry, plays,
sculpture and painting will be con-
sidered by a tentative staff this
summer. Heading the staff is
George White, '65. Contributions
may be brought to the Student
Publications Building throughout
the summer. "The Generation
staff will criticise and comment on
all work, returning that which is
not used," White said.
Official approval of the 1963-64
Generation staff will come before
the Board, in Control of Student
Publications in the fall. Students
currently petitioning hope to pub-
lish four issues next year.

Author Airs
Role, Vision
Of writers
By H. NEIL BERKSON
Special To The Daily
CHICAGO-Author James Bald-
win, apparently still suffering
from the exhaustion which caused
him to cancel a previous appear-.
ance here, told a capacity audience
Tuesday at the University of Chi-,
cago that an artist is one who
"helps you see reality again."
"The artist is possessed of a vi-
sion of a New Jerusalem," he said.
"This vision is not based on fan-
tasy, it is based on what he has
seen of human beings. What he
has seen of them proves that peo-
ple can be better than they are."
Misled by Myths
Americans have been getting
away from reality for generations,
Baldwin declared. They have been
misled by a false history filled
with founding heroes and happy
pioneers. Incredible American
myths, he said, have grown up
around the history of the Negro.
"Forgetting that you brought us
here because you needed cheap
labor to get rich, you have come
to pretend that you brought us
fr'om Africa to the 'promised land,'
that Negroes like slavery," he
noted.
Moral Chaos
"The people who have invented
the 'nigger' experience such a
moral chaos that in 1963 we see
dogs sent after children. These
people have lapsed from reality,"
Baldwin said.
"Only the Negro in this country
knows that life is tragic. He repre-
sents that level of experience
which we find in Oedipus Rex
and from w h i c h Americans
thought they had escaped when
they crossed the ocean."
But Baldwin expressed a con-
tinued faith in the goodness in
man, the ability of man "to change
the world."
"We must descend into the sea
of human experience and try to
bob up into the air of human re-
sponsibility. We have conquered a
continent but we have yet to con-
quer a country."

By JOHN BRYANT
Al "Catman" Katz, called by
some the greatest blues singer of
this generation, will give a concert
at 8:00 p.m. tomorrow at the
National Guard Armory, 223 E.
Ann St.
Television .
Alfred Slote and Richard Bow-
man of the University Television
Center will present their "This
Old Earth and All Us People On
It" at noon Sunday on WWJ-TV.
Capitalism . .
Prof. William Hoad of the busi-
ness school will discuss the small
business man in America at 8:00
a.m. Sunday on the University's
"Challenge of Capitalism" tele-
vision program on WXYZ-TV.
Architecture . .
The University Television Cen-
ter will present "Beyond Form,"
an interview between Prof. Walter
Sanders of the architecture and
design school and architect Mar-
cel Breuer, at 9:00 a.m. Sunday on
WXYZ-TV.
Mozarte...
"The Singers," a program ofj
Gregorian chants, t r o u b a d o r

songs, madrigals, a scene from a
19th century opera, and music by
Mozart will be presented at 1:30
p.m. Sunday on WJBK-TV.
'Accent' . .
Prof. Marston Bates of the zo-
ology department will be featured
on the University's "Accent" tele-
vision series at 7:15 a.m. tomorrow
on WJBK-TV in a program en-
titled "Of Apes and Men."
Comedy...
Andy Devine will head the cast
as the Ann Arbor Drama season
presents "On Borrowed Time," a
new comedy by Paul Osborn at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre from
May 28-June 1.
Drama ..
From June 4-June 8, Mercedes
McCambridge will play the lead
role in the Ann Arbor Drama sea-
son production of "The Little
Foxes."
Jazz...
"Jazz: Old and New" will be
discussed as part of the University
Television Center's "Understand-
ing Our World" series at 2:00 p.m.
Sunday on WJBK-TV.

Sunday on WJBK-TV.

IL

Program Notes

I

Across Campus

I

Get that slim, tapered toe and "that great Keds feeling!"
Pick yourself a pair of our fresh, new Keds-in new/ 1962
colors-and you're ready for anything! Housework,
homework, loafing br living it up- you'll
get the comfort and the chic that come
only with the famous U. S. Kedsl
Narrow and Medium widths.
- ,/~5 TAPER-TOE
CHAMPION in classic
r.'nvaf
S$479

The Medical School will hold a
class day ceremony and honors
convocation at 8:30 p.m. June 7,
in Rackham lecture hall. Principle
speaker during the event will be
Dr. Hugh H. Hussey, Jr., director
of the American Medical Associa-
tion's division, of scientific activi-
ties and dean of Georgetown
University's Medical School.
APA...
The spring membership drive for
the Fall Festival of the Associa-
tion of Producing Artists Reper-
tory Company, which has so far
netted 2,000 members, will close
today. The membership office, in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,.
will reopen Sept. 1.
SGC ...
At its final meeting of the year
last week, Student Government
Council approved the following
appointments to the Committee on
Membership: William Burns, '66E;
Scott Crooks, '65; Robert Abram-
son, '64; Jean Boehlke, '64, and
Wallis Wilde, '64.
Membership. .
Life memberships in the Michi-
gan Union are now available for
graduating students with eight or

more semesters at the University.
Students graduating with less
than eight semesters pay the
amount in membership fees that
has not come from their tuition
and may pick up their member-
ship at the Union's main desk.
Patients
Persons over 16 years of age are
needed to serve as patients for the
State Board Dental Examinations
on June 3 and 4. Those interested
may apply for examination and
appointment between 9 a.m. and
11 a.m. or 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., May
27 through May 31. There will be
no charge for those patients se-
lected for treatment.

ANVIiON N Rmi w allM N M IR PM11
MELVYN DOUGLAS - PATRICIA NEAL BRANDON do WILDE m:"MPvx~
COMING START I NG
Thursday, May 30th Thursday, May 30th

F

11

SBX
ON THE DIAG
during exam
week
12--3 P. M.

,

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH LL
(Disciples of Christ) AN
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Open House for new stu-
dents at Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Tuesday, 12:00 noon-Luncheon and Discus- 9
si*n. 10

NO 3-4074

I-mmr""

i

U'

k""

ENDING TODAY *
JACKIE GLEASON
"Papa's Delicate Condition"

0
CC-49iLmw

HELD OVER.

I

THE SCREEN TAKES ITS MOST
FASCINATING JOURNEY OFALL...
and rips bare the souls of an amazing familyl
t.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Churr' School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.

11

11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age,)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours ore Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097

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