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May 09, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TH SHAaYU Y 9. 12111

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(ORAL THEOLOGIAN:
Boulding Cites Malthus' Ideas

Across Campus

EVOLUTION:
Fitts Notes Learning Phases

By KENNETH WINTER
As a moral theologian, Thomas
Malthus faced the "total night-
mare" of how he could reconcile
his depressing theory of popula-
tion with the idea of a benevolent
God, Prof. Kenneth B. Boulding
of the economics department said
recently.
From this dilemma, Malthus
came up with a unique system of
moral theology, Prof. Boulding
went on.
Malthus, a 19th-century econ-
omist and a devout Christian, is
best known for a series of essays
"on the principle of population."
Dismal Theorem
Malthus asserted that if there
i no other check to population
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We recommend that you see
it from the beginning.
"it could be
the most
terrifying
motion
picture
1Ihave
made;"
ALFRED
HITCHCOCK

s

growth, it tends to expand to the'
limit of the food supply, at which
point misery and starvation stab-
ilize human numbers. Prof. Bould-
ing tagged this the "dismal theor-
em."
Malthus also formulated the
"utterly dismal theorem," which
stated that whenever new discov-
eries enable man to expand his
food supply, the population simply
expands until an even larger
number of people are miserable.
The crux of Malthus' moral
theology, however, pointed a way
out of this perpetual misery, Prof.
Boulding said. It holds that "ac-
tivity"-as opposed to indolence-
can remove evil," he explained.
Evil Teaches
"The function of evil is to teach
us, to raise us to a higher level
of organization. Man's problems
will not solve themselves-this is
what Malthus had to say," Prof.
Boulding explained.
Thus, despite his "dismal theor-
ems," the "long-run optimism of
Malthus is his faith in man to
create activity," he added.
Prof. Boulding noted that Malt-1
. ._
Honor Societes
Hold Initiation
For Engineers
Two engineering honorary so-
cieties have recently initiated new
members.
Vulcans, senior men's honor so-
ciety, has admitted: Lauren Bowl-
er, Douglas Greenwald, Paul Levy,
Jeffrey Longstreth, Donald Mac-
Ritchie, William Muir, and Rich-
ard Hunt. Prof. Clyde Johnson of
the industrial engineering depart-
ment was made an honorary mem-
ber.
Twenty pledges were initiated
into the Beta Epsilon Chapter of
Eta Kappa Nu, an electrical engi-
neering honorary. Prof. Arlene R.
Hellwarth, assistant dean and sec-
retary of the engineering college,
was made an honorary member.
Student initiates were:
Raymond J. Ikola, Grad; Thomas F.
Piatkowski, Grad; Thomas R. Bierma,
'64E; Kumar A. Chaddha; Richard S.
L. Cheng, '64E; Alvin J. Elders, '63E;
Lee A. Feldkamp, '64E; Rodney V. John-
son, '63E; Barry S. Kipnis, '63E; Charles,
F. Krumm, 164E; David P. Mans, '64E;
James E. Murray, '65E; Anthony Niewyk,
'63E; Robert P. Owen, '64E; William
W. Parker, '64E; Gary R. Penn, '63E;
Stephen C. Porter, '64E; Mark K.
Scherba, '63E, and Andrew J. Snively,
64E.

Eugene Ormandy and the Phila-
delphia Orchestra, with organist
E. Power Biggs, will open the an-
nual May Festival at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in Hill Aud., playing Handel's
"Royal Fireworks Music Suite,"
Poulenc's "Concerto for Organ,
Strings and Timpani," excerpts
from Berg's "Lulu" and Saint-
Saens' "Symphony No. 3 ('Or-
gan')."
Leaders.. .
Orientation leaders who will be
working for the first time this fall
are required to attend a general
discussion meeting at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 3RS of the Michigan
Union. Those who have already
served will receive instructions
from the orientation office during
the first week of August.
Voice...
Voice Political Party will hold
its last membership meeting of
the semester at 7:30 p.m today in
Rm. 3C of the Michigan Union.
The party will hold a debate on
policy towards the McCarran Act.
Jill Hamberg, '65, chairman of
Voice's Peace Committee, will pre-
sent the Peace Position Paper for
membership approval.
Hispanic America ...
"Science, Technology, and His-
panic America" is the topic of the
Henry Russel Lecture, to be de-
livered by Prof. Irving A. Leon-
ard of the Domingo Faustino Sar-
miento University. He will speak

at 4:15 p.m. today in the Rackham
Amph. The Henry Russel Award
will be made at the lecture.
Soph Show...
The Soph Show mass meeting
for people interested in programs,
publicity or secretariat positions
will be at 8 p.m. today in the
Michigan Rm.. of the Michigan
League.
Applied Math.. .
Prof. Douglas S. Jones, of the
University College of North Staf-
fordshire, England, will speak at
a seminar in applied mathematics
at 4 p.m. tomorrow in rm. 311 W.
Eng. He will lecture on "Diffrac-
tion by a Circular Disk at High
Frequencies."
YDs Choose
New Chairman
Elected without opposition as
chairman of. the Young Democra-
tic club Tuesday evening, David
Vaughn, '66, pledged the organ-
ization to "a vigorous program
of responsible liberalism."
The group also elected Martin
Baum, '64, as executive vice-
chairman and Michael Grodin, '66,
as administrative vice-chairman,
both without opposition.
Others elected-with opposition
-were secretary Carole Crumley,
'66, and treasurer Alan Jones, '66.

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
"Skilled learning proceeds grad-
ually toward ever-increasing inte-
gration and hierarchial organiza-
tion," Prof. Paul M. Fitts of the
psychology department said yes-
terday.
"This learning evolution is an-
alogous to man's revolution. The
progression is continuous, but
stages exist."
In the first stage, the cogna-
tive phase, an adult learns what
is relevant to a problem and what
type of skills are used. Verbal in-
structions are often employed.
Coordinates Skills
The individual then proceeds to
coordinate the various compon-
ents of the skill he learned in the
first stage and to practice that
skill to eliminate errors.
The final phase of learning
evolution is gradual improvement
of speed and ability.
For instance, in learning to
swim, a man first receives basic
instructions and is taught the basic
components-breathing, stroking
and kicking. Then these compon-
ents are put together during the
second stage so that the individ-
ual actually swims. The third
stage is practice, which is the
most time-consuming.
Pilot's Reaction
Prof. Fitts defined skilled per-
formance as being either a man's
responses to his senses-such as
a pilot's reaction to , cockpit
gauges - or his performance in

carrying out such sequential ac-
tions as the process of swimming.
"There is increasing evidence
that many functions - such as
steering a car-are performed in-
termittently. That is, a man's
thoughts turn to some part of his
senses, process the information,
make a response and then go on
to face other problems.
"Man is today being viewed
more and more as a sampled-data
feedback system."
The time a human takes to
reach a decision varies with the

way in which the information is
coded, Prof. Fitts said. Hereditary
and cultural backgrounds build up
learning habits which are hard to
break.
"Where one finds great diffi-
culty in teaching students - be-
cause of either the time or the
errors-one can either select bet-
ter students or change the way in
which the information is coded.
"Educators should consider cer-
tain processes of thinking, such as
making medical diagnoses, as be-
ing a skill," Prof. Fitts added.

r

PROF. KENNETH BOULDING
... Malthus and morals
hus' essays are "not really a work
in population. Malthus wasn't a
demographer; there's not much in
his theory of population that isn't
taken from Adam Smith."
Main Contribution
His main original contribution
was in seeing "the principle of
population as the source of moral
and natural evil," Prof. Boulding
said.
"It represents a very evolution-
ary view of moral theology," he
said.

COMING MAY 19
PETE SEEGER
Tickets On Sale at
Record Center & Disc Shop

4

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sponsored by
Folklore Society and SPU

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

w

AIIIYI
Mtxflodi
TECHNICOLONfr
NEXT
MARLON BRANDO in
"THE UGLY AMERICAN"

N Uoth M N 12 eroMug 12 1Vio~b&e fl 5aMail12
Make Your
MOTHER'S DAY
Reservation
for the
MICHIGAN UNION MAIN DINING ROOM
Breakfast 8:00-10:00 a.m.
Dinner 12:30- 3:00p.m.
5:45- 7:30 p.m.
Phone 662-4431 for reservations
Nlag 12 njMay 12 fathers PLIYI M

The Daily Official Bulletin is an.
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
THURSDAY, MAY 9
Day Calendar
4:15 p.m.-Henry Russel Lecture-Irv-
ing A. Leonard, Domingo Faustino Sar-
miento University Prof. of Spanish-
American History and Lit., "Science,
Technology, and Hispanic America":
Rackham Amphitheatre.
4:15 p.m.-School of Music Lecture--
D onald Grout, guest lecturer, "Opera
in the Twentieth Century": Lane Hall
Aud.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.--Clnema Guild-
Judy Holliday, William Holden, and
Broderick Crawford in "Born Yester-
day"; short, "Mother's Day": Architec-
ture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-Center for Southern Asian
Studies Lecture---Russell H. Fifleld,
Prof. of Political Science, and L. A.
Peter Gosling, Assistant Prof. of Geog-
raphy, "Regional and International Im-
plications of Malaysia": Rackham As-
sembly Hail.
8:30 p.m.-Univ. Musical Society Sev-
entieth Annual Ann Arbor May Festival
-Eugene Ormandy, conductor; E. Power
Biggs, organist: Hill Aud.
Seminar in Applied Mathematics: Prof.
Calvin Wilcox, U.S. Army Mathematics
Research Center, will speak on "The
Asymptotic Behaviour of Wave Opera-
tors and the Relativistic Quantum
Theory of Scattering" today at 4:00
p.m. in Room 246 W. Engrg. Refresh-
ments will be in Room 350 W. Engrg. at
3:30 p.m.
General Notices
The Henry Russel Lecture will be de-
livered by Irving A. Leonard, Domingo
Fpustino Sarmiento Univ. Prof. of
Spanish-American History and Lit.,
Thurs., May 9, at 4:15 pin., in the
Rackham Amphitheatre. His lecture
topic is "Science, Technology, and His-
panic America." The Henry Russel
Award will be made at this time.
Undergrad Women Students who do
not have a housing commitment for
the fall semester, 1963-64, may apply
for housing in Residence Halls at the
Office of Univ. Housing, SAB 3011, be-
ginning May 9.
Scholarship: Prof. Kenneth White of

the Romance languages dept. announces
that applications are open for a $300
scholarship underwritten by the Alli-
ance Francaise of Ann Arbor. It is open
to any undergrad student who wishes
to study for a year at any college in
France.
Student Government Council Approval
Iof the following student-sponsored ac-
ivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
IQC with Cooley House, Dance with
"Bermuda" theme, May 10, 9-12 mid-
night, East Quadrangle.
IQC with Anderson House, Dance,
May 17, 8-12 midnight, Mary Markley.
Events
Astronomy Dept. Visitors' Night: Fri.,
May 10, 8:30 p.m., Room 2003 Angell
Hall. Stephen P. Maran will speak on
"Astronomical Discoveries." After the
lecture the Student Observatory on the
fifth floor of Angell Hall will be open
for inspection and for telescopic obser-
vations of Mars, Double star, Hercules
cluster. Children welcomed, but must
be accompanied by adults.
Seminar in Applied Mathematics: Prof.
Douglas S. Jones, Univ. College of North
Staffordshire of England, will speak on
"Diffraction by a Circular Disk at
High Frequencies," Fri., May 10, at 4:00
p.m. in Room 311 W. Engrg. Refresh-
ments will be in Room 350 W. Engrg. at
3:30 p.m.
School of Music Honors Assembly:
Eugene Ormandy, conductor and musi-
cal director of the Philadelphia Orches-
tra, will be the Honors Assembly speak-
er at the School of Music Honors As-
sembly on Fri., May 10, 3:00 p.m. in
the Horace H. Rackham Lecture Hall.
Open to the public without charge.
Doctoral Examination for William
Franklin Lucas, Mathematics; thesis:
,.On Solutions to n-Person Games in
Partition Function Form," Fri., May 10,
3214 Angell Hall, at 1:00 p.m. Chairman,
R. M. Thrall.
Doctoral Examination for Carl Casi-
mir Hug, Jr., Pharmocology; thesis:
"Tritum-Labeled Dihydromorphine: A
Research Tool for the Investigation of
the Fate and Distribution of Narcotic
Analgesics," Fri., May 10, 6314 Med. Sci-
ence Bldg., at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, L.
B. Mellett.
Doctoral Examination for Huling Eak-
in Ussery, Jr., English Language & Lit-
erature; thesis: "Chaucer's Pilgrims:
Four Studies in the Real and the Ideal,"

Fri., May 10, 2601 Haven Hall, at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, John Reidy.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:"
Harvard Univ., Graduate School of
Business Admin., Boston, Mass. - En-
courage any senior women now & in fu-
ture years to apply for positions as
Course Assistants. Would assist the
faculty of the Written Analysis of
Cases course in the evaluation of fre-
quent written assignments. Open to all
Liberal Arts majors. Do not require any
specific major.
The J. E. Baker Co., York, Pa.-Ass't.
to the President-AB or ,BA (Bus.
Ad. or Liberal Arts, etc.). No exper. nec-
essary. This is a staff type position in
the main office. Will act as Business
Administrator. Will be trained. Would
like June '63 .grad. The company oper-E
ates tone quarries in Ohio, Pa., & Md. s
IBM, Dearborn, Mich.-Openings fort
men & women in Accounting Machinesc
Div. Men for Accounting Machine Salesl
-pref. degree in Econ. (Bus. Ad., etc.).
Women for Systems Reps. College de-c
gree required.
:,Ridl Station WFDF, Flint, Mich. -
Copywriter. Responsibilities consist of
writing commercial announcements, etc.
Degree not necessary. Must have knowl-j
edge of the medium. Position opens
June 10.
Carrier Research & Development Co.,
Syracuse, N.Y.-1) Metallurgist - Met.
Engnr.-Maturity, exper. & solid aca-
demic trng. Candidates interests should
be physical met., partic. in understand-
ing fundamental mechanisms & reac-
tions. 2) Mechanical Engnrs.-At BS
or MS level with Indust. R & D proj-
ect exper. with interests in mech. com-
ponent & system designs & dev.
Ingersoll-Rand Co., Detroit, Mch.-
Openings for Technical Sales Engnrs.
in Tool & Hoist Div. Engrg. degree or
equiv. in mechanical bkgd. Should have
good sales personality.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
SGC Cinema Guild, Petitioning for
sponsorships (grants of money to quali-
fied student organizations) for Septem-
ber, 1963. Obtain forms & policy from
Miss Helme, SGC Offices. Petitions
should be in Cinema Guild's mailbox
(SAB) no later than 7 p.m., May 10.
Interviews May 13. Applicants will be
notified of the time of their interviews.
Action Political Party, Election of of-
ficers for next year, outline for summer
& fall programs, May 9, 7:30 p.m., 3516
SAB.
Congr. Disc. E & R Student Guild,
Mid-week worship, May 8, 12:10-12:40
p.m.,.1st Congregational Church, Doug-
las Chapel, William St. entrance.
* * m
Joint Judiciary Council, Open hearing
on case of James Hill, May 9, 7:15 p.m.,
Council Room, 3rd Floor SAB.
* * *
Cercle Francais, Final Baratin, May
9, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB; Lecture, May 11,
3 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. C; Final ban-
quet, May 11, 5 p.m., Mich. League.
* * *
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Faculty
squash, May 10, '7:30 p.m., Union,
Voice Political Party, Membership
meeting, May 9, 7:30 p.m., Union, Rm.
3C.
WAA Coeducational Fencing Club,
Meeting, May 9, 7:30 p.m., WAB.

Further information is available
Summer Placement.

For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB--
City of Adrian, Mich.-Positions open
for construction inspection & other du-
ties related to engineering for the com-
ing summer. Civil Engrg. students who
will have completed their junior yr. are
eligible.

Part-T ime
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Placement
Office, 220 Student Activities Bldg.,
during the following hours: Mon. thru
Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Bob Cope,
Part-time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553'
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
-Several miscellaneous joys available.
FEMALE
2-Technical-typists who have had ex-
perience on a typewriter with an
interchangeable keyboard. 20 to 30
hours per week.
1-Registered Nurse to draw blood from
patients. Must have experience.
Half-time position, 7:45 to 12 noon,
starting as soon as possible work-
ing through August.
'

MUSKET, 1963 CENTRAL COMMITTEE

GENERAL CHAIRMAN:
Bill Lebzelter
ASSISTANT TO GENERAL'
CHAIRMAN:
Mary Van de Water
DIRECTOR: Jack Rouse
ASSISTANT TO DIRECTOR:
Jackie De Young
STAGE MANAGER: Dave Talmo
PRODUCTIONS SECRETARY:
Margaret Starr
SET DESIGNER: Paul Shortt
OFFICE MANAGER: Bev Katz

CO-ORDINATING ARTIST:
Susan Riley
COSTUME DESIGNER:
Sharon Barnes
MAKE-UP: Martha Collier
APPRENTICE: Judy Berry
PUBLICITY: Roger Leib
Nancy Hunter
'n PROGRAMS: John Fischer
Rosyn Friedlander
TICKETS & USHERS:
Jan Friedman
Barb Harling

I

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CONGRATULATIONS!! OUR FIRST MEETING IS
MAY 16 at 7:15 in 3D at the UNION

r1

DIAL. 2-6264
A Him,"- f" I AAJM

* ENDING FRIDAY *
Shows at 1-3-7 & 9:05
Feature. 8 Minutes Later

MiNEB6 MDiiffii UMIAWutN [RHU
SaRT OBM M LN M i DENEON
Saturday: "MY SIX LOVES" with DEBBI E REYNOLDS

I

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East Quadrangle Presents
BERMUDA DANCE
featuring
MAXIMILIAN
May 10 9-12 P.M.
South Side $1.50 per couple

Can't Tell
ft° '- ji. t You the Title :. "
-SNEAK TIP-.
TH E EXPLOSIVE
DRAMA OF A

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polimplumm"

11

.MMMMMWAMWMM..,

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NOW!

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S4C CINEMA GUILD P'ej4ent4

DIAL
8-64 16

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ANI E OF THE
YEAR'S 10 REST!I"
M''' N. Y. Times/N. Y. Herald-Tribune

Thursday and Friday at 7 and 9 Sa
Judy Holliday in
BORN YESTERDAY F

turday and Sunday at 7 and 9
Rene Clement's
ORBIDDEN GAMES
-0 1. I" 0%- . a

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