100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, A'.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, A

esearchers Detect Gas Leaks

Norton Underlines Need
For Authority Statement

GATLINBURG, Tenn-Univer-
sity researchers have arrived at
a system to detect gas leaks in
the giant Saturn rocket by use of
a radioactive gas.
The researchers say that the
system "appears to be feasible" in
the rocket, which successfully com-
pleted its fourth flight last Thurs-
day.
Three of them reported at the
Oak Ridge Radioisotope Confer-
ence here that a radioactive gas
known as krypton 85 would re-
veal the presence of leaks quite
well in the complex "plumbing" of
the 183-foot high space vehicle.
Dissolved in the fuel, it would
seep through leaks and could be
detected in minute quantities by
the radiation it gave off-reveal-
ing the leak itself.
Professors Geza L. Gyorey and
Lloyd; E. Brownell and Michael
York, Grad, of the nuclear en-o
gineering department said they
will continue study under the Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration project to determine
how well the gas can be dissolved
in the various fuels and propel-
lants that will be used in the
Saturn.
Because there was no satisfac-
- tory way to detect leaks in a
vehicle either on the launching
pad or in flight, they proposed
this means of leak detection to
NASA last year and were given
the contract to find out if it would
work.
The University engineers re-
5ported their next step is to see
- how well krypton dissolves in the
,e propellants.
They also plan investigations to
er determine how much krypton will
te be necessary for larger rockets. An
er associated problem is how much
e. of the radioactive gas can be used
ie safely.
Lecture To VYizv
a Future Education
1-
f- Prof. Myron Lieberman of Hof-
y, stra College in New York will
as speak on "The Next Ten Years
>f in Education" at 8 p.m. today in
the Multi-Purpose Rm. of the
o- student Activities building of the
g, Dearborn Campus. Prof. Leiber-
ir man, a consultant to the New
21 Rochelle, N.Y., school system, is
d a leading proponent of the ideaj
al that local control of schools is an
obsolete concept. '

By MARY LOU BUTCHER
"In the past Assembly has been
a nonentity on this campus," retir-
ing Assembly President Mary Beth
Norton, '64, said in her farewell
address at Monday's AHC meeting.
"Students have notbeen aware
of Assembly and for this reason, it
needs to have a definite statement
of authority," she asserted. "An
organization needs a reason to
exist and that reason is the power
which it can exercise," she added.
"Student Government Council
faces a similar problem-it too
needs more power.
Self-Govern
"We must fight to govern our
own conduct in the residence halls
and on campus; we must show
maturity and the ability to gov-
ern ourselves," Miss Norton as-
serted.
"My philosophy during my year
as Assembly president has been that
students are mature and respon-
sible and that they are not com-
plete without making decisions in
the affairs that concern them at
the University," she said.
"In the past year, we in Assem-
bly have taken a long look at our-
selves in revising our constitution
and in working on the statement
of authority which is not yet in
its final form."
"Assembly has taught me much
this year but it could have taught
me and others more if it had had
more authority," she said.
Miss Norton cited the National
Student Association referendum

Calls Results
Of Meetings
'Successful'
A program which enabled soph-
omores in the literary college to
meet with faculty concentration
advisors in the student's field of
interest has proved very success-
ful, Hayden K. Carruth, assistant
dean for academic counseling, said
yesterday.
Describing the turnout for the
more than 20 meetings that were
held as "extraordinarily good,"
Dean Carruth explained that the
program enabled students to learn
more about the field or fields in
which they were interested in con-
centrating. He estimated that
nearly half of the 17-1800 second
semester sophomores in the liter-
ary college attended at least one
of the meetings.
Dean Carruth said that the pro-
grams were generally arranged so
that the faculty concentration ad-
visors of the department which
was sponsoring the meeting talked
about their department part of the
time, while the remainder of each
session was devoted to a question
and answer period.
Letters were sent to all of the
second semester sophomores in the
literary college informing them of
the time and place of each de-
partment's meeting. A student was
invited to attend the meetings of
each of the departments in which
he might be interested in concen-
trating.

TWO CYCLOTRONS:
Unique Laboratory
Studies Atom Core

I

I

MARY BETH NORTON
... final remarks
last fall and the statement of au-
thority as "issues which have pro-
voked thought."
Campus Issues
"I hope that in the future this
body will continue to consider
campus issues as well as matters
pertaining to the women's resi-'
dence hall system.
"I hope, too, that Assembly will
be given some real power rather
than having only the power to
make recommendations which are
promptly ignored by the adminis-
tration," she said.

The University cyclotron labor-
atory is unique in that it has two
cyclotrons devoted exclusively to
sthe study of the structure, of the
cores, or nuclei, of the atom.
Sonotes the ORA News, put out
monthly by the Office of Research
Administration under assistant ed-
itor Robert E. Reiter.
The News points out that be-
fore the 8-inch cyclotron was
built, no machine existed of ade-
quate means for studying the nu-
clei of the heavier elements, such
as lead, gold, radium, and uran-
ium.
Ready This Year
Both cyclotrons will be ready
for operation late this year, ac-
cording to Prof. William C. Par-
kinson, laboratory director.
The "83-inch" size, by which
cyclotrons are measured, refers to
the diameter of the tips of the
poles of the huge magnet (which
weighs 310 tons in the new ma-
chine) that is essential to the cy-
clotron's operation.
The cyclotron is one of a class
of machines called "particle ac-
celerators" which physicists use
to study atomic nuclei by bom-
barding them with the accelerated
particles.
'Popcorn Ball'
The ORA News aescribes an
atom's nucleus as "something like
a popcorn ball." The "pieces of
popcorn" (representing protons
and neutrons, the particles in the
atom's core) are held together by
"caramel" (which, probably, in the
nucleus are particles called "me-
sons").
"If you wanted to take a close
look at one piece of popcorn em-
bedded in the ball, you could sim-
ply break the ball apart, which is

analogous to what a cyclotron
does by striking the nucleus with
other particles."
The particles are accelerated by
whirling them around, in a mag-
netic field that contains them.
Atom Smashing
The Deuteron, the core of a
heavy hydrogen atom, which con-
sists of one proton and one neu-
tron, is frequently used to make
up the stream of the bombarding
particles.
If iron atoms are used for the
"targets," the article explains, "a
deuteron strikes the nucleus of an
iron atom, knocks a proton out of
the nucleus, and then sticks in the
nucleus.
"The protons that have been
knocked out of the iron nuclei
pass through a system of three
30-ton steel and copper analyzing
magnets to a proton detector.
The 83-inch cyclotron was de-
signed by Parkinson, Prof. Rob-
ert S. Tickle, of the physics de-
partment and John Bardwick,
Grad.
Talk To Begi
Sanders Series
Prof. Homer A. Thompson of
Princeton University will deliver
the first Henry Arthur Sanders
Memorial lecture at 4:10 p.m. to-
day in Aud B, Angell Hall. The
late Prof. Sanders, a teacher of
paleography, had an important
role in the University's acquisition
of its collection of Egyptian papyri,
the largest outside the British
Museum.

BUSINESS CONFERENCE:
Miller Describes Executive Techniques

Man has developed eight de-
fenses for busy executives to cope
with "the glut of communications
until computers come along to
help," Dr. James G. Miller, di-
rector of the Mental Health Re-
search Institute, told a conference
of business executives recently.
Miller said executives can do
several things after reaching full
working capacity. They can omit
some new information so as to
catch up; commit an error; let
information pile up as corres-
pondence on a desk; filter out in-
formation through a priority sys-
tem; or give less precise answers
than required. They can also dele-
gate information to others, es-

cape, through dreams or a trip to
Tahiti or absorb "chunks" of in-
fornation, as in scanning a book.
"Executives should not feel
guilty because they have to resort
to these techniques," Miller told
the President's Conference for
Business and Industry. By using
the proper mix, he said, and by
recognizing the various penalties
to be paid for each one, business-
men cope with their work load.
The visitors heard eight speak-
ers during the conference. Dean
Floyd Bond of the School of Busi-
ness Administration told the group'
that preliminary results of a new

"m A.^: ' ro p+.rrnv:.S.1 "o' "....": cr."}:+,.y JJp. p{ S:fi+ . r+cWwyc;r,.1^.,rc;.'-;;:?r .:":"i:.;.;m,.;.r.}vq.;.v{;"?:,r}:"}:r.;.;;.;.,r1da .r.".}":: y{r,/{.;r,.};.".yv
Jl -0a i4.1"i:-" "."RM" ^.°.'ti;14{.q.. "..... ' r. ..1 1 J.1. " 4'". ""}} ^.".W ""."f'.4 .1 h ~ .1 ".1 .. r.....h. J......... ..1".Y 44 .1."r., .h ,,{{
} ; 4 . ".W. W' 11 "1'r V.W W:":: .f.. yy..+ . .1 f......" .11J'1WJJJJ "JrJ.1n 1'"JJ" " .J 1.. "r""
Vi{: yp, . .;.,.. 1.j.{1. "l.. .. ."..f .'J i" .1r. .v. . " a .S..u "..8 Wa.{{A -'+"iY.... a4 1 Rr.5d...S11;k:K'Y : L'.".i1 ' "~ '~.........hN".M.^.VJ.W1....11....,.1.....to...tir:J'::{'~."J:s" f" 4{Wr~... A.. F'r1. 41
S1 ^,1115" L'G'b C~ d11r~~.Jw1JA fr Ali'lwti:1.iG4 ":4:":':t+t1':L'P::'w'." 1." s".S.Ww '::Y.:Y. a'..!LIY:'~A:."~:S ..M. 11tilMS{:W:h VL'::.'AA. 1Y." ': "u +} ....

in-depth study of leading Ameri-
can businessmen showed that "an-
alytical skills and judgment" were
the characteristics most sought in
executives by these men.
Conducted by Dean Bond and
Associate Dean Dick Leabo and
Prof. Alfred Swinyard of the busi-
ness administration school, the in-
terviews of 70 chief executive of-
ficers indicated that they "are
not interested in organization men,
contrary to popular impression."
Ninety-three percent of the ex-
ecutives recommended graduate
business study for future leaders.
Prof. George Odiorne of the
business administration school,
director of the Bureau of Indus-
trial Relations, said the signifi-
cant personnel decisions of the'
future will be made among the
salaried workers, a relatively small
group which plays an enormous
part in, the success or failure of
business.
University President H a r l a n
Hatcher reported on the way in
which the University has stepped
up its work in cultural fields and
in areas of research which offer
practical benefits to society.
"Tax Criteria in This Changing
World" and "The Faculty and Re-
search" were the topics of Pro-
fessors L. Hart Wright of the Law
School and Wilbert McKeachie of
the psychology department, re-
spectively.
The conference was attended by
about 40 business leaders.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

..."._:".. r .s-.a .. _ ........":a 'FS v'. . a rr{".a . 9 ". .r... '.. ..a' "6 ,A... ... r:a. . +niSr "r.. ..T. . . ...rr;. s.,4a .r.. .nj ..
:........{; t. ... "',;r... ,......... . . , .,a .M. ...,,r.4s. s..... ..S'~t'a... ^er.. . . S""". - .: i ,.o:.r~r .}3. } raTY"T4":rd :";:":} 'ESS.. 'wf.... . ."f

Near Eastern Studies: 4:15 p.m., E.
Conference Em., Rackham. Prof. I. M.
Diakonoff of the Institute of the Peo-
ples of Asia, Univ. of Leningrad, now
Visiting Prof. at The Oriental Insti-
tute, The Univ. of Chicago, will speak
on "The Study of Assyriology in the1
U.S.S.R." Public Invited.,
Doctoral Examination for Marcos Ros-
enbaum, Nuclear Engineering; thesis:l
"Applications of the Wigner Repre-
sentation to the Theory' of Slow Neu-
tron Scattering," today, 315 Auto. Lab.,F
N. Campus, at 12 noon. Chairman, P.
F. Zweifel.F
General Notices,
The Summer Session Announcement1
will be available after 2:00 on Wed.,
April 3, 3510 Admin. Bldg.
Final Payment of Spring Semester
Fees is due and payable on or before
April 22, 1963.
If fees are not paid by this date:
1) A $10.00 delinquent penalty will
be charged.
2) A "Hold Credit" will be placed
against you. This means that until
payment is received and "Hold Credit",
is cancelled:
1) Grades will not be mailed.
2) Transcripts will not be furnished.
3) You may not register for future
semesters.
4) A Senior may not graduate with his
class at the close of the current semes-
ter.
3 The Dean of your school or college
will be given a list of delinquent ac-
counts.
Payments may be made in person, or
mailed to the Cashier's Office, '1015
Admin. Bldg. before 4:30 p.m., April 22.
MAIL EARLY
Mal payments postmarked after due
date, April 22, are late and subject to
penalty. Identify mail payments as tui-
tion and show student number and
name.
Phillips Prize Exam in Latin and
Greek: Open to Freshmen and Sopho-
mores. Thurs., April 18 from 7-9 p.m.
in Mm. 25 Angell Hall. Competitors
must sign up not later than Tues.,

April 16, in the Departmental Office,
Rm. 2026 AH.
Events
Lectures in Applied Mathematics:
Prof. T. Kato of the Univ. of Califor-
nia, Berkeley, will speak at the regular
Applied Mathematics Seminar on Thurs.,
April 4, at 4:00 p.m. in Rm. 246 W.
Engrg. He will speak on the "Principle
of Invariance of Wave Operators."
Dr. O. Byelotzerkovsky of the Com-
puting Center, Academy of Science, Mos-
cow, will also speak on Thurs., April 4,
at 2:30 p.m. in Rm. 311 W. Engrg. His
topic will be "Numerical Methods in
Gas Dynamics."
Refreshments will be in Rm. 350 W.
Engrg. from 3:30 to 4:00 p.m, between
the two lectures.
Doctoral Examination for Joseph E.

Mata, Engineering Mechanics; thesis:
"Some Flow Problems in a Porous Me-
dium," Thurs., April 4, 243 W. Engin.
Bldg., at 3:00 p.m. Chairman, C. S. Yih.
The Linguistics Club of the Univ. of
Mich. invites faculty members and stu-
dents, to its meeting on Thurs., April
4, at 8:00 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre. Allan R. Keiler, instructor in'
Classical Studies, will speak on "Tax-
onomy, Transformation and the Ru-
manian Noun."
Placement
Overseas Teaching Opportunities:
Teachers College, Columbia Univ. is re-
cruiting secondary school teachers of
physics, chemistry, biology, mathemat-
ics, English, history and geography for
(Continued on Page 5)

TODAY YDIAL
ONLY 8-6416
2ND IN THE RED SEAL CLASSIC SERIES
"A MAJOR EVENT OF TH
D ANCE SE ASON ... A MUST F
JOIN MARTIN, NEW YORK TIMES
S r'f: A RANK ORGANIZATION PRESENTAT"O
- Filmed in London in EASTMAN COLOR

featuring
"Giselle"
starring
GALINA

in two acts
ULANOVA

Exactly as presented befo e
Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth;It
at the Royal Opera House,
Covent Garden

I '

U

Dial ' ENDS FRIDAY *
2-6264 Shows at 1-3-5
7and 9:08
*t *
- Filmed A s
"tX'~ %° he famed
Mdtienan
In PANA V/SIONS
R-SATURDAY *
A DARING GAMBLE FOR A PRIZE GREATER THAN VICTORY!
WALT DISNEY
% PRESENTS

4.

COMING SOON
"THE LONGEST

DAY"

FY.":"r: sv.:..:-:::::".. .. a..., ,r,";i"."".".%":}'{tiffl.. ..C:.
" :J "'::":: : """L "'"'"' %"" .:.1... "ti..: ti"::: '. StitJ S1':":.5..:.:.a tlt t:
' . f " " r ! . .. " f f .nom " s f ti'w

Y:'.
1 .y
n }
J.
iy1
f: .
i i
JI{
ItiV
;tit
f
ti
y+"+i

LAST

INTERVIEWS
for
ATION LEADERS

ORIENT

( 1 1g46l 8746 P.r

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan