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February 05, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-05

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TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. I

Hatcher Lands Fraternity Rise

Kertesz Stresses Solid Beat'
In Playing Modern Works

By CARL COHEN
"I have always sponsored fra-
ternities as an important and sig-
nigicant part of the life and tra-
dition of the University; however
there is no reason why their at-
tractiveness should not be greater
in the future," University Presi-
dent Harlan Hatcher said to the
Fraternity Officers Conference
Friday.
President Hatcher noted the
"strong steady growth" of the
system since 1913, when there were
27 fraternities with 676 members,
until today, when there are 43
social fraternities with 2,800 men
in them.
He noted the problems of earlier
periods; "irresponsible rowdyism,"
seperation of fraternities from the
main stream of college life," and
"Hell Week, when many students
were seriously injured or even
killed. There are no longer mat-
ters of deep concern," he said.
Notes Characteristics
"I give enthusiastic endorse-
ment to the kind of men the fra-
ternities help to produce," Presi-
dent Hatcher said. He noted such

characteristics as selectivity, con-
geniality, discipline, loyalty, Uni-
versity citizenship, and interest in
important activities as laudable
traits encouraged by fraternities.
"There is no 'fraternity crisis'
today, however we must take 'fore-
ward steps'," he noted.
"I would like to get rid of the
'impregnable quadrilateral'-booze,
women, athletics and bias.
The president made four specific
suggestions to the fraternity of-
ficers. "Get out of the bias con-
troversy, the day and age for this
kind of thing have passed. Organ-
izations have the right to make
selections, but they should not be
dictated to by outside groups."
Extend Houses
"There should be a careful plan
to improve and extend houses. I
am greatly concerned that we have
Steam Rate
Sets Record
The Plant Department let out
more steam during intersession
than in any other week in its his-
tory.
A department official reported
that at the high point last week
the production of steam reached
477 thousand pounds per hour.
The designed capacity of the de-
partment's equipment is 525 thou-
sand pounds per hour.
No equipment broke down and
no complaints have been received
so we assume everybody was ade-
quately taken care of, the official
said.

not moved forward vigorously in
remodeling and extending frater-
nity facilities," he commented,
stating that the University has set
aside property on North Campus
for fraternity houses. "The ad-
ministration has no set policy in
this matter, and is willing to work
with the fraternities in any man-
ner they wish.
"There should be a better study
atmosphere." Specifically he sug-
gested libraries in the houses, and
making the chapter rooms places
for study and meditation.
Finally, he advocated "more con-
sideration to incorperating a house
mother into future plans to help
make the necessary social adjust-
ment easier," and also to making
use of the "enormous resources of
faculty personnel available" for a
great "intellectual thrust."
President Hatcher concluded
that there is a great opportunity
for continued "orderly develop-
ment.'
"Ask yourself where you are
today, and where you can move
tomorrow to make the system even
greater," he said.

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
"When conducting m o d e r n'
works the orchestral conductor
must show a strong, solid beat to
make the players feel more se-
cure," Istvan Kertesz, tour con-
ductor of the NDR Symphony Or-
chestra of Hamburg, said recently.
"It is not necessary for such a
strong beat to be given when con-
ducting the classical repertoire.
I do not mean to imply, however,
that a good baton technique is
unnecessary for the classics. In
fact, the exact same gestures are
used for both. The conductor must
take these gestures and shape
them to the piece, rather than try
to fit the piece to the gestures."
Classical Composers
Bartok and Hindemith now be-
long to the list of classical com-
posers, explained Kertesz. It is the
twelve-tone c o m p o s e r s like
Schoenberg and the electronic
composers like Stockhausen who
are considered avant garde.
"I personally don't like electron-

ic music because it is too hard,
too intellectual, and too difficult
to listen to. I predict that twelve-
tone composition will continue,
but electronic music is just a
passing fad and will die," Kertesz
commented.
Unpopular in Europe
"It is interesting to note that
American compositions are not
very popular in Europe. Those of
Copland, Foss and Carter, for in-
cert there. I cannot account for
stance, are rarely heard in con-
this unfortunate void in the Euro-
pean taste," Kertesz mused.
Kertesz, whose favorite compos-
ers are Mozart and Brahms, Will
tour Israel in April, and Argen-
tina in June.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congregational Disciples E & R Stud.
Guild, Cost Luncheon Discussion, Feb.
5, Noon, 802 Monroe.
* * *
Culture Club, Organizational Meet-
ing, Feb. 7. 7:15 p.m., Union.
* * *
Mich. Forensic Guild, OrganizationAl
Meeting for persons interested in de-
bate and other forensic activities, Feb.
5, 7:30 p.m., 2040 FB.
* * *
Voice Political Party, Forum on
American Society, Feb. 5, 8 p.m., Un-
dergrad Lib., Multi-purpose Rm. Speak-
er: Dr. W. Livant, Mental Health Re-
search Institute.
* * *
Uir Ski Club, Meeting, Aspen Trip
Plans, Movie, Feb. 5, 7:30 p.m., Union.
* * *
Chess Club, Meeting, Free Lessons--
beginners taught, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m.R
Union, Rms. 3K-L, Everyone Welcome.

T H E UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents

U

I

gross receipts fell slightly. Cohen+
cited the following reasons for Set Deadline
the exchange's success.
SBX sold those books which For Petitions
were never sold and never re-
claimed by their owners during
the special week set aside for The deadline for turning in peti-
picking up unsold texts. tions for Student Government
It collected books prior to its Council's Committee on Member-
sales period on the diag and in ship in Student Organizations is
the women's dormitories, and 5 p.m. Thursday at 1546 SAB.
placed information on SBX in Petitions may be picked up at
dormitory mailboxes, any time in Council's offices in
The exchange will offer students the SAB.
a 30 per cent advance payment The Committee on Membership
on the books they put up for sale, is empowered by SGC to investi-
if they want it. gate;possible discrimination in stu-
"Fighting all the problems con- dent organizations, including the
nected with SBX is like trying to fraternity-sorority system, and
swim; in, molasses," Cohen re- recommend legislation.
marked, "it's quite exhausting." Those petitioning are asked to
"This semester the exchange list their membership in other stu-
will. do at least $500 more business dents organizations. They are
than last; as more students come asked to answer under what cir-
to realize that they can save cumstances they believe the Com-
money by buying and selling, and mittee should undertake an in-
that ' BX is a non-profit service vestigation of a group, and what
organization existing for their the relationship is between the
benefit," Cohen said, "but I still Committee on Membership in Stu-
do not expect our problems to be dent Organizations and the Stu-
solved overnight." dent Government Council.
'Once Fesival To Offer
ContemnorarV Music

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents
APA
!ASSOCIATbWq " PROOUCINGATISygt

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13 -17
A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM
Fib. 240--24
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE
Feb. 27.- March 's
THE TRAGICAL HISTORY
KING RICHARD THE SECOND
Eves.: Wed.-Sat. 8:30 Matinees: Sat. 2:30 and Sun. 3:00
X C NOW OPEN

IIII!11] 3 'l 1

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group and other compositions
written in America and abroad.
The guest artists for this year's
festival, will be The Hart Chamber
Players, a visiting European com-
poser and the American composer
John Cage with pianist David
Tador.
The Hart Chamber Players, an
eight man ensemble under the
direction of Edwin . London, are
guests for the first two concerts.
All of the concerts begin at
8:30 p.m.

LEVI'S
ALL COLORS
1209 S. Universi*y
Ann Arbor
NO 5-9426

Trueblood Theatre

Mon.-Fri. 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

Sat., Feb. 9 - 8:30 P.M. - Hill Aud.
' BOX C'FFICE NO W OPEN
Daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. HILL AUDITORIUM
Orch. $3.00, $2.00; 1st Bafc. $3.00, $2.00
APA Members: 20-40% Discount
Presented in Association with U-M Dance Department

PRICES: Wed..
$3.00, $2.25,
$3.00, $2.25,

and Thurs. Eves. and Mats.: Orch. $3.50, $3.00; Batc.
$1.50. Fri. and Sat. Eves.: Orch. $3.75, $3.25; BaIc.
$1.50.

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