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April 30, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-04-30

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1903

THE MICHIGAN DAILN

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1963 THE MIrH1~AN DAII.~
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AGE THRI

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Jus tices

NYASALAND:
Chiume Cites Needed Reform

Haitia

ARGENTINE PROBLEM:

Assert Haiti

Urge Legalization of Peronists

By CARL COI EN
Three visiting Argentine student
leaders noted Sunday that the
legislation of the Peronist party
would end many of that country's
problems.
Roberto Contreras of the Uni-
versity of Cordoba claimed that
the leaders are "trying to re-inte-
grate the party into a democratic
society. Peronism is the central
problem around. which all of Ar-
gentina's other problems revolve,
if we legalize Peronism, the ma-
jority of Peronism will disappear,"
he said.
Eduardo Casalderrey of the
University of Buenos Aires, de-
clared that "if Peron disappears,
so will Peronism." He said that
at present, the party is dominated
by "pseudo-leaders" who can't
really agree on anything, as dem-
onstrated by the recent elections.
They are divided into two camps,
the labor force, led by Andres Fra-
mini, and the political force, led
by Raul Matera, who "has the

same personal aspirations as Per-
on himself."
Carlos Comas, also of the Uni-
versity of Buenos Aires, disagreed
that the death of Peron will solve
Resumes Use
Of Amendment
NEW YORK OP) - Rep. Adam
Clayton Powell (D-NY) said re-
cently he will resume use of the
"Powell Amendment" on New
Frontier legislation because of
President John F. Kennedy's stand
on federal aid to Mississippi.
Powell said that because Ken-
nedy had rejected the Civil Rights
Commission recommendation to
cut off aid to Mississippi, "I have
decided to take legislative action."
He said, "There is definitely no
rift between the administration
and me, but I had thought the
executive branch had the power to
take this action."

the problem. "The mass of people
are being cheated," he asserted.
What we need is a. "new honesty"
on the part of the leaders.
Comas explained that three spe-
cific problems would be solved
with the re-integration of the
Peronists. The large number of
citizens who cannot "in fact" par-
ticipate in politics will be re-ori-
ented, political resentment will be
eliminated, and the feeling of
economic exclusion would vanish.
It was agreed that students are
apathetic and indifferent to poli-
tics because, as Contreras put it,
"they have been deceived and let
down by the leaders." He describ-
ed the student movement as
"watchful" to the situation. How-
ever, he added that the leaders
are trying to generate interest by
keeping students informed.
Alienated Students
"The prostitution of politics by
the Peronist regime created this
feeling of alienation on the part
of the students," Comas explained.
"Peron manipulated the work-
ing class with his social reform
program, and consequently no new
leaders were trained."
The generation of new politi-
cians grew out of the midst of a
destructive struggle, and "it is evi-
dent that the generation lacks the
personal ability and virtues need-
ed to rebuild the country," he as-
serted.
However, he said that the pres-
ent leaders of the Peronists show
"the same attitude of demagoguery
and personal greed" and should be
excluded.

Withdraws
militiamen
Forces Continue
Move To Frontier
By The Associated Press
SANTO DOMINGO-The

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' World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
KARACHI-Secretary of State
Dean Rusk arrived in Pakistan
yesterday for a meeting of the
Central Treaty Organization.
Pakistan is presently question-
ing the value of its membership
in such anti-Communist alliances.
Both the United States and Brit-
ain are under strong criticism in
Pakistan for building up the arm-
ed forces of neighboring neutralist
India.
*s s *
SEATTLE -- The International
Assocation of Machinists (AFL-
CIO) said yesterday it will strifce
the Boeing Co. at Cape Canaveral,
Fla., Thursday and at other in-
stallations in the next five days if
the company does not mprove its
contract offer.
*s . *
FRANKFURT-- Three hundred
twenty thousand workers in the
metal industry in Baden-Wuert-
temberg began a strike yesterday
.and some metal industries in the
state announced. a lockout of all
employes. The strike began shap-
ing up as Germany's worst labor
conflict since the chaotic 1930's.
* * *
AMMAN-Jordan declared a
state of emergency along all of
its borders yesterday and warned
that illegal crossers would be shot.
The decision was believed aimed at
preventing infiltrators from slip-
ping into the country on subver-
sive missions.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
moved irregularly lower yesterday
as trading dwindled. The 30 indus-
trials declined 2.05, 20 railroads
remained unchanged, 15 utilities
were up .02, and 65 stocks declined
.40.

minican Republic claimed victory
last night in its dispute with
neighboring Haiti as Haitian
guards were removed from the
Dominican embassy in Port au
Prince.
The government radio indicated
the guards' withdrawal satisfied
the ultimatum President Juan
Bosch had served on President
Francois Duvalier's Haitian re-
gime.'Fears of an armed clash be-
tween the two nations sharing His-
paniola diminished.
Forces Remain on Alert
However,' Dominican forces re-
mained on the alert. Troops, tanks
and other armored units moved
toward the Haitian border earlier
in the day as Dominican warships
took up stations near Haiti.
Bosch had threatened armed ac-
tion last night unless Duvalier, a
former University graduate stu-
dent, removed the Haitian troops
he said had invaded and were
surrounding the Dominican em-
bassy in Port au Prince, the Hai-
tian capital.
The Haitian guards withdrew
from the embassy grounds earlier
in the day and took up stations
a short distance away. The Do-
minican radio indicated this action
complied with Bosch's terms.
Peace Mission
An nter-American peace mission
prepared to leave Washington in
an effort to bring the two sides
together peacefully. The mission
is due in Santo Domingo today.
Bosch had originally set a dead-
line for yesterday morning, but
postponed it once at the request
of the Organization of American
States.
Willingness to Cooperate
GAS President Gonzalo Faci
said in Washington he was confi-
dent Bosch would take no action
before the OAS team arrived. He
said Haitian Ambassador Fern Ba-
guidy had expressed his govern-
ment's willingness to cooperate
with the GAS mission.
Radio Santo Domingo reported
that Venezuela's President Romulo
Betancourt offered the Dominican
Republic "all you need in your
fight to free the people of Haiti
from the dictator."
By that time, Dominican forces
were already speeding toward the
frontier with Haiti. Armored units
and anti-aank forces moved from
the San Isidro Air Base, chief bas-
tion of the Dominican forces, to-
ward strategic positions along the
border.
Agree To End
Intervention
UNITED NATIONS ( - The
United Arab Republic and Saudi
Arabia were reported to have
signed an agreement yesterday
ending their intervention in the
royalist-republican war in Yemen.
Diplomatic sources said the
agreement is now in the hands of
U.N. Secretary-General U Thant.
They reported he is prepared to
move within 24 hours to set up a
U.N. observation team in the Red
Sea republic to see that the pact
is carried out.
Under the agreement, UAR
President Gamal Abdel Nasser and
the republican government of Ye-
men agreed to the withdrawal of
the approximately 20,000 UAR
troops now in Yemen. In return,
Saudi Arabian Premier Prince
Faisal promised to end all mili-
tary aid to Yemen's ousted mon-
arch, Mohammed A-badr.

Integyrate
All Courts
WASHINGTON (R) - The Su-
preme Court took another desegre-
gation step yesterday by declaring
racial segregation in any court-
room unconstitutional.
"State-compelled segregation in
a court of justice is a manifest
violation of the state's duty to
deny no one the equal protection
of its laws," the court said in an
unsigned, unanimous decision.
It reversed the 1962 contempt
conviction of Ford T. Johnson for
refusing to leave the section re-
served for whites in a Richmond
traffic court.
Other Action
In another action touching on
the racial issue, the tribunal de-
cided to consider whether Gov.
Ross Barnett of Mississippi is en-
titled to a jury trial on federal
contempt charges growing out of
his efforts to keep a Negro out of
his state's university.
Arguments probably will be call-
ed for around October 14.
The case could have a big bear-
ing on Mississippi's politics if Bar-
nett decides to run against Sen.
John Stennis (D-Miss) which he
is reported considering.
Mild Reaction
Southern reaction to the de-
segregation order was generally
mild and restrained, even acquies-
cent, in contrast to fiery outbursts
about previous integration rulings.
"We'll continue to run our court-
rooms like we have-until we are
invaded," Circuit Judge M. M. Mc-
Gowan of Jackson, Miss., said in
defiance of the ruling.
In other states, jurists and law
department officials said little or
nothing. Curtroom segregation is
not enforced- in North Carolina,
Tennessee, Arkansas and Texas
and in some areas of Florida,
Georgia and South Carolina. White
persons and Negroes by custom
often segregate themselves al-
though enforced segregation is
widespread in the deep south.
Tension Rises
As Strife Hits
Southeast Asia
By SID MOODY
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
BANGKOK-The cockpit of the
East-West struggle is not in Ber-
lin; Nor Havana; It is in South-
east Asia where the actual fighting
is going on.
Strife flares all around the rim
of this newly free region, a region
where the raggedest level of pov-
erty lives amidst some of the
world's greatest natural riches.
The wars are undeclared. The
enemies don't always wear the
convenient labels of Communism
or the free world. But the stakes
are clear.
In India the struggle is to pre-
serve 400 million people from Com-
munism and to demonstrate to the
uncommitted world how a back-
ward nation can move forward by
democratic methods. In Laos it is
to preserve at least the neutrality
of a strategic finger of land that
reaches deep into the pro-Western
countries of the Indo-Chinese pen-
insula.
Rice Lands
In South Viet Nam the battle is
to maintain a bountiful rice area
for the West, to keep a new na-
tion's divided people free and to
stem the southward roll of the Red
Chinese.
In the poor northeast corner of

Thailand the United States watch-
es warily for signs of the infiiltra-
tion that has come before in Laos
and South Viet Nam.
See UNDECLARED, Page 8
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BUILDING WORKSHOP
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By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM

"I think we've got a right to
say, 'look boys it's our party or
no party'."
That is the way Kanyama Chi-
ume Nyasaland minister of ed-
ucation, social development and
information, described his govern-
ment's reorganization around the
monolithic Malawi Congress Party.
The government, the first Afri-
can-dominated one in Nyasaland's
Celebrezze
Seeks Action
WASHINGTON (A) - Secretary
of Health, Education and Welfare
Anthony F. Celebrezze told sena-
tors yesterday "the condition of
education in the United States
calls for action" now by the fed-
eral government.
"For a nation accustomed to
living with the threat of thermo-
nuclear war, it is perhaps difficult
to think of crisis in terms of edu-
cation," Celebrezze said.
But, he went on, "lack of ade-
quate education and lack of op-
portunity for education are major
contributing factors to our present
high rates of unemployment, de-
pendency, delinquency and crime.
Celebrezze was ,the opening wit-
ness as the Senate education sub-
committee began hearings, ex-
pected to last several weeks, on
President John F. Kennedy's 24-
point, omnibus education bill.
Celebrezze said one important
reason that federal aid is needed is
that it no longer is realistic for
local communities to rely on the
property tax for school recenues.
Favored Party
Loses Ground
In Italian Race
ROME (') -- Premier Amintore
Fanfani's Christian Democrats lost
ground in crucial parliamentary
elections, but mounting returns
yesterday indicated Italy will con-
tinue to have a center-left coali-
tion government.
The small right-wing Liberal
Party scored astounding. gains in
national elections Sunday and
Monday, and the Communists held
their own as Italy's second largest
party, even showing advances in
some areas.
The Liberals took votes away
from the Christian Democrats in
almosthall the first districts re-
porting. Advocates of free enter-
prise, the Liberals attracted voters
dingruntkcJ by Fanfani's alliance
with Pietro Nenni's Marxist So-
cialists.

.. .-z

The Spanish Department presents:
"LA BARCA SIN PESCADOR"
by ALEJANDRO CASONA

I

Y

history, is headed by Prime Min-
ister Dr. Hastings Kamuzu Banda.
It was sworn in last February,
ending almost 100 years of British
rule.
Defends Government
Speaking in an interview Satur-
day, Chiume defended his govern-
ment's practices in answering to
British criticisms that African
leaders either shoot, imprison or
exile their opponents.
"The British are not the ones
to talk," he said. "I could not
begin to list the number of our
leaders that the British killed."
Chiume further criticized the
British, for the illiterate impover-
ished state in which their "white
supremacism" has left Nyasaland.
"We must now begin a great
psychological and physical recon-
struction," Chiume emphasized.
"By serving as a stamping ground
for cheap British labor our coun-
try has been robbed of both its
education and its heritage," he
said.
To wipe out these traces of
"white supremacism," the country
is first conducting a mass educa-
tion campaign. With only 150 col-

with the hounds," he said.
I U

lege graduates within the country,
"our attitude must be for' every
educated man to go educate an-
other."
Specifically, the government is
constructing 20 technical schools
(almost double the current num-
ber) and "trying to send more
graduates abroad."
Perhaps the greatest problem
now facing the new government,
Chiume said, "is to harness the
nationalism formerly d i r e c t e d
against the British to building a
higher standard of living for all."
Shift in Problem
"Our common enemy has shift-
ed from colonialism to poverty,",
he said, calling upon the United
States to "aid in the tremendous
struggle which we and all of Africa
face."
He expressed particular concern
with the American policy of sup-
porting colonialism countries, such
as Portugal, while it continues to
call itself a defender of human
rights."
The United States must discon-
tinue its two-faced policy "of run-
ning with the hares and hunting
with the hounds," he said.

OPENING THURSDAY

"GONDOLIERS"

!I

this evening at 8:30 P.M.
in TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM

Sociedad Hispanica members-50c
Temporary membership-75c
Tickets sold in Romance Languages Department or'
at the door before performance

I

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Ii

Tickets Still Available
for all performances

MICH IGAN ENSIAN

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE
MAY 2-4

PETITIONING

FOR ALL YOUR FORMAL NEEDS!
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NOW through May 1st

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iU

____

The Michigan Union Cultural Affairs Committee
Presents:'
PAUIIL ROCHE
English Poet and Novelist
in a reading of his poetry
and Greek play translations.

Wellesley Club

Sports
Cyflture
Living

LAST WEEK

Schools and Colleges

to see the

Organizations
Senior Section

OILS

&

DRAWINGS
of

1 AEAH CIiUflNFT

f

1 11

1111

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Ii III El 1,

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