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April 02, 1963 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY U,

Benedict Eyes Successful Year

BUTTS-BRYANT CASE:
Attorney General Works
On Report in Alleged Fix

By BILL BULLARD
Moby Benedict, in his first sea-
son as Wolverine baseball coach,
has been put in a situation where,
great things are expected of his
team.
This is only natural. Former
Coach Don Lund bowed out after
winning the NCAA and interna-
tional baseball championships and
left Benedict with most of the
team intact. Only one starter,
catcher Joe Merullo, and one
front-line pitcher, John Kerr, do
not return from last season's team.
This situation increases the nor-
mal pressure that any coach feels
in his first year on the job.
"When your team was the best in
the country last season, the pres-
sure is naturally on you," com-
ments Benedict. "But I'd rather
be in this 1position than inherit a
team that is on the bottom and
has to be built up.

tion of winning teams and cham-
pionships. He is only the third.
Michigan coach since 1921. The
previous two were Ray Fisher un-
der whom Benedict played and
Lund.
Fisher had Big Ten champion-
ship teams in 15 of the 38 years
of his career and coached Michi-
gan's. first NCAA championship
team. Lund, of course, developed
a Big Ten title team besides his
NCAA and international cham-
pionship team of last season.
Was Captain
Lund was captain of the 1945
Michigan squad and Benedict was
captain of the Wolverines in 1956.
"When I graduated from college
I wanted to become a professional
ballplayer," Benedict relates. "Don
was the scout that signed me for
the Detroit Tigers. I played in the
Tiger organization for three years.
"Then when Don came to Mich-
igan as head coach and I had an
opportunity to become his assist-
ant, I jumped at the chance."
After four seasons at Michigan,
Lund decided to rejoin the Detroit
Tigers as director of minor league
operations and scouting. The log-
ical choice to replace Lund was

Benedict whom Lund had recom-
mended as his successor.
One important phase of college
athletics-recruiting-should still
prosper now that Benedict has
replaced Lund. Almost half of the
present roster comes from the De-
troit area. It was the extensive
contacts of Lund and Benedict,
both native Detroiters, that en-
abled Michigan to persuade the
best players from Detroit to come
to Ann Arbor.
Born in Detroit
"Don was born in Detroit and
went to Southwestern High School
there," Benedict said. "I went to
school at Southwestern also. Don
and I both know Detroit very well.
"Don and I recruited the devil
out of Detroit in the last few
years. I know most of the coaches
and people connected with sports
in Detroit and we should continue
to get good players out of Detroit
in future years."
Benedict h a s definite ideas
about how to bring out the best
in his ballplayers. "My philosophy
is this," he commented. "I think
you've got to get out there and
demonstrate to the players what
you want them to do. If you're
teaching them to slide, then you've

got to show them by your exam-
ple how to slide.
"The players want to see proof
that what you say to do is the
right thing. I won't ask the kids
to do anything I won't do. If you
reach the age in coaching when
you can't go out and show the
players what to do, then you
ought to have an assistant coach
who can."

7 SlOULDE
/7 *4j
_% W410

MOBY BENEDICT
. . big things expected

ED BARTSCH
... backstioke champ

JEFF MOORE ED BOOTHMAN'
... third in 'fly . .. second and fifth

Stager Beams After Nationals,
But Predicts Better '64 Squad

. --

By BOB ZWINCK
The swimming giants, Southern
California and Yale, fulfilled near-
ly everyone's expectations in bat-
tling it out for the NQAA title,
but Coach Gus Stager's Wolverines
pulled out a third place finish to
surprise many an observer..
That Hoosier giant wasn't
around because of the recruiting
beanstalk which toppled a couple
years ago, so that made life a
little more pleasant for the rest
of the swimming world.
While -USC and Yale were en-
gaged in one see-saw battle, a
trio of Big Ten teams were locked.
in another. Southern Cal came
out on top with 81% points with
Yale runner-up at 77. '
But the number three slot was
available to defending champion
OSU, which lost only a few swim-
mers, Minnesota, with the phe-
nomenal pair of freestyler Steve
Jackman and butterflyer Wally
Richardson, each capable of two
firsts in their specialties plus a
first in the medley relay; and
Michigan, possessor of Ed Bartsch
in the backstroke, Dick Nelson in
the breaststroke, and high hopes.
Back in Third
The Wolverines were almost left
on the starting blocks in the first
day's events. With USC and Yale
already well out in front, Min-
nesota grabbed third with 21
points while Ohio State and Mich-
igan were tied for fourth with 12
points each.
To be sure, Michigan did have
some excellent performances. No
one yet has ever swum a faster
race every time out; but when a
team does not have a half dozen
stars, it takes many strong per-
formances by everyone to get very
far.
Roy Burry knocked some five
seconds off his previous best for
a 5:04.7 clocking in the 500-yd.
freestyle, but this was only good
for sixth. John Dumont swam
almost six seconds faster than
he had ever done-but seventh
place doesn't earn any points,
even if it is 5:08.3. Tom Dudley
would have earned eighth place
points, if there were any, with his
5:09,f.

Diver Pete Cox surprised OSU's
Juan Botella in the one-meter
event to take a second behind Lou
Vitucci. Ed Boothman plucked a
fifth here for the Blue team. The
medley relay team then added a
fifth, yielding the 12 points for
the first day. Stager said he was
pretty disappointed with the
squad's showing up to that point.
"It looked like Minnesota was
gone and now we had to battle
Ohio."
But-things began to look a little
brighter during the second day.
Ed Bartsch splashed through a
sparkling 1:57.8 to win the 200-yd.
backstroke--that's good for seven
points. Jeff Moore and Geza Bo-
dolay contributed third place
finishes in the 200-yd. butterfly
and breaststroke, respectively.
An Assist
Moore did a creditable -2:00.2,
but he got an assist from Wally
Richardson, who took an illegal
stroke. Richardson, at the end of
150 yds., thought the race was
over and turned to look at how
the others in his heat were com-
ing in. Suddenly it dawned upon
him that his race wasn't over,
but he was disqualified at this
point since he took a freestyle
stroke in getting back into position
for the last two laps.
Michigan picked up 15 points
Students!!
,A Smart Vacation
Hair Cut is Waiting
You at EITHER
U-MmBARBERS
on North University
or
The DASCOLA
BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre
"You're welcome" says
Domenic Dascola
Class of 1936

to vault past Minnesota over-all,
but Ohio State slipped into fourth
with 24.
Disappointment
On the final day Ed Bartsch
got only a disappointing fourth
in the 100-yd. backstroke. "I
thought I had swum a good race,"
said Bartsch. "But then I saw my
time." The fact is that his time
was :54.4. And :54.6 was good
enough to win the Big Tens early
in March.
Dick Nelson followed up with a
tie for first in his favorite 100-yd.
breaststroke in 1:02.7. Nelson, a
senior, was defending NCAA
champ. Burry and Dudley added
a second and third, respectively,
in the 1,650-yd. freestyle. Booth-
man and Cox gathered in the final
points with a second and fifth in
the three-meter diving.
Thus the Wolverine tankers col-
lected 52 points, just eight ahead
of Minnesota and 14 in front of
Ohio State.
Stager was proud of the result.
"Sure, I wish we had won, but we
don't have a great team-just a
good one. But we're improving."
Maybe next year will be better.
A strong freshman team coming
up will include much-needed
sprinters and also good men in
the distance freestyle, I-M, diving,
butterfly, back and breast strokes.
In short, everything is coming up
roses-if they bloom.

This brought up the fact that
Benedict will not have an assist-
ant coach this season. "I will def-
initely have an assistant next sea-
son," Benedict said. "Im taking
applications right now for the job.
We want to have plenty of time
to make a decision."
Coaching Frosh
Ed Hood, last season's captain,
is coaching the freshman team so
that part of the assistant coaches'
responsibility is taken care of.
Benedict believes that a coach
should put emphasis on all aspects
of the game. "I like to consider
myself a staunch fundamentalist,"
he said. "I don't take it for grant-
ed that my players know how to
execute a double play, or catch or
throw the ball, or slide. I assume
that ~hey don't know these things
and team them from the begin-
ning."
Hitting is important, Benedict
says, but pitching and defense also
should not be overlooked. Bene-
dict pointed to the Chicago White
Sox who have maintained a suc-
cessful record by holding down
their opponents' scoring. Although
the New York Yankees are known
for their power, their defense is
equally as tough, Benedict noted.
"Day in and day out I think
you'll find that your pitching and
defense remain constant," Bene-
dict said. "Hitting varies." .
JF K Gets Nod
Opening Day.
WASHINGTON (AP)-The White
House said yesterday President
John F. Kennedy plans to attend
the opening game of the baseball
season here next Monday.
The Washington Senators will
meet the Baltimore Orioles in the
opening game.
The P r e si d e n t traditionally
pitches out one or more baseballs
ithe opening game ceremonies.
HON DA

ATLANTA uP)-Georgia's attor-
ney general worked last last night
preparing a report on a state in-
vestigation into Saturday Eve-
ning Post allegations that last
fall's Georgia-Alabama football
game was rigged.
A summary of findings in the
Georgia probe will be made public
today by Gov. Carl E. Sanders,
who ordered the investigation
more than two weeks ago.
In Montgomery, five Alabama
players testified behind closed
doors in a legislative committee
investigation of the Post story.
The committee said in a state-
ment that Georgia coach Johnny
Griffith had been invited to ap-
pear but declined.
Sanders ordered Atty. Gen. Eu-
gene Cook to investigate after the
Post said in its March 23 edition
that Wally Butts, former athletic
director at Georgia, gave team
football secrets to Coach Paul
Bear Bryant of Alabama before
the game which Alabama won
35-0.
Bryant and Butts have denied
the collusion charges and Butts
has filed a $10 million libel suit
against the Post publishers.
An aide to the Georgia governor
conferred with Cook yesterday and
was advised that only the sum-{
Marls Pulls
Leg Muscle
LAKELAND, Fla. (P)-The New
York Yankee injury woes reached
a new high yesterday when Roger
Maris pulled up lame making a
diving catch of a line drive in an
exhibition game with the Detroit
Tigers.
The injury, diagnosed as a pull-
ed hamstring muscle in his left
leg, will sideline the Yankee right
fielder at least through the re-
mainder of the spring' exhibition
schedule.
Yankee Manager Ralph Houk,
already greatly concerned by
spring injuries and ailments suf-
fered by Whitey Ford, Mickey
Mantle, Tony Kubek, Tommy
Tresh and Clete Boyer, declared
he doubted whether Mans would
be able to play in the Yankees'
season opener at Kansas City a
week from today.
Maris' injury occurred in the
bottom of the fourth inning. The
Tigers had runners on first and
second with one out when second
baseman Dick McAuliffe drove a
liner to right center field.
Maris made a spectacular diving
backhanded catch, landing heav-
ily on the turf, rolled over, arose
in obvious pain, and limped off
the field.

mary would be completed prior to
an afternoon news conference.
The complete report of Cook's
investigation, with testimony of
numerous witnesses and exhibits
is several hundred pages long and
will not be finished until later this
week.
Sources close to Sanders pre-
dicted he would distribute copies
of the summary to newsmen and
probably issue a brief written.
statement of his own.
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