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March 19, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-19

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PAGE TWQ;

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 19,1963'

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. MARCH 19. 1963

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I

GLASS-BLOWING SAVES MONEY:
Myers Shapes_'U'Laboratory Apparatus

Clurman Views History
Of Theatre -in A merica

In

By MICHAEL MAAS
Every science department in the
University often depends on the
little known work of one man.
David I. Myers, the University's
glassblower, makes all the special
apparatus used in the science lab-
oratories, the hospital and many
research projects. He saves the
University up to 60 per cent on
glass equipment by making it here.
There is no lack of demand for
Myers' skills, as he turns out about
2500 jobs every year from his shop
in the Chemistry Bldg.
Special Vessel
Myers fills a request for a spe-
cial piece of apparatus by first
taking standard shaped rods,
Cites ,Causes
O0f Cold Wr
By BARBARA LAZARUS
"The cold war is complex and
is produced by many factors which
do not operate independently of
each other, Thomas Milburn, re-
search associate at Northwestern
University and director of the Be-,
havorial Sciences Group of the
United States Naval Ordnance
Test Station at China Lake, Calif.,
said yesterday.
Milburn noted that many peo-
ple tend to think there is only'
one basic factor behind the cold
war.
"Many people think of it as es-
sentially a power struggle, while
others see conflict as born from
an ideological struggle. Another
group may see it as the result of
personalities involved," he explain-
ed.
Cost vs. Gain
"Those who see the cold war as
function of a power struggle
often see it in terms of 'cost-vs.-
gain' matrices, especially since the
cold war operates on the basis of
threat."
"For example, if the United
States 'rewards' a nation with
something like a treaty, the im-
pact of 'the treaty may not be felt
right away, and therefore we may
not immediately feel the effect of
it as a reward," Milburn explain-
ed.
On the other hand, if the Unit-
ed States uses threats instead of
rewards, we may feel more rapid
"feedback" in response to them.
Threats Work Rapidly
"In crises, which usually occur
in short time-spans; the threat,
takes a shorter amount of time to
take effect on the threatener,
whereas rewarding takes a longer
one.
"One concern about employing,
reward in international relations
is that some people may consider
it appeasement even when we re-
ward a nation for non-aggressive
behavior or backing down. Another,
problem is if we're going to re-
ward Russia, there is a difficulty
in finding out what is rewarding
to them.

flasks or tubes of glass and heat-I
ing them to about 1800°C with
a bench lamp.
He then blows into the pliable
glass through another piece of
glass tubing; and with the aid of
shapers, cutters and other tools,
he is able to blow and shape the
glass into the desired form.
"No two jobs are exactly the
same, but most of the complex
pieces are made by assembling sev-
eral simple pieces," Myers said.
Delicate Art
"glassblowing is an art, just
like painting or music; anyone can
learn a little bit about it, but you
have to have an aptitude for it to
be good. You have to have patience
and be able to work with your
hands."
It takes about six months for a
person to learn the mechanics of
glassblowing well enough to be a
help rather than a hazard in the
shop. One becomes a good glass-
blovrer only with three or four
years of experience, according to
Myers.
Glassblowing requires a knowl-
edge of how different pieces of
glass equipment are used. Some
hospital equipment should be de-
void of sharp edges, and chemistry
equipment must be made to with-
stand heavy stresses and contain
chemical reactions, Myers said.
Vast Experience
Myers has 25 years of exper-
ience. He started as an apprentice
while working in the analytical lab
of the DuPont Experimental Sta-
tion near his home in Wilmington.
He came to the University in 1954.
Changes in research methods
have brought about changes in the
equipment Myers makes. "The
over-all shift has been from large
equipment to the small apparatus
now being used in micro-analysis,
chromotography and other mod-
ern research methods," he ex-
plained.
The current demand for glass
blowers is greater than the sup-
ply, Myers says. The University
has been a victim of this short-
age, at a time when the expansion
of research is putting a greater
demand on the glassblowing de-
partment.
To meet this demand, Myers
would like to see the University
expand its facilities in the glass-
blowing department, and hire or
train more glassblowers.
Speakers To Note
Role of Students
Prof. Richard Meier of the nat-
ural resources school and the Men-
tal Health Research Institute, and
Paul Potter, Grad, will speak at
7:Z0 p.m. today in the UGLI Mul-
tipurpose Rm. on "The Social Role
of the University and the Stu-
dent." This talk is the first in the
International Student Seminar se-
ries sponsored by the United States
National Student Association Com-
mittee of Student Government
Council, The Michigan Union and
the Women's League.

-Daily-Richard Cooper
'U' GLASS BLOWER-David I. Myers turns out 2500 pieces of
laboratory glassware a year for University researchers, saving
the University 60 per cent on such items.
AHE MEETING:
Group Condemns EA
For School Aid Stand

By DEBORAH BEATTIE
"No community is a truly civiliz-
ed community without a theatref
of its own because the theatre is
the privileged observation post for
society," Harold Clurman, direc-
tor, author and critic, said yester-s
day speaking on "The Scope of
the Theatre."1
Through its shows, stories and,
dancing we see the times more
clearly than through statistics, he
explained.
Broadway and the theatre are
both shrinking financially and ar-
tistically at present because they
don't conceive of their functions as
a mirror of the times, but as lim-
ited entertainment.
Appetites Grow
Clurman noted, however, that at
the same time that Broadway and
the theatre are shrinking, people's
appetite for theatre is expanding
although this is not yet obvious.
He cited the University's Pro-
fessional Theatre Program as very
heartening and praised the efforts
of Sir Tyrone Guthrie in Minne-
apolis and the Actors' Workshop
in San Francisco which he be-
lieves are manifestations of a
growing theatre with a wider view
of entertainment.
Tracing the development of the
American theatre, Clurman said
that the first truly American the-
atre is exemplified in the works
of Eugene O'Neill who brought
some of the American realism that
had sprung up in literature into
the theatre. In his' plays people
could see not only what they had
accomplished but could see the re-
sults of this, he said.
Show Failures
Writers like Frank Norris and
Theodore Dreiser had begun to
show Americans where they had
failed, but this had not immedi-
ately been reflected in the theatre
because there had to be com-
munity recognition of the problems
first, he explained.
O'Neill's plays introduced the
shallow insensitivity of the busi-
nessman driven by the need to be
successful and the driving forces
behind the labor unions, Clurman
said.
"The depression in the 1930's
proved that what O'Neill had said
was true. People had to think and
became socially conscious, and this
was reflected in the theatre of
this period," he said.

"The slight relaxation, weariness
and confusion before the war that
typified the early 1940's is exem-
plified in William Saroyan's hobo
outlook on life. Arthur Miller and
Tennessee Williams express the
social attitude of the late 1940's
with their criticism of man trying
to be something he is not and the
social unconsciousness of the need
to help minorities," he said.
How To Live?
In the 1950's, Clurman pointed
out, people began to ask more and
more how to live. Corresponding to
the new conservatism developing
in this society is "The Cocktail
Party" by T. S. Eliot, an English-
man born in St. Louis, who says
that since we are all average we
should accept our inabilities.
The theatre of the absurd has
become the expression of the
1960's typified by Edward Albee
and Samuel Becket. "Although the
bomb is not mentioned in these
plays, it has a great influence on
the depression and the bitter sa-
tires and jokes about situations in
which man is helpless," Clurman
said.
Summing up the scope of the
theatre, Clurman said that "all
plays and actors are representative
of our society. In understanding
the scope of the theatre we bring
in the scope of our own lives and
knowledge. Without this knowl-
edge we are lacking and crippled."
Tree-Spraying.
Work To Start
As soon as warm weather comes,
the University will start to spray
the elm trees along campus streets
and parking lots.
The job, which will take from
two to three weeks, must be done
when the temperature is continu-
ally above freezing, grounds fore-
man Robert Hanselmann said re-
cently.
The spraying will be done only
on windless days, and the areas
to be sprayed will be indicated one
day ahead of time. The University
is using DDT mist because it is
the best control for the bark
beetles which spread Dutch elm
disease, he added.

BA
arcade

YJs
j ewelIry

A

16 Nickels Arcade
COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND

dRam

TWO TERRIFIC
COMEDIES

By LAURA GODOFSKY
Editor, Chicago Maroon !
special to The Daily1
CHICAGO-The Association for
Higher Education condemned the
National Education Association
last week for its role in the Con-
gressional defeat of last year's aid
to higher education bill.
At the same time, the AHE
commended the NEA for joining
with other educational organiza-
tions this year to "seek agree-
ments on sound and constructive
national policies for education at
all levels."
These stands, endorsing federal
aid to education and President
John F. Kennedy's omnibus edu-
cation bill, were among resolu-
tions adopted at the National,
Conference on Education last
Wednesday.
60 Units
The conference was sponsor ed
by the AHE, which is one of some
60 autonomous departments of
the NEA.
TheNEA is a professional or-
ganization of individual teachers.
Its nearly one million members
are predominantly from elemen-
tary and secondary schools.
The 18,000 students, faculty
members, and administrators who
belong to the AHE automatically
become affiliated, members of the
NIA.
Conflicting Stands
The NEA and the AHE, how-1
ever, had conflicting stands on
federal aid to education last year.
The AHE is on record as support-
ing across-the-board aid to all
schools, while the NEA considers
grants to church-controlled col-
leges and universities unconsti-
tutional, and opposes them.
The major reason the NEA is
supporting thisyear's bill is that
the provisions for these broad,
across - the - board g r a n t s to
church - controlled colleges and
universities that were in last
year's bill have been removed, G.
Kerry Smith, executive secretary
of the AHE, explained.
Instead, the new bill has pro-
visions for aid "for specific pur-
poses in the national interest."
Omnibus Bill
And, although the NEA plans
to propose amendments to specific
parts of the omnbus bill, the bill
as a whole is so important that
the association will vigorously
support it, Smith said.
The American Council on Edu-
cation which is composed of or-
ganizations and institutions rath-
er than individuals, was among
the many other groups supporting
last year's bill.
(Shortly before the House of
Representatives' vote on the col-
lege aid bill, the NEA sent tele-
To Give Lecture
On Social Action
H. Merrill Jackson of the Mental
Health Research Institute and
Rev. Erwin A. Gaede of the First
Unitarian Church will discuss "So-
cial Action and the Church" at
a Voice Political Party forum at
7:30 tonight in Rm. 3R-S of the
Michigan Union.

We promised to let you know
They're here!
. our 1963 collection
of
pierced earrings
at

OPERATION U
starts
aa
AND *
*NOTHING BUT NOTHING ;_
Ahrh
"A KIND OF LOVING"

grams to all members of the
House warning that passage of
the proposed legislation would not
be in the best national interest.)
In addition to the omnibus edu-
cation bill, the AHE endorsed bills
to provide federal support funds
for:
Federal programs in the
sciences, such as the National
Science Foundation.
New programs for construction
of teaching facilities for health-
related professions.
New programs for promoting
interest in the arts and cultural
exchanges.
Tax structure support to en-
courage private contributions to
education and to allow income tax
deductions for costs incurred in
securing an education.
Other Action
Other resolutions passed at the
conference advocated:
Cabinet status for the commis-
sioner of education.
Greater curricular flexibility in
high schools and colleges in order
to encourage more advanced pro-
grams.
Experimentation w i t h a n d
adoption of new audio-visual
media as teaching aids.
Institutional independence from
external and internal pressures.
"A firm sense of administrative
and :faculty responsibility" to
match "the freedom to inquire
and the freedom of reasonable
self-determination.

" ""--"'

Order Your Subscription Today-
Phone No 2-3241

l
r
!.

I

Festival Presents
Student Art Show
The Creative Arts Festival, in
conjunction with the architecture
college, presents the annual stu-
dent art show on display in thel
north lounge of the Michigan
Union from 3-5 p.m. and 7:30-
10:30 p.m. today. through Friday;
1-5 p.m. and 8:30-11:30 p.m. Satur-
day; and 1-5 p.m. and 7:30-10:30
p.m. Sunday.
DIAL 2-6264
FEATURE STARTS AT
1 -3-5-7and9:20

THE MICHIGAN UNION
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
presents

.=
ICi

3 ACADEMY AWARD1
including BEST PICTURE !

Limited Engagement
Through Thursday
Two Return Hits
NOMINATIONS

n ev

"The big difference between
people! is the difference'
999 9

Better allocation of college and
university resources to meet an-
ticipated increases in enrollment.
Firm university resistence of
state governments'- attempts to
establish controls over public in-
stitutions of higher education
"when such controls threaten the
integrity of institutions or weaken
the processes of teaching or re-
search."
States Lauded
In addition, the AHE commend-
ed such states as South Carolina,
Georgia and Florida and those
public and private institutions
which h a v e calmly admitted
Negro students in the face of
opposing regional traditions.
And, finally, it deplored token
integration and "unofficial or in-
formal practices" such as "ad-
herence to bias clauses in national
fraternity and sorority charters,
which "make a mockery of offi-
cial institutional policies on race
and religion."
We of
MARILYN MARK'S
welcome you to use
the facilities of our
BEAUTY SALON

MONDAY, MARCH 25

NORMAN IR
Author of "Naked and the Dead"
"Advertisements for Myself"
and featured columnist in "Esquire" Magazine
at TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM

S.. 8 P.M.

Tickets Now On Sale At The Michigan Union Desk
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VICKIE WELLMAN
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