100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 23, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'

THE a! IC1L IGAVL31 bAiJY . AEU w.uj

-; e
1EC cceptsO Copoise oni

,, -

T i

Potters Guild of Ann Arbor
invites you to a

11ies

*

*

*

*

*

*

*C

(I

Agree

on

Nuclear

OADEN FINANCIAL BOYCOTT:
Soviets Decrease UN Support

Force
U.S. Pledges
Submarines,
Plane Units

I

N1TED NATIONS UP?) - The
et Union yesterday broadened
boycott of United Nations fi-
ces.
viet Chief Delegate Nikolai
'ederenko said his government
d stop paying on parts of the
lar budget as well as refus-
as in the past, to contribute
eacekeeping operations in The
go and the Middle East.

He accused the Western powers
of using "direct blackmail" in an
effort to pressure many countries
into helping pay for peacekeeping
operations.
Welshers Lose Vote
His remarks were interpreted as
a reference to United States em-
phasis on a charter provision that
says any country falling two years

Kennedy Addresses Press
'On Race Crisis, Wheat Bill
WASHINGTON ()-President John F. Kennedy noted at a press
conference yesterday that the administration is searching for a legal
outlet to remedy southern racial problems and expressed "grave con-
cern" that the wheat growers' rejection of his control program would
harm the growers without helping consumers.
"I know there is great opposition in Alabama, and indeed in any
state, to federal marshals and federal troops, and I would be very re-

State Recount
Cuts Margin
From Victory
State canvassers yesterday re-
ported 76 votes cut from the new
state constitution's victory mar-
gin of 7,829 after completing a
check of 141 precincts.
The state Democratic Party re-
quested a check on 1,892 precincts,
and the Coordinating Committee
for the New Constitution asked for
the recount of 78 precincts in a
counter-filing to the Democratic
petitions.
Greenwood Township of St.
Clair County showed the biggest
error of a 100-vote difference dis-
covered in the first day's count.
Election night workers there had
reported 162 "yes" and 112 "no"
votes, whereas the vote should
have been the other way around.
-Most Democratic Party leaders
recommended that the idea of the
recount be dropped which will ob-
ligate the party to post $9,455.

-nluctbnt to see us reach that point.
But I am obligated to carry out
the court order. That is part of our
constitutional system. There is no
choice in the matter," Kennedy
said.
The President voiced hope that
Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace
would abide by the court order.
Both Parties Lose
On the wheat control program,
Kennedy explained that its de-
feat "is going to cause more dif-
ficulty to the economy, because it
will provide large surpluses and,
I think, reduce farm income, and
that is not in the interest of the
consumers or the farmer."
One reporter wanted comment
on charges that there is some kind
of agreement for abandonment of
the United States naval base at
Guantanamo Bay.
"I think that that charge indi-
. cates, as some people suspected
before, that there was some politi-
cal motivation in some of the at-
tacks upon our policy with regard
to Cuba," Kennedy replied.
s Completely Untrue
"That of course is completely
untrue. It has never been consid-
ered. It will not be done."

behind in its UN dues shall have
no vote in the Assembly.
He said Russia this year would
stop paying the parts of its budg-
et assessment earmarked for ex-
penses of the $200 million emer-
gency bond issue, the Korea Me-
morial Cemetery, UN Korean Re-
unification Commission, the Pales-
tine truce supervision organiza-
tion and the field service for peace
mission personnel.
Federenko also told the General
Assembly's 111-nation budgetary
committee it was "clearly wrong"
to incorporate any technical assist-
ance expenses in the regular budg-
et. But he said the Soviet Union
would make a voluntary 1963 tech-
nical assistance contribution of the
ruble equivalent of $1.1 million to
be spent exclusively on Soviet ex-
perts and equipment.
Won't Pay Up
Federenko made clear that the
Soviet Union would continue its
refusal to pay its special assess-
ments for support of the UN forces
in The Congo and the Middle East,
for which it already owes $46.2
million.
He said the expenses of these
forces were unlawful because they
had been assessed by the Assem-
bly instead of the Security Coun-
cil.
He declared they were not bind-
ing on UN members, even though
the World Court had given an ad-
visory opinion that they were and
the Assembly itself had approved
that opinion.
The whole Soviet. bloc of 10
countries plus Cuba can be ex-
pected to follow the Soviet poli-
cy in refusing to help pay for
budget items on the Korean, Pal-
estine and other missions.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti-Dic-
tator Francois Duvalier staged his
second inauguration as president
yesterday in ceremonies bristling
with guns of his security men.
From a secret hideout, his chief
rival, Clement Barbot, vowed
anew to oust him.'
** -
DETROIT - Mayor JeromeP.
Cavanagh and other area officials
yesterday initiated big-city pres-
sure for state fiscal reforms that
will use a general income tax to
bail out local governments from
their financial troubles.
x r w
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
orbited another unmanned satel-
lite around the. Earth yesterday.
It was number 17 in the Soviet
Cosmos series started March 16,
1962, to test conditions for event-
ual lengthy manned space flights
such as a trip to the moon.
The Soviet news agency Tss
said all scientific instruments
abroad were working normally and
the first orbit took 94.82 minutes.
The apogee (maximum distance
from the Earth) was 492.5 miles
and the perigee (minimum dis-
tance from the Earth) 162.5 miles.
The orbit inclination to the
Equator was 49 degreese2 minutes.
* *; *

NIKOLAI T. FEDERENKO
... Russians won't pay up

4
h 4
I

STUDENTS
LIFE MEMBERSHIPS
Available Now
In the Business Office
of the Union
TODAY: 4:10 P.M.
Arena Theatre Frieze Building
August Strindberg's
MISS JULIE
(translated by Elizabeth Sprigge)
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
Admission Free

PROTEST MARCH:
Set Denial
Of Petition
BIRMINGHAM UP)-A federal
judge refused yesterday to order
reinstatement of more than 1000
Negro pupils suspended for cutting
classes to march in protest to seg-
regation.
Negro attorneys immediately
went to the Fifth Circuit Court
of Appeals in an effort to reverse
the ruling by District Judge Clar-
ence W. Allgood.
While Birmingham's racial is-
sues were fought in the court-
room, law enforcement officials at
Tuscaloosa prepared for the June
10 desegregation of the University
of Alabama.
Gov. George C. Wallace has
pledged to bar personally any Ne-
gro from entering the university.
He invoked state sovereignty yes-
terday after Federal District Judge
H. Hobart Grooms refused to delay
enrollment of two Negroes in the
university system because of ra-
cial unrest.
In other developments, Sen. Lis-
ter Hill (D-Ala) said he will vig-
orously oppose pending legislation
to extend the life and expand the
powers of the federal Civil Rights
Commission.
Ku Klux Klan Wizard Robert
M. Skelton, a Tuscaloosa resident,
warned that if police officers
can't enforce the law, "then the
Klan will enforce it."
President Kennedy in a Wash-
ington news conference said he
hoped the people of Alabama
would bow to court orders for de-
segregating the state institution.
Romney Urges
Civil Justice
WASHINGTON (A' - Gov.
George Romney called yesterday
for elimination of human injus-
tice in the civil rights field, re-
invigorated state governments and
said again he will not seek the
1964 Republican presidential nom-
ination.
But he left the door open to a
possible draft and sidestepped say-
ing whether he will be Michigan's
favorite son candidate at the 1964
GOP nominating convention.

France Announces
Approval for Plan
OTTAWA (I)-The 15 Western
allies yesterday agreed to the crea-
tion of an allied nuclear force
that will have at its disposal pow-
erful submarine and bomber con-
tingents pledged by the United
States and Britain.
The long-argued plan was quick-
ly approved in a defense debate
which was concluded in two brief
meetings of the North Atlantic
Council.
The final obstacle was removed
when France announced that it
would not oppose the proposed
structural change unifying the
various national nuclear forces
now available for NATO.
The change takes the form of a
series of actions to rearrange the
nuclear armament resources of
the alliance, including the assign-
ment of American Polaris sub-
marines and British V-bombers t~o
Gen. Lyman Lemnitzer, supreme
allied commander in Europe.
Also in the new arrangement is
the appointment of a deputy com-
mander under Lemnitzer who is
to take charge of nuclear weap-
ons planning within NATO.
A spokesman for the alliance an-
nounced the agreement in a brief
statement which said simply that
the "North Atlantic Council of
Ministers noted with approval the
various practical measures" that
have been taken and are being
taken for the reinforcement and
regrouping of the alliance's nu-
clear force available for the de-
fense of Europe."
Leaders Cite
Future Policy
By The Associated Press
Two leading officials of the
Yugoslav League of Communists
outlined Yugoslavia's. conditions
for closer cooperation with the
Soviet bloc countries Saturday,
making it clear that the firm policy
of governmental independence will
be retained.
Vice-President Mijalko Todoro-
vic, a member of the Central Com-
mittee, and Veliko Vlavohic, a
member of the Communist League
Executive Council, spoke to the
Central Committee,
Todorovic, an economics expert,
indicated that there would be no
substantial change in Yugoslavia's
trade pattern. He called the coun-
try's trade "well distributed."

Negotiations
To Reduce
Trade Costs
GENEVA (M) - The United
States' main trading partners
gave the green light yesterday to
a new program of tariff slashes.
A far-reaching compromise be-
tween the United States and the
European Common Market -the
world's two major economic units
--ended the threat of a new eco-
nomic split of the non-Communist
world.
Under the compromise agree-
ment, the United States formally
recognized that some of its high
tariffs require special treatment.
The Common Market in, turn
abandoned its demand that all
high American tariffs must auto-
matically, be lowered more than
corresponding European tariffs.
The two sides agreed that spe-
cial treatment would be reserved
for high tariffs that constitute
"meaningful" barriers to world
trade. A committee of experts has
until Aug. 1 to work out where
this applies.
Ministers and trade negotiators
of 73 nations at a six-day confer-
ence of the General Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade unanimous-
ly endorsed the compromise and
set May 4, 1964, as the starting
day for the real tariff negotia-
tions.
The negotiations were made
possible by the United States
Trade Expansion Act of 1962. The
act authorized cutting American
tariffs across the board by one-
half, in return for equivalent con-
cessions from America's trading
partners.
00
UORPTT ION
D %N D

Sunday,

May 26th

May 23 is

ASCENSION THURSDAY

II
'
,
i

a HOLYDAY

of OBLIGATION

Masses at St. Mary's Chapel are at
6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 12:00 and5 p.m.

10 A.M.-3 P.M.

NEW ADDRESS:

201 Hill St., near Main

......

ur

am-

t I
U, I i I

FOLLETT'S
will buy
YOUR COLLEGE
TEXTBOOKS
for

I

I

c

ANY TIME

I

IT'S SO EASY to sell your discarded books
to FOLLETT'S. Textbook values decrease
rapidly as new editions and more up-to-date
books are constantly being published. SELL
YOUR BOOKS as soon as you have had your
exams and get today's top value for them.
at
FOLLETTFS"
MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
322 South State Street

POT SALE

Notice to Catholic Students

SPRING

11

'I1

I

1209 South U.

663.7151

I

I U.

.wnwMammomm

I

.,";::.:41.;1:. ".
". 11 j 1.1,1..:.4
ti
' ":i
: }
't
%:ti
1{
:ti!:
!:Yi
:1: i
,.:
ti
:: ':
:
:ti1
S
,4; ;.
>'{
. 1
y
{.S
:ti,:
i '
:'. of
!
{ :
1{
':}
,r :
.+
v4.
"'S
^^:
M1 f
l.;y
r:
fj
V{1
1 ti
1 :':
!:"
.,ti
stir
5;7
:i
r
Mfr;
Y.':
4
1 ti
1 ..:
.1,%

SHOE SALE
SPRING DRESS SHOES
our famed brand this season's
shoes reduced before the end-of-
the-term to give our student cus-
tomers the savings before leav-

Bhlouses
Shorts

I

Casual -Wear

Skirts

ing for

summer.

Jackets

regular to $14.99
Jacqueline
$990
regular to $10.99
CONNIE
$ 790

Dresses

I

Reduced Prices

on famous
Nationally advertised
sport-wear
SAVE NOW at the height
of the season

I

NYLON'S
3 pairs $2.65

Patents, and calf skins in all the wanted colors. Reds,
navys, bone. yellow, blues, and blacks. Hi and Mid

,I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan