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March 24, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Ii

NEDICT CITES WEAKNESS:
Batteries Get Extra Practice

Big Ten Hockey Development Sought

By TOM WEINBERG

" I

Game called off. Pitchers and
chers report to the field house
practice."
[ichigan baseball coach Moby
iedict took advantage of the
.cellation of yesterday's post-
ied contest with Western Mich-
n to concentrate all his efforts
the two areas of the team
ch currently concern him most.
On the whole, the pitching has
n disappointing and the catch-
haven't done a Job," Benedict
d. "With the catchers, it's not
hitting that concerns me," he

commented about the two sopho-
more backstops, Chuck Adams and
Pete Adams. "They've had trouble
throwing runners out. They don't
step out to throw fast enough."
Don't Panic
Benedict said that he wasn't
ready to hit the panic button
about the catchers, and he would
"stick with them till they prove
altogether that they can't do a
job." He thus dispelled, at least
temporarily, rumors that the
team's leading hitter, rightfielder
Ron Tate would be moved in be-
hind the plate.

I

THIS EVENING at 8 o'clock in its.
Program for faculty and graduate students-
HILLEL PRESENTS

As far as the pitching is con-
cerned, Benedict reiterated a point
which he has maintained all sea-
son: "Some of these boys who sup-
posedly pitched for us last year
have shown me nothing" so far."
Benedict said he regretted that
the game had been called off yes-
terday, since "it would have given
everyone a chance to see just who
can and who can't pitch."
Fisher vs. Illini
Fritz Fisher has been outstand-
ing. He's the key man on the
mound staff and he'll undoubtedly
throw against Illinois," Benedict
said in reference to Friday's all-
important conference opener with
the Big Ten champions.
From Champaign, the Wolver-
ines travel to Purdue for the first
conference doubleheader. "I could
not even begin to say who'll pitch
down there," he said. "Dave Roe-
buck and Jim Bobel still have to
show more."
In talking of his three sopho-
more hurlers, Benedict called lefty
Clyde Barnhart "relatively en-
couraging his last time out. Jerry
Hribar threw pretty well the two
innings he pitched Saturday, but
he got careless and smack, they hit
one out of the park," he said, re-
ferring to Jim Fuller's eight inning
pinch homer at Central Michigan
Saturday.
"As for Pemberton, he's still got
to show me he wants to play ball,"
Benedict remarked.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first in a two-part series dealing
with college hockey in " theeMid-
west area. Today's story analyzes
the present state of hockey in the
Big Ten.)
By STAN KUKLA
"Canadian hockey teams aren't
as strong as they used to be and
the boys aren't as interested in
playing as before."
Michigan hockey Coach Al Ren-
frew, working with this statement,
which he formulated as a basic
premise, explains why he has put
the wheels in motion to form a
Big Ten hockey league.
The Canadian boy is slowly be-
ing drawn away from the ice by
such factors as more schooling, a
wider assortment of sports and
entertainment-in short, a more
diversified life. Hockey is no long-
er the center of his life and so
the sport has become static in
Canada.
Different Story
But not so in other countries.
Renfrew cites the European coun-
tries as examples of the general
increase in the popularity of hock-
ey.
"They play an exciting brand
of hockey in Europe. Look at how
well Sweden did in the World
Amateur Championships (they
finished second to the Russians by
dropping the last game of the
tourney to Czechoslovakia). They
have all local talent-and a cou-
ple of years ago they couldn't
even skate."

DR. DAVID BAKAN, Professor of Psychology
at the University of Chicago
on
"THE JEWISH CONTEST OF
FREUD'S PSYCHOANALYSIS"
Discussants: Professors Frederick Wyatt
and Norton H. Nezvinsky

The hockey won't be as good in
the Big Ten league as it is now
in the Western Collegiate Hockey
Association, but Renfrew feels
that it will develop. He points to
Denver as an example of the rate
at which hockey and hockey play-
ers improve.
Fast Rise
Denver's first season saw the
Pioneers, coached by Vern Turn-
er, lose 14 and win only four of
18 games. The next year the Den-
ver squad had a .500 season-win-
ning 11, losing 11, and tieing one.
In their third season, the Pioneers
were 18-6-1.
Renfrew feels that the growth
rate of teams composed of Ameri-
cans-as would be the teams in
the Big Ten-would experience a
corresponding growth and profi-
ciency.
Hockey is on the rise in the
United States and Renfrew feels
that the establishment of an all-
American college hockey league
will add fuel to the fire.
No Interest
"Right now, not too many boys
are interested in hockey. And who
can blame them? They work hard
at the game through high school
and then what? They have no
place to go.
"But if the colleges are available
to them, they are going to want to
play. Those who wouldn't want to
play before because they had no
place to go now have a place to
go and thus they will play.
"Look at the teams that played
in the NCAA tournament in Bos-
ton. The Eastern teams, Boston
College and Clarkson, were no
match for Denver and North Da-
kota, but in that consolation game
Saturday afternoon, I saw some
of the finest hockey I have ever
seen-and only American boys
were on the teams.
Won't Suffer
"I'm sure that hockey will not
suffer for quality, once the league
gets started," Renfrew vehement-
ly emphasized.
The move to restrict hockey
scholarships to Americans was not
Major League
Standings

the only move Renfrew made in
the process of establishing a Big
Ten league. He has also dropped
the Denver team from Michigan's
hockey schedule for, the '63-'64
season and has added a game
with the Ohio State Hockey Club.
Renfrew's plans for a Big Ten
league are all set; now he just
needs some teams to fill the
league. And herein lies the prob-
lem.
Nucleus Exists
Of course, the nucleus of the
league exists in the form of the
teams from Michigan State, Min-
nesota, and Michigan. Amo Bes-
sone and John Mariucci-hockey
coaches at State and Minnesota,
respectively-are solidly behind
Renfrew's move.
"Renfrew's move was a step in
the right direction," said Bessone.
"I hope it comes through all right.
As far as the present situation
goes, things look good.
"In fact, the future of the
league is very bright. We have
five schools now and I'm sure
more will be coming," Bessone
continued. "There will be much
more interest in the sport once
everyone is in the same league."
Same Story
Mariucci expressed almost the
same sentiments. "This is definite-
ly a step in the right direction be-
cause it will give the high school
and other hockey players a goal
to reach, and thus hold more in-
terest for them.
"This is really a good thing,"
he continued. "This league will
help our national and Olympic
teams and just generally increase
the popular appeal of the sport."

Mariucci feels that the forma-'
tion of hockey teams will greatly
increase hockey in that area be-
cause the men who play on the
team will be more inclined to stay
in the area and help further the
sport.
"That was what the Big Ten
has needed," said Mariucci.
Others
Bessone mentioned that five
schools would be in the league.
Ohio State and Wisconsin are the
other schools added to the nucleus
now in existence.
Wisconsin has a team but Coach
Arthur Thompson feels that it will
not be ready for competition for
at least a year. The team was
started on a freshman basis, even
though there were some upper-
classmen on the team.
"We're still weak," Thompson
emphasized, "but we are building.
Wisconsin, being so close to
Canada and other hockey playing
regions, has a reserve of players
from which it can build up its
team.
At Disadvantage
Ohio State doesn't have that ad-
vantage. The only place in Ohio
that has any system of minor
hockey is the greater Cleveland
area.
The Hockey Club does not have
varsity status yet, but the question
will be brought up in May aid,
from every indication, it will be
granted the higher position.
Making the switch from clubto
varsity standing brings up the ma-
jor issue in the formation of the
Big Ten hockey league. Under con-
ference rules, each schools have
only so many tenders for all sports,

and if a sport is added, other
sports are going to have to suffer
loss of some tenders.
Going to Hurt
This is going to hurt the schools
that don't have hockey teams in
existence. This means that most
of the Conference schools will be
reluctant to add another sport.
The issue of tenders is a factor
opposing the formation of a Big
Ten hockey league. The lack of
facilities is another.
Iowa and Indiana have no- fa-
cilities at all and Purdue has very
limited facilities,-but Northwestern
is "experimenting" with intra-
mural hockey.
Add Illini
Illinois is the only other Big
Ten school that has any semblance
of hockey. There has been a long
tradition of hockey at the Cham-
paign school.
Vic Heyliger, who coached at
Michigan from the '44-'45 season
to the '56-'57, has also coached at
Illinois. Bessone played under
Heyliger at Illinois.
Illinois Athletic Director Doug-
las Mills does not foresee a var-
sity hockey team in the near fu-
ture, however. He feels that the
present state of amateur hockey in
Illinois can support the sport.
The future of hockey in the Big
Ten does look bright-for five
schools. The other five have shown
no interest and prefer to hold back
and see how the pioneer schools-
Michigan, Michigan State, Minne-
sota, Ohio State, and Wisconsin
make out.
If they are successful, the Big
Ten may yet see a league compos-
ed of all the member schools.

B'nai
Hillel

B'rith
Foundation

1429 Hill Street

Tea will be served after the lecture

I 1

First to Checkmate-Then to Spring Weekend

.1i

r

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Baltimore
Kansas City
Chicago
New York
Boston
Detroit
Los Angeles
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota.

W
8
8
6
6
6
6
6
4
4
4

L
4
5
4
4
5
7
7
6
7
9

Pct.
.667
.615
.600
.600
.545
.462
.462
.400
.364
.308

GB
2%
31/
4%
4

SPORT
SHIRTS
3.95

. t~
. '

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 3, Detroit 1
Los Angeles 5, Washington 4
Baltimore 1, Minnesota 0
Boston at New York (ppd.)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Detroit
Boston at Cleveland (n)
Minnesota at Washington (n)
Kansas City at Baltimore (n)
Chicago at NewYork
NATIONAL LEAGUE

White, Black, Blue

San Francisco
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
x-Milwaukee
Philadelphia
x-Los Angeles
Chicago
Cincinnati
New York
Houston

W L Pct.
9 5 .643
9 5 .643
7 5 .583
8 6 .571
7 6 .538
7 7 .500
7 7 .500
5 6, .455
4 9 .308
4 11 .267

GB
1
1
2
2
2112
2%
5%

Western
JEANS
3.95

x-Night games on coast.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 7, Pittsburgh 2
St. Louis 5, Houston 0
San Francisco 4, Cincinnati 2
Milwaukee at Los Angeles (night)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Chicago
St. Louis at San Francisco
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (n)
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
Cincinnati at Los Angeles (n)

CHECKMATE

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THAT GREAT STREET !

II -

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* - 131

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II I

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