100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAOU

L ca %A LI

y

aanadian Cabinet Divides

EDUCATION BILL:
Celebrezze Defends Proposals

Looking
for

D iefenbaker

WEAPONS IN CUBA ?-
Secretary Says Missile's.
NDo Not Threaten U.S.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara
says five kinds of missiles "undoubtedly are stocked in Cuba" although
none imperils the United States.
But McNamara said "I would rather not comment" on the con-
tinued presence of Russian troops in Cuba, officially reported to
number up to 17,000, or on reported military construction activity
there. The secretary's remarks were not in reply to statements over

(.

ROBERT S. MCNAMARA
.. -no comment

Conservatives
Form Group
In Michigan
By The Associated Press
LANSING - The Conservative
Federation of Michigan was
founded recently in what might
be considered a fitting fashion.
The 150 delegates carried delib-
eration to the point that a second
meeting will be needed within 90
days to conclude the business of
beginning.
Launch Group
The first meeting of the organi-
zation, launched last September by
small businessman Charles Har-
mon of Cassopolis, saw delegates
or elect offiers Cne
nable to ratify a proposed set of
quently, the Job of incorporating
will be delayed and by the time it
is accomplished the group may
even be operating under a new
name.
The name chosen by Harmon,,
the Conservative Federation of
Michigan, was one of the major
points of debate among the dele-
gates. Objectors said it might 7ot
be nonpartisan enough to insure
the non-profit group a tax exempt
status.
sThe election job was complicat-
ed, delegates said, by 'the fact
Harmon withdrew himself from
consideration for the presidency
which he has been holding on an
interim basis. Harmon said he will
continue to serve until a' president
is elected, but said he could not
take the job because of the press
of his own business affairs.
No Debate
'Oakley R. Bramble, the federa-
,tion's executive secretary from
Lansing, said Saturday's slow start
indicated "we overestimated the
possibilities. We thought there
would not be any great debate
over the bylaws."
Bramble said the federation
picked up 67 new dues paying
members Saturday, boosting total
membership to over 600. By the
end of the year, he said, the fed-
eration hopes to have 20,000 mem-
bers.
Says Nassau Plan
Vital for Europe.
THE HAGUE (R) - Dirk Stik-
ker, secretary-general of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization, said
yesterday the Nassau proposal for
a multilateral nuclear force in
NATO is of great importance to
Europe's defense. The proposal is
proof of Britain's changed atti-
tude toward the continent, he
said.

the weekend by members of Con-
gress about the Soviet military
strength in Cuba.
1,000 Per Cent
In the growing new controversy
over the extent and gravity of the
Russian arms buildup, Sen. Ken-
neth B. Keating (R-NY), said in
a television interview Sunday
night that Soviet troops in Cuba
now number about ten times as
many as were estimated by offi-
ciajs to be there last July.
iep. Donald C. Bruce (R-Ind)
followed this up yesterday with a
House speech saying he has in-
formation from friendly diplomats
indicating that 40 or more Soviet
intermediate-range missiles-cap-
able of striking at the heart of
the United States - still are in
Cuba.
These, he said, are in addition to
the 40 or 42 originally reported
and removed at United States in-
sistence.
Dispute
The Defense Department quick-
ly disputed Bruce's statement, de-
claring
"No friendly government has
so informed the United States.
There remains no credible evi-
dence that there are offensive So-
viet weapons in Cuba.
"If Bruce has credible evidence
to support his statement, the de-
partment of defense would like to
receive it."
McNamara said "Reports per-
haps confuse ground-to-ground,
intermediate-range ballistic mis-
siles with the other types of mis-
siles."
Resume Talks
In NY. Strike
NEW YORK (AP) - Peace talks
were resumed today in New York's
59-day newspaper blackout, amid
rumors that the publishers were
giving ground.
The reports promptly were de-
nied. "The report of a new offer
by the publishers 'to New York
Typographical Local Six is in-
correct," said the Publishers As-
sociation of New York.

DOUGLAS HARKNESS
. . . quits post
FILIBUSTER
Southerners
Stop Senate
Rule Change
WASHINGTON (P) -- Southern
Senators resumed their lengthy
speeches yesterday when the Sen-
ate began its fourth week of de-
bate on changes in its anti-fili-
buster rule.
Sens. John Stennis (D-Miss)
and Strom Thurmond (D-SC)
held the floor for extended periods
while 'the south rn bloc continued
to prevent a vote even on the
question of bringing up a rules
change.
The motion under debate is to
bring before the Senate a proposal
of Sen. Clinton P. Anderson (D-
NM), to amend the rules so that
a filibuster could be ended by votes
of three-fifths of the Senators
present. It now takes two-thirds.
Even if this motion were adopt-
ed, the Southerners then could re-
sume their marathon talking on
the* merits of the change itself.
Some Senators advocating a
rules change reportedly are in fa-
vor of trying to wear out the
Southerners.
However, the Senate parliamen-
tarian reported that 15 of the
Southerners still have one spe Bch
remaining
There also was talk of ending
the impasse by a motion to send
the whole matter to committee,
by a motion to table and thus kill
the pending question, or by an at-
tempt to invoke cloture and thus
limit debate under the present
two-thirds rule.

Split Comes
WithDispute'
On Weapons
Defense Minister
Gives Resignation
OTTAWA WP)-Canada's nuclear
weapons dispute with the United
States split Canadian Prime Min-
ister John Diefenbaker's cabinet
yesterday and brought an opposi-
tion demand for new elections as
Defense Minister Douglas Hark-
ness resigned.
But Diefenbaker appeared to
have the votes to weather for now
the biggest storm he has encount-
ered in Parliament.
Harkness quit, denouncing Dief-
enbaker's wait-and-see . nuclear
policy, and 4predicted the Consr-
vative government' could not win
re-election unless it agrees to ac-
cept United States nuclear war-
heads.
No Confidence
Opposition Liberal Party leader
Lester B. Pearson then introduced
in Parliament a motion of no
confidence in Diefenbaker's gov-
ernment in an effort to force new
elections.
Pearson's motion assailed the
government for "lack of lead-
ership, the breakdown of unity
within the cabinet, confusion and
indecision in handling national
and international affairs"
Minority Power
A vote on the no confidence mo-
tion is expected tonight, and the
opposition parties, if they get to-
gether, have the votes to bring
down Diefenbaker's minority gov-
ernment and force new elections in
the spring.
But Social Credit Party leader
Robert Thompson said his party
will support the Diefenbaker re-
gime against the Liberal attempt
to bring down his government.
The Social Credit Party's 30
votes are all the Conservatives
need to beat down the Liberal
motion.
Later, however, Thompson said
his declaration of support for
Diefenbaker was intended as stal-
ling until the Social Credit depu-
ties could caucus.
He indicated that the Social
Credit Party will have a no con-
fidence motion of its own. How-
ever, it was noted that the Social'
and Liberal Parties several times
before had each introduced no
confidence motions but that nei-
ther voted for the other, thereby
killing them.,

WASHINGTON OP)( - President
John F. Kennedy's sweeping aid-
to-education bill was launched,
yesterday on a stormy Congres-
sional voyage.
Some Democrats saw little
chance the entire measure will
pass while a Republican protested
that an omibus approach could
kill the whole thing.
But Secretary of Welfare An-
thony J. Celebrezze insisted the
program should be viewed as a
whole. He said of the Administra-
tion's 24-part bill:
"Each part depends upon the
others. They're all important and
you can't segment it. We've been
delaying for 15 years and it's
critical."
Unseaworthy
Looming ahead are the same
shoals on which the aid program
foundered last year-controversy
over aid to private schools and the
shape of assistance programs for
higher education.
Celebrezze told the House Edu-
cation'and Labor Committee the
entire Administration program is
needed "to meet selected and ur-
gent needs of American educa-
tion."
He refused to choose any priority
points in the education bill, even
after Rep. Edith Green (D-Ore)
told him "there is little chance of
the entire bill going through."'
Objections
The omnibus approach brought
a vigorous protest from Rep. Peter
Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) who said.
"The last college-aid bill was
killed because it was mixed in
with student assistance. The sweet
and the sour were lumped to-
gether and were indigestible.
"Your insistence on a cradle-to-

gress to decide now how to handle
the measure. He said the Admin-I
istration had done it's job by pre-
senting the proposal in the omni-
bus form it considers best.
The committee chairman, Rep.
Adam C. Powell (D-NY) said it
the bill goes to the House floor
as it stands now, it will be emas-
culated. He endorsed the omnibus
approach, but said the education
program might be handled "in
two or three other omnibus bills."
If an education bill isn't passed
this year, Powell said, "education
for our generation as far as fed-
eral assistance is concerned is
finished."

Erhard Leads Opposition
To German-French Pact
BONN .(P)-West German Vice Chancellor Ludwig Erhard said.
yesterday he would back Atlantic unity even if it meant opposing
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, and declared he was ready to take over
as chancellor if backed by Parliament.
The challenge - the strongest bid Erhard has made for the
chancellorship - came amid signs that an anti-Adenauer group was
emerging over resentment of the German-French cooperation pact,
sparked by France's rejection of o
Britain's bid to enter the Common
Market.
Market.Romney. Sets
But a government spokesman
said no serious opposition -had
dared show itself at a meeting New Officials
Adenauer called with 30 Parlia-
mentary deputies to press for rati-
fication of the treaty he signedFor Agencies
with French President Charles de
Gaulle. By The Associated Press

Celebrezze said the Adminis-
tration is opposed to a proposal
that the government offer tax
credits to people paying tuition to
send their children to private
schools.
For one thing, he said, "our
basic analysis is that it doesn't
help the lower economic group."
Frelinghuysen asked why the bill
doesn't contain college scholar-
ship provisions, as did the measure
proposed two years ago.
Celebrezze said a "broader stu-
dent loan program" would replace
the scholarship proposal -for now,
and urged a thorough study of
scholarships.

Pileck up
(not a "pick-up" for
any man who foolishly
started to read this!)
A pick up is some-
thing for post exam
time, for girls, and for
the seemingly longest
Winter memorable:

I

I

It's

a

Sl

grave education bill is3
the patient."
Celebrezze said it's

going to kill
up to Con-

Registrar Says
Negro Lacks
Qualifications
HATTIESBURG, Miss. (M' -
Dewey. Greene Jr.'s scholastic
shortcomings came out yesterday
as the reason the University of
Mississippi rejected the 22-year-
old Negro's application.
Greene and the university's reg-
istrar, Robert Ellis, testified in a
hearing before United States Dis-
trict Judge Sidney M i z e on
Greene's suit seeking a court order
directing the university to accept
him as a student.
Ellis testified the university
turns down as many as 100 ap-
plications a year for the same rea-
son it rejected Greene - an in-
adequate scholastic record.
In addition to this, Ellis said,
Greene was trying to transfer
from a school lacking accredita-
tion, Mississippi Vocational School
for Negroes.

Separate Conferences
Before the meeting, Erhard,
Foreign Minister Gerhard
Schroeder and Christian Demo-
cratic Party Manager Josef-Her-
mann Dufhues conferred separ-
ately, leading to speculation of
anti-Adenauer maneuvering.
Erhard told the Sueddeutsche
Zeitung, one of Germany's most
respected dailies, that, if neces-
sary to preserve Atlantic unity, he
would be ready to join in a coali-
tion with the opposition Social
Democrats.
There was no immediate reac-
tion from Adenauer, who has said
he would retire next fall at the age
of 87.
Asked by the newspaper wheth-
er he would hold the line for unity
with the West and "against spe-
cial little European alliances" even
if it meant deepening the cleavage
between himself and Adenauer,
Erhard was quoted as replying:
"I am convinced that a respon-
sible politician cannot pursue any
other policy."
The Christian Democrats are
believed to favor Erhard as Aden-
auer's successor but the chancel-
lor would prefer someone else.
Putsch
Asked if he were ready to take
over, Erhard replied:
"Yes. ..if my party and Par-
liament so decide.
Despite resentment against the
French-German pact for coopera-
tion in foreign relations, educa-
tion and defense, no prominent
West German politician, including
Erhard, has openly opisosed the
treaty.
Parliament is not expected to
act on ratifying it before May or
June.

LANSING-Several major ad-
ministrative shuffles have result-
ed from the incumbancy of the
Romney administration.
Gov. George W. Romney fired,
James N. Inglis as chairman of the
Public Service -Commission and
moved up member Thomas M.
Burns as chairman and added De-
troit accountant George Washing-
ton to replace Inglis.
Charles F. Wagg stepped down
as state mental health director
declaring he wanted to head up
an improved and expanded re-
search division within the mental
health department. m
Romney recommended that a
nationally-known psychiatrist be
recruited to replace Wagg, a lay-
man, but warned that it would
cost money.

I

I

a

You can
pick up
ski pants
and
parkas

at

I

a

20% OFF
(ski sweaters on sale
tool)

I

and
dresses
$5 $8 $10

I

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
'Ball Asks Ban on Foreign Contributions

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Enactment of
a law prohibiting foreign govern-
ments and interests from contrib-
uting to American political candi-
dates was recommended yesterday
by Undersecretary of State George
W. Ball. Ball made,'the suggestion
at the opening of a Senate investi-
gation into the extent of influ-
ence exerted on United States poli-
cies by agents in the pay of fot-
eign powers.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
privileges and election subcommit-,
tee dismissed yesterday a com-
plaint contesting the reelection of
Sen. Lister Hill (D-Ala) last No-
vember. The complaint was filed
by James D. Martin of Gadsden,.
Ala, Hill's Republican opponent
in the closest senatorial election
in Alabama since Reconstruction
days.
WASHINGTON - Rep. F. Ed-
ward Hebert (D-La) said yester-
day he fears Congress has given
the secretary of defense too much
power to override the generals and
admirals and may have to take
back some of this authority.
CAMBRIDGE-Mississippl Gov.
Ross Barnett, shunted to another
auditorium by groups opposing his
militant' segregation stand, said

last night theie is a "crying need"
for the states to preserve theiri]sov-
ereignty. "Not only the Southernl
states, but all of the states of the
union must be and are conscious
of the present peril to state sov-
ereignty," Barnett said in a speech
at Harvard University. ,
* *
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy reported to Congress
yesterday that important advances
have been made toward creating
a'global commercial communica-
tions satellite system and that 1963
"should be a year of significant
progress."
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Appropriation: Committee is go-
ing to give '"appropriate attention"
to United States participation in
the financing of United Nations
op{-rations in the Congo. This was
disclosed yesterday when Sen.
John G. Tower (R-Tex) made pub--
lie a letter from Chairman Carl
Hayden (D-Ariz) of the appropria-
tions group.
WASHINGTON-The Air Force
announced yesterday it halted re-
search and development work on
the Skybolt missile last Thursday.
i

Production of the bomber-launch-
ed missile ended Dec. 31 after the
United States decided to cancel
the project.
* * *
LONDON-The Macmillan gov-
ernment easily turned back a La-
bor Party no-confidence motion
last night and went ahead with a
massive program of capital expen-
diture to provide more jobs in the
hard-hit Northeast, where unem-
ployment is rising. The vote was
317-236 in the House of Commons.
* * *
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy will' address a sym-
posium on economic growth here
Feb. 25. The address will provide
a chance for a new public discus-
sion of his tax revision program.
* * *
JUNEAU-Republicans won con-
trol of Alaska's House of Repre-
sentatives by secret ballot yester-
day after a week of wrangling.
The 20 Republicans and 20 Demo-
crats had been deadlocked over
House organization since the legis-
lative session opened Jan. 28.
CAPE CANAVERAL--Astronaut
Leroy Gordon Cooper's projected
orbital flight has been delayed
,it

LEVI'S
ALL COLORS
oddk
1209 S. Unjv.
Ann Arbor
NO 5-9426 '

I

L,

and
skirts
sweaters
blouses
slacks
(all wonderful sale
pickups!)}

(that's cheap!)

I

I

MMMMA

E

CLEARANC

and
Lanz

(yup they're on
sale too!)

I

and
bathing
suits!

- U

STUDENT
STU2DE &TS
C AN AF'O1RD?

83 ITMERARIES
featuring:
Western & Central Europe
Eastern Europe & USSR
Scandinavia - Spain
Turkey * South America
Israel - Greece
36-60 land days .,. from $510
also
INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP
DRIVE-YOURSELF TOURS
and

I

WUILLIAM

A.

LEWIS

STUDY-TRAVEL
PROGRAMS
some scholarship
assistance available
Also Work Camp

I I
P a~t ti

(everybody would think
you're crazy if you
wear it in A.A. now?
But just buying one
and putting it away is
a pick up in itself and
think of the money you

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan