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February 06, 1963 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-06

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6, 963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

6, 1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

shootrng Percentage Plunges

MONDAY NIGHT:
M' Sextet Dumped
SBy Colorado Collegre

COUPON DAYS

By LLOYD GRAFF
The image that lingers on after
Michigan's weekend split with
Michigan State and Wisconsin is
one, of hands batting an orange
basketball against a green fiber-
glass backboard while the fans in
the stands watch helplessly.

The statistics show that this
after-image is no mirage. The
Wolverines have taken 180 shots
in their last two games, 94 against
the Spartans and 86 in the Wis-
consin game. The avalanche of
shots means two things. First, the
Wolverines are strong on the

boards, and secondly, their shoot-
ing percentage has dropped -
drastically.
The Maize and Blue led the Big
Ten in shooting percentage prior
to the break for finals. Since the
layoff Michigan players have had
difficulty hitting 30 per cent of

their shots. In the Michigan State
and Wisconsin games the Wolver-
ines managed to hit just 60 field
goals for a meager 33 per cent.
Against Detroit they did even
worse, taking 95 shots while mak-
ing 27.
Shooting Inaccurate
The inaccuracy of shooting can
be explained by the layoff be-
tween semesters and by brawny
Bill Buntin's knee injury. Buntin,
looking somewhat like Captain
Ahab while, running down the
court, has been hampered particu-
larly on offense. His taped leg has
cut down on his maneuverability
near the basket and makes it dif-
ficult for him to pivot, thereby
minimizing the effectiveness of
his hook shot.
With Buntin battling not only a
gimpy leg but collapsing defense,
the burden of shooting has gone
to the guards and forwards. Mich-
igan's outside shooting has not
been worthy of the challenge,
with the notable exception of
Doug Herner who hit 9 for 13
against the Badgers plus the game
clincher at State.
The mass scramble for the re-
bounds after missed shots has
found John Harris, Tom Cole,
Larry Tregoning and Buntin bat-
ting the ball back and forth
around the rim each hoping they
happen to get the lucky tip. But
the backboard plays no favorites.
As Michigan heads into the
second half of the Big Ten race
they find themselves mired in a
fifth place tie with Iowa, whom
the Wolverines trounced soundly
earlier in the season. They are,
however, only one game out of
second place.
Keen Cites
Progress
in Matmnen
Now well into the wrestling
schedule Coach Cliff Keen still
won't make any definite predic-
tions as far as Michigan and the
Big Ten championship are con-
cerned.
"The boys are making good pro-
gress," explained Keen, "but they
still have to keep improving if we
are to talk of the title."
C o a c h Keen acknowledged
Michigan State and Iowa as the
teams to beat at present but added
that the conference was like a big,
ever-changing chess game with
the teams that defeat these king-
pins becoming the teams to be
beaten.
In a recent road trip the grap-
piers blasted Purdue 26-6 and de-
feated Minnesota 17-8.
Each Wolverine won eitheroe
or two of his road matches but
none of the top individuals such
as Kennedy (137-pounds) and
Rubis (157-pounds) for Minne-
sota and Monkon (177-pounds)
and Gibson (147-pounds) for
Purdue fell.
Coach Keen had no problems
with eligibility and proudly de-
scribed his team as a "group of
fine students."

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The Michigan hockey team, al-
ready a very great disappointment;
this season, dropped an 8-5 deci-
sion to Colorado College on Mon-
day night.
Judging from the type of game
the Wolverines were playing, it
would seem that they were pre-
BULLETIN
Hockey
Colorado College 4, Michigan 2
paring for a real knock-'em down
drag-'em out series with Minne-
sota here this weekend.
Look Out!
At the 6:53 mark of the second
period and Colorado College hold-
ing a slim 3-2 lead, Jim Frolick
of the Tigers picked up a holding
penalty after hitting a Michigan
player across the back. But be-
fore he had entered the penalty
box, Gary Butler raced over and
swung his stick at Frolick.
In seconds opposing players
squared off against one another
swinging their hockey clubs. When
order was restored, nobody re-
ceived fighting penalties, but But-
ler and Wayne Kartusch drew
holding penalties and Colorado
College's Ott Bergland picked up
two minor penalties for high-
sticking.
Upped Lead
The Tigers upped their lead to
4-2 at 12:20 of the second period
as Wayne Alpine secored from
John Simus and Frolick. Just 12
seconds had elapsed before Butler
converted a Gordon Wilkie pass
and within another ten seconds
the score was tied at 4-4 as Wilkie
fed Larry Babcock. This was at
the 12:42 mark of the second
period.
But from there on the Wolver-
ines were concentrating more on

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LIMIT 1
THIS COUPON GOOD

crashing their opponents into the
boards than playing good hockey.
As a result Colorado College was
able to jam the puck in the net
three more times before the period
ended and take a 7-4 lead.
The teams matched goals in the
final stanza as Dan McGill's un-
assisted goal from the point posi-
tion just inside the blue line at
15.14 was matched by Larry Bab-
cock's goal, Don Rodgers getting
an assist, at 15:47.
But the Maize and Blue couldn't
close the gap in the final four-
plus minutes, even though they
forced Tiger goalie Art Warwick
to make a phenomenal total of
50 aves. Bill Bieber stopped 30
shots in the other net for the
Wolverines.
Long Season
MICHIGAN COLORADO
Bieber G Warwick
Rodgers D Dixon
Morrison D McGill
Wilkie C Sauer
Butler W Cairns
Babcock W Simus
First Period Scoring: CC"Fordyce
(Bergland, Stouffer). 2:10; CC-Mc-
Alpine (Simon) 14:10; CC - Cairns
(Frolick) 15:32; M-Butler (Wilkie)
18:04. Penalties: M--Kartusch (hold-
ing) 19:27.
Second Period Scoring: M--Morri-
son (Wilkie, Forrest) 4:56; CC-Mc-
Alpine (Simus, Frolick) 12:20; M-
Butler (Wilkie) 12:32; 1W-Babcock
(Wilkie) 12:42; CC-Bergland (For-
dyce)'" 12:56; CC--Simus (Cairns,
Frolck) 15:58; CC-Stoffer (Berg-
land) 18:26. Penalties: M-Kar-
tusch (high-sticking) 6:53; M-But-
ler (holding) 6:53; CC, - Frolick
(holding) 6:53; CC-Bergland (high-
sticking, 2) 6:53; M - Morrison
(hooking) 7:20; M-Butler (slashing)
17:52; CC-McGill (slashing) 17:42.
Third Period Scoring: CC--McGill
(unassisted) 15:14; M, -- Babcock
(Rodgers) 15:47. Penalties: M-New-
ton (elbowing) 2:30.
MICHIGAN 1 3 1-5
DENVER 3 4 1-8
Saves:
Bieberc (M) 12 8 10-30
Warwick (CC) 17 17 16--50

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-Daily-Bruce Taylor
SWISH-While over 10,500 fans plus a regional TV audience watch aghast, Michigan's Doug Herner
(40) gets off a jump shot with about six seconds to play against Michigan State and turn almost cer-
tain defeat into victory, 72-71. Tom Cole grabbed a pass in bounds and fed Herner for the win-
ning basket. Bill Buntin (22) and John Harris are on hand for the Blue. MSU's Fred Thomann (34)
is vainly trying to block the shot with Tom Douglas (20) and Joe Schwarz (14) both hoping for a
rebound.
TWO DUAL MEETS ALSO:
Ann Arbor Swim Club Wins
Riviera Invitational Meet, 62-32

By BILL BULLARD
The Ann Arbor ' Swim Club is
moving into high gear after win-
ning two dual meets and finishing
first in the senior division of the
Riviera Invitational Meet in In-
dianapolis last weekend.
Last Thursday night the Swim
Club, composed mainly of Michi-
gan's national women's college
championship team members, de-
feated the Indianapolis Athletic
Club, 66-28. Friday night the Ann
Arbor mermaids downed the
Riviera Swim Club, 62-32. This
was only the third dual meet loss
for Riviera in the last 10 years. -
In the two dual meets, Pam
Swart won four first places, Suzy
Thrasher three, Peggi Wirth two,
Cynthia Osgood two, and Donna
Conklin one. Besides this, Miss.
Osgood was o nfour winning re-
lays, Miss Thrasher on three, and
Miss Swart, Miss Wirth, and Miss
Conklin were on two each.
Wins Diving
In diving events, Micki King
was first against Riviera and June
Mori was first against the Indian-
apolis Athletic Club. Both Miss
King and Miss Mori were second
when the .other was first.-
The two dual meet victories were
impressive but the climax to the
weekend was the two-day Riviera
Invitational Swimming Meet. This
was an age-group meet with over

1500 entries. Coach Rose Marie
Dawson's swimmers dominated the,
senior' division.
Suzy Thrasher took a first placeI
and three second places. Her first
place was in the 200-yd. butter-:
fly. With. a time of 2:19.5, she
was only 2.7 seconds off the na-.
tional record.
Miss Thrasher's second, places
were in the 100-yd. butterfly, the.
500-yd. freestyle, and the 400-yd.
individual medley. Her time in the
butterfly of 1:02.8 put her second
to Kathy Ellis who holds the
American women's citizen national,
record. The fastest time recorded
in the United States by a woman
is 59.2.
Relays Victorious
Ann Arbor's 400-yd. medley re-.
lay (Osgood, Conklin, Porter, and
Thrasher) and the 400-yd. free-
style relay (Wirth; Osgood, Conk-
lin, and Thrasher) were first. In
the medley relay, the Ann Arbor
team lowered their time consider-
ably from the Friday night' dual
meet 'with Riviera to the Sunday
Riviera Invitational.:
Riviera won the event Friday
night with a time of 4:33.3. This
team had two of the members of
the national championship AAU
team of .last April on it. But Sun-
day the Ann Arbor team lowered
their time to 4:27.7 and beat
Riviera.

Pam Swart wasn't available to
compete in the Riviera Invitation-
al. But if she had, the time on
the medley relay could have been
lowered by almost three seconds.
In the freestyle relay, her absence
prevented Ann Arbor from track-
ing the 4:00.0 barrier. This is a
fantastic time since it means all
four swimmers are at or under the
60.0 second mark each for 100
yards.
Smashes Record
The only other competition for
the women swimmers during the
semester break was the State AAU
One-Mile Championship in De-
troit. Miss Thrasher smashed her
previous state record by over 40
seconds to win the event. She was
followed by Miss Swart, Miss
Wirth, and Miss Conklin. Winning
time was 21:15.6, exactly a minute
faster than second place.
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Theology 102-Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith
This course will treat the fundamental points
of religion and the basic doctrines of the
Christian faith. It is open to anyone and
everyone, Catholic and non-Catholic alike.
Time: Tuesday and Thursday at 10 a.m.
2-4-8 p, m:
Text: Handbook of the Catholic Faith
Instructor: Msgr. John F. Bradley
Theology 201-The Foundations of Christianity
Presents the preambles of Christian belief. The
Nature and Existence of God. The spiritual
nature of men. The meaning and possibility
of Revelation and Miracles. The life of
Christ. The Foundation of the Church.
Time: Monday at 2-4-7 p.m.
Text: The Foundations of Christian Belief
Instructor: Rev. Alexander J. Brunett
Miss Carol Kurth
Theology 302-Studies in Sacred Scripture
The Mystery of Jesus. An Introduction to the
4 Gospels. Eternal and internal evidence for
the life of Christ. The Biblical significance
of the life of Christ.'
Time: Thursday at 1-3-7 p.m.
Text: A Guide to Reading the Bible
Instructors: Rev. Alexander J. Brunett
Mr. Robert Reider
Philosophy 102-Scholastic Philosophy
A survey of Modern and Contemporary
philosophical thought in comparison with
Thomistic principles,
Time: Monday at 8 p.m.
Text: Makers of the Modern Mind-Neill
Instructor: Mr. Ed Hurley
Philosophy 202-Philosophical Issues in Social Sciences
Discussion of Christian Philosophicalprinciples,
in relation to contemporary psychological and
sociological issues, such as determinism and
free will, cultural relatively and religious
dogmatism.
Time: Tuesday, at 7 p.m.
Text: The Third Revolution-Karl Stern
Instructor: Mr. Donald Warwick
History 101-History of the Primitive Church
Traces the growth of the infant Church from
the time of the apostles through the 4th
century. The Persecutions. The Development
of the Sacramental rites. Early Christio Art.
Time: Tuesday at 1-3-7 p.m,
Text: The Church of the Apostles and

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