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February 08, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

oC1 THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDY

SAY, FEBRI

Rafferty To Seek Reforms

PROF. HOWARD S. BRETSCH
..criticizes plans
the wide range of abilities and
interests represented in a very
cosmopolitan state are question-
able," Prof. Bretsch continued.
The new school superintendent
is a strong supporter of local
school officials having the rigist
to choose whatever textbooks they
want for their children. But the
legislature and the 10-member
state board of education are not
inclined to. place the important
matter of textbook selection in the
hands of the local boards.
Public Relations
Regardless of these difficulties,
Rafferty believes he has a possible
solution. By conducting an exten-
sive public relations drive aimed
at local citizens and school au-
thorities, he hopes to have his
changes put into effect.
"His emphasis on the more con-
servative side of education, more
commonly known as the 'three R's'
is apt to overlook the major at-
tention which must be given to
the social problems of Californian
youth," Prof. Bretsch noted.

'U' To Host,
Conference
On Forestry
The Wisconsin-Michigan Sec-
tion of the Society of American
Foresters will hold its semi-an-
nual meeting today and tomorrow.
The meeting will consist of two
formal sessions and a Friday din-
ner. The first of these sessions, at
2 p.m. today in Rackham Amph.,
will feature a discussion of pub-
lic opinion sampling led by Prof.
James N. Morgan of the economics
department and the Survey Re-
search Center.
A three-member panel will dis-
cuss "The Economic Position of
Forestry in the Lake States" at 9
a.m. tomorrow in Rackham Amph.
The members of the panel will be:
Prof. Stephen B. Preston of the
natural resources school, who will
take up problems and possibilities
in the field; Prof. William B. Lord
of the University of Wisconsin,
who will discuss the demand out-
look for products, and James T.
Morgan, chief of economics re-
search, Lakes States Forest Exper-
iment Station, St. Paul, Minn.,
whose topic will be the supply of
forest products in the lake states.
Panel moderator will be Prof. Gene
Hesterburg of the Michigan Col-
lege of Mining and Technology.
Name Sawyer
To Head Fair
Vice - President for Research
Ralph A. Sawyer has been named
director of the fifth annual South-
eastern Michigan Science Fair.
The fair, scheduled for April
19-21, is open to junior and senior
high school students in Jackson,
Lenawee, Livingston, Monroe and
Washtenaw Counties. The direc-
torship alternates each year be-
tween a University representative
and an area scientist.

SGC Requests Abolition
Of Chaperonage Policy

OSA REGULATION:

By GLORIA BOWLES
Student Government Council
voted Wednesday night to rec-
ommend to the Office of Student
Affairs that it discontinue its pol-
icy of mandatory chaperone forms
for student social functions.
Acting on a suggestion from the
Committee on Student Concerns,
the Council hopes that this ex-
pression of student opinion will
bring about a change in OSA
rules.
Director of Student Organiza-
tions and Discipline John Bingley
said that the OSA would study
the recommendation.
However, he commented that
"SGC considered the worst side"
of chaperone form rules. The
"negative approach" of the mo-
tion's rationale ignored "the good
things to be said for the forms,"
he added.
Women's Hours
In other action, a lengthy dis-
cussion on the committee's Wom-
en's Hours Survey and its pro-
posals for women's hours changes
ended in the passage of three
amendments which would recom-
mend OSA action to abolish hours
for all women except freshmen,
extend the number of late min-
utes permitted to freshmen women
and extend their weekend pers to
1 a.m.
The Council, however, tabled the
entire motion and will consider it
and the three amendments next
week.
Discussion of the survey and
the committee motion centered
around the validity of the survey,
and the possibility of administra-
tion acceptance of SGC action tak-
en on the basis of the poll.
Cites 'Dismay'
Assembly Association President
Mary Beth Norton, '64, reporting
on an Assembly executive board
meeting, noted that the group re-
garded the committee's proposals

with "dismay." It agreed that the
proposals were "fine as far as they
go," but said that the committee
"needs to go further."
She expressed a desire for more
than a poll and suggested increas-
ed consultations on the subject of
women's hours between the OSA
and the Presidents of Panhellen-
ic Associations and Assembly.
However, Council President Stev-
en Stockmeyer, '63, affirmed that
it is "about time that "the Council
take the leadership in offering ini-
tial action," and that it should
expect cooperation from other
groups.
SGC also mandated Daily .Edi-
tor Michael Olinick, '63, and
Thomas Brown, '63BAd, to inter-
view petitioners for the Conference
on the University Steering Com-
mittee.
Helton 'To 'View
Memory Studies
Prof. Arthur W. Melton of the
psychology department will speak
on "Implications of Recent Re-
search on Human Short-Term
Memory" at 4:15 p.m. today in
Aud. B. The lecture is one in a
series of colloquia sponsored by
the psychology department.

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Dial 5-6290
STARTING TODAY

.......r

SNEAK PREVIEW TONIGHT AT 9
Preview is shown between night shows...
come either at 7 or 9 P.M. and see both...
regular show and preview.

1

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

By JEAN TENANDER
STANFORD -The Student
Legislature at Stanford University
reaffirmed its resolution of last
week on "social action and its
role in the educational process,"
and further affirmed "the right
of any'group of students, properly
indentifying themselves, to speak
out on public issues." It also re-
solved "to encourage student ac-
tion in concert with the adminis-
tration to provide a mutually ac-
ceptable means of realizing this
right of expression.",
Student body president Armin
Rosencranz said he strongly dis-
agreed with Stanford President
Sterling's suggestion that suspen-
sion from the university was con-
sidered as a disciplinary matter
for some officers as a result of
past legislature actions. "How-
ever misguided student opinion
may be, it is deplorable to sug-
gest suspension or dissolution of
the legislature as a proper reaction
to our action," he commented.
OXFORD (CPS)-The Univer-
sity of Mississippi faces the loss
of some of its most qualified
teachers and administrators as

objectives are in danger of being
sacrificed in an essentially poli-
tical disputebetweenthe federal
and state governments. He said
that many faculty members feel
that academic standards have been
seriously damaged by the crisis.
NEW ORLEANS -- Seven Ne-
groes have been peaceably ad-
mitted to Tulane University, a
private institution with an un-
broken, 129-year history of ex-
clusively white attendance, by vol-
untary action of its board of ad-
ministrators.
CAMBRIDGE-Harvard Univer-
sity has asked for a large increase
in its share of federal funds un-
der the student loan program of
the National Defense Education
Act. Peter K. Gunness, acting
director of the financial aid of-
fice, said that Harvard has re-
quested more than $500,000 in
federal loans for eligible students
for the next year.
Society To Hear
Talk on Insects
Visiting Prof. Wolfgang Engel-
mann of the zoology department
will address the Ann Arbor branch
of the Michigan Entomological
Society on the topic, "How Insects
Overwinter: Hibernation in Pit-
cher-plant Midges," at 7:30 p.m.
today in 2009 Museums Bldg.

The amount is a more than 50
per cent increase over the $320,000
Harvard requested last year, and
more than double the NDEA limit
of $250,000 on loans to any one
institution. President John F. Ken-
nedy asked for the elimination of
this limit in his message on edu-
cation delivered to Congress last
week. But Gunness said Harvard's
request was not made on the as-
sumption that the limit would be
abolished.
AT LAST! soa
"MACK the KNIFE"
in that
International Syccess
THEN
T H R EEPEN NY

tRYSTII .- MARY MURPHY.a EDWARD ANDREWS- KAREN SIME
KEVIN McCARTHV' HOWARD MORRIS- WARREN STEVENS* STUBBY KAI
imigMARION HARGROVE-"ncmedtyNORMAN JEMSON " mdww ndSTANMAA
A Curtis Enterpises Production "A Unirsal Relea
PHli IL$ILVERS

t
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7HEIR H>LARIOUS
ADVENTURES I.
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OPERA
by.
Kurt Weill and Bert Brecht
FEB. 20 thru 23
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN TH.

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