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March 14, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 14,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 14.

_ r _ ..._. . .

Cole Accepts Challenge,'
Asks Science Expansion,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The demonstration was a 29-
minute film of one of the lessons
which has been broadcast. It dealt
with the works of Eihily Dicken-
son and showed how literature
could be handled on the "silver
screen," as Prof. Eastman put it.
The third section of the pro-
gram, the lecture, dealt with the
effects of televised lessons on the
classroom teacher. He said that
there is a choice of roles the
teacher can play: he can use the
lessons as a supplement to his
own syllabus, in a subdued role,
or he can become a "lieutenant"
to the television lecturer, some-
what like a recitation leader at
the University.
Co-Captain
There is a third choice, the
preferred one, Prof. Eastman as--
serted. That is to assume the role
of co-captain, to agree or disagree
with the lecturer as is necessary.1
This choice allows for a second
perspective, "equal but different"'
from the lecturer, and shows the
student that truth is not a can-
ned and singular entity, but a
composite of many respectable
points of view, he concluded.

By PHILIP SUTIN
Taking up the challenge of Brit-
ish scientist J. Bronowski, Gener-
al Motors Corp. Vice-President Ed-.
ward N. Cole yesterday called for
the expanded development of
earth-bound sciences.
He quoted Bronowski, who fore-
saw changes in the use of atomic
energy, the control of energy
through automation and a biologi-
cal revolution with advanced med-
ical research, as key challenges
of the times.
"The matter of new sources of
energy, of course, is extremely vi-
tal. Some experts predict that our
supply of fossil fuels-which cur-
rently provides about 95 per cent
of the world's energy-could be
essentially exhausted within the
next few centuries," he noted.
Cheap Source
Cole saw the development of
atomic energy as a cheap and in-
finite power source. A mobile re-
actor being developed by General
Motors would provide 3000 kilo-
watts of energy anywhere and
could be used to handle varied
power needs now done with con-
ventional fuels, he asserted.
The cheapness of shipping atom-
ic materials will also expand power
use throughout the world, espe-
cially in underdeveloped areas, he
declared.

Announce New Social Studies Program

of the Office of Research Admin-
istration said.
The Branch is spending about
$6.9 million for research this fis-
cal year, significantly more than
the $5.5 million spent last year,
and its budget for fiscal 1964 is
likely to include a still greater
sum for research, McCormick
noted.
Congress has already allocated
funds to the project for 1963, and
they are available for basic and
applied research projects, curricu-
lum study centers and research
development activities in social
studies.'
Basic and applied research pro-
jects are for individuals or groups
with colleges, universities and
state educational agencies.
"Although many of these will
focus on improvement of instruc-
tion at various levels, more basic
studies which explore attitudes

toward other' cultures, develop-
ment of concepts of citizenship
and government in children and
studies of school-community re-
lationships are also appropriate,",
a bulletin on the project noted.
Curriculum study centers will
try to redefine the nature and
aims of the curriculum, develop
instructional methods, which will
achieve specific aims, try out and
evaluate newly developed mate-
rials and methods and dissemin-
ate most promising methods
a n d materials to interested
groups.
"A maximum of $25,000 will be
available to each center for the
first year of operation and $50,000
for each subsequent year. Such
centers would be expected to op-
erate for a period of about five
years," the project bulletin in-
dicated.
Research development activities
include individual projects, con-
ferences and seminars designed to
synthesize research that has been
done in particular areas of the
social studies and to stimulate
further research in the field.

EDWARD N. COLE
...'challenge'
Cole described progress in the
more effective utilization of me-
chanical energy. He said that gas
turbines "with the solution of
critical problems, could find its
place in the automotive spectrum
of the future."
Fuel Cells
Direct energy conversion, using
fuel cells, may be a viable large-
scale power source of the future,
but its cost must be reduced to
make it competitive with conven-
tional power sources, Cole noted.
Cole described General Motors'
use of computers in detailing the
second of Boronowski's challenges.
He said these instruments make it
possible to test hundreds of ap-
proaches in designing before it is
necessary to make models. -
He cited the computer's function
"as a valuable resource to man-
agement decision-making" and in
keeping records.
Other areas of automation in-
volve electro-chemical machining
of dies and the development of
semi-automatic production line
machines.
Cancer Cure?
"Medical advances will probab-
ly include the cure for cancer and
other dread diseases. Man's life
span will be further lengthened,
and the period of healthy and ac-
tive life will also be extended,"
Cole asserted.
Man, he said, will be able to
remake his biological environment,
including parts of the body and
mind.
"To those devoted to the pursuit
of scientific inquiry, there will al-
ways be limitless opportunities to
further the progress of man," he
said.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
THURSDAY, MARCH 14
DayCalendar
9:00 a.m.-Municipal Finance Officers
Training Institute-Registration: Rack-
ham Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Student
Laboratory Theatre-will present its
first production of the semester, "A
Lion Is as a Lion Roars," a. children's
play by Rachel Smith of the playwriting
class in the Dept. of English; Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg. Admission is free.
4:10 p.m.-Dept. of the History of Art
,Lecture-Prof. Frederick Hartt, The
Univ. of Penna., on "Art and Freedom
in 15th Century Florence": Aud. B,
Angell Hall.
4:15 p.m.--Lecture-John A. Wilson,
Prof. of Egyptology, The Oriental In-
stitute, Univ. of Chicago, will deliver
two lectures for the Dept. of Near East-
ern Studies. In Aud. C, Angell Hall,
Prof. Wilson Will speak on "Ancient
Egyptian Religions" and at 8:00 p.m.,
in the Rackham Amphitheatre, on "The
Study of Egyptology in the United
States." The public is invited to at-
tend both lectures.
5:30 p.m.--Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions Workshop-"Programmed Learn-
ing and Teaching Machines": Mich.
Union.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Marion Brando, Karl Malden, and Katy
Jurado in "One, Eyed Jacks": Archtec-
ture Aud.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
R. D. Low will speak on "A Doubly
Mixed Boundary value Problem for an
Elastic Layer" today at 4:00 p.m. in
Rm. 246 W. Engrg.
Refreshments will be in Rm. 350 W.
Engrg. at 3:30 p.m.
General Notices
opening on World Theatre Day, March
27: The U-M Players of the Dept. of
Speech present Frederico Garcia Lorca's
"The House of Bprnarda Alba," 8:00
p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Per-
formances Wed, through Sat. Tickets
now available by mail order to U-M
Players, Frieze Bldg., U-M, Ann Arbor at
$1.50 and $1.00 for the Wed. & Thurs.
performances. Fri. & Sat. performances
25c additional.
Undergrad Women Students now ,on
campus may apply for summer hous-
ing in independent cooperatives,
Friends' Center, league houses and sor-
orities at Rm. 510 (basement lobby),
Student Activities Bldg. on Thurs.,
March 14 at noon. After that date wom-
en may apply at the Affiliated and As-
sociated Housing Office, Rm. 1011, Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
Foreign Student Tuition scholarships:
The deadline for receipt of applications
is April 15. Forms are available from
the Counselors in the International
Center.

ship required. Seeking: Majors in flori-
culture, forestry, landscape arch., park
mgmt., recreation & any other phase
of liberal arts. Positions: Municipal
Forestry & Park Mgmt., Economists,
Mgmt. Trng., Office Mgmt., Personnel,
Publ. Admin., Publ. Rels., Purchasing,
Recreation, Social work, Stat., Traf-
fic, Trans., Writing-general, tech.
Ford Motor So., Detroit, Dearborn,
Nationwide-June & Aug. grads. Men.
U.S. citizenship required. Seeking: Lib-
eral Arts majors with special mention
of Econ., Psych., Law, Chem. Positions:
Economist, Elec. Computing, Market
Research, Personnel, Prod., Publ. Rels.,
Purchasing, Sales Promotion, Stat., De-
sign, Res. & Dev.
Marathon Oil Co., Findlay, Ohio-Men
(women-secretarial only). June & Aug.
grads. U.S. citizenship required. Seek-
ing: 1) Math students, and also women
in English, Speech, Journ., or Educ. who
are interested in secretarial work. 2)
Male grads interested in sales work.
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit-Men & women. Feb., June
& Aug. grads. U.S. citizenship required.
Seeking: Liberal Arts majors with spe-
cial mention of English & Sociology.
Positions: Insurance, Sales Trng.
American National Red Cross, 16 Mid-
west states & women recreation work-
ers for assignment in Korea-Men &
women. June & Aug. grads. U.S. citizen-
ship required. Seeking: Liberal Arts
majors with special mention of Soc.
& Psych. Positions: Service Private
Welfare Agency, Recreation, Secretarial,
Social Work (both BA & MA).
WED., MARCH 20-
American National Red Cross-(See
Tues.).
Ford Motor Co.-(See Tues.).
Public Health Service, Dept. of Health,
Educ. & Welfare, Chicago Region--Men
& women. June grads. U.S. citizenship
required. Seeking: Public Health can-
didates. Positions: Area Programs.
THURS., MARCH 21-
Washington National Insurance Co.,
Evanston, 11.-Men. June & Aug. grads.
U.S. citizenship required. Seeking: Lib-
eral Arts majors with special mention
of Econ. & English & also Psych. Posi-
tions: Actuarial, Insurance--home of-
fice, claims, Mgmt. Trng., Office Mgmt.,
Sales Promotion (no sales).
Prentice-Hall, Inc., Philadelphia, St.
Louis, Mo., Minneapolis, Minn. & others
-Men. Feb., June & Aug. grads. U.C.
citizenship required. Seeking: Liberal
Arts majors with special mention of
Econ., Poll. Sci., English, Geog., Soc.,
Psych., Hist., & Speech. Positions: Ter-
ritorial Sales.
The Service Bureau Corp., Detroit -
Men. June & Aug. grads. U.S. citizen-
ship required. Seeking: Liberal Arts ma-
jors. Positions: Territorial Sales. This is
a subsidiary of IBM with 80 branch of-
fices.
Chemical Bank New York Trust Co.,
N.Y.C.-Men. June & Aug. grads. U.S.
citizenship required. Seeking: Liberal
Arts mapor. Positions: Banking & Man-
agement Trng. Prog.
FRI., MARCH 22-
Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., Hart-
ford, Conn.-Men. Feb., June & Aug.
grads. Seeking: Liberal Arts students
for Field Reps. & Underwriters, Man-
agement Trng. Prog.
U.S. Army Recruiting-Women's Army
Corps, throughout U.S.-Women. Feb.,
June & Aug. grads. Seeking: all majors.
Positions: Officer Trng. Prog. for any
program used by the military services.

ceasing, Financial Mgmt., Mgmt. Analy-
sis, Operations Res. Analysis, Person-
nel Ad., Stat., Supply. Students who
have completed their Jr. yr. or more
are eligible. Details avail. at Summer
Placement. Students interested are urg-
ed to apply immed. as an exam is In-
volved.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Placement
Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg..
during the following hours: Mon. thru
Fri., 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5:00
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Bob Cope,
Part-time Interviewer, at NO 3-1511,
Ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Rm. 2300, daily.

FRIDAY, MARCH 15,2-5
SUMMER PLACEMENT BUREAU, S.A.B.

d

Today 4:10 P.M.
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building

MALE
1-Electrical Engnr. Jr. or Sr. with at
least a 3.00 grade average. Must be
a U.S. citizen and able to get secur-
ity clearance. Must also have trans-
portation. %-time position on a
long-term basis*.
2-Museum guides. Must have back-
ground in Natural Science, Geology
or Anthropology. Prefer junior level
or above. Must have the hours 10
a.m. until 12 noon free at least
three days per week.
FEMALE
2-Museum guides. Must have back-
ground in Natural Science. Geology
or Anthropology. Prefer junior level
or above. Must have the hours 10
a.m. until 12 noon free at least
three days per week.
1- -time permanent secretary with
training or experience. Must be
able to take shorthand and be
famaliar with medical terminology.
--Several Clerical people who can
work half days are needed. Typing
and/or shorthand experience is es-
sential.

An Original Play
A LION IS AS A LiON ROARS
by Rachel Smith

A

ATTENTION MICHIGAN MEN!
CAMP INDIANOLA FOR BOYS
MADISON, WISCONSIN
will interview COUNSELORS
for Waterfront, Land, and Craft Specialities

Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
Admission Free

Events

Estep Talks on Legal Aspects
Of Civil Rights, Social Action

at the LEAGUE

Dial
5-6290

By THOMAS DRAPER
"We have ideals, and we have a
way of carrying them out," Prof.
Samuel Estep of the Law School
said yesterday.
"In this country, the fundamen-
tal foundation for civil rights is
the judicial protection which the
government provides," Prof. Estep
said, discussing "The Legal Aspects
of Civil Rights." Social action must
be built on the basis of legal pro-
tections which are provided, he
added.
Defining the influence of the
federal structure of government,
Prof. Estep said, "There are two
sources of legal protection. You
must look to both federal and
state constitutions for civil rights
protection."
Ain't Necessarily So
"Most people think you have the
right to a trial by jury, but this is
not necessarily true," he said. "If
the federal courts are conducting
the trial, you do have this right;
but a state's constitution deter-
mines whether or not you have the
right to trial by jury in a court in
that state."
Citing another aspect of legal
procedures that affect civil rights,
Prof. Estep said that courts will
issue no abstract declaration of
rights. For the courts to interpret
constitutional rights, "there must
be a situation where your rights
are presently affected," he said.

in

"This places a limit on estab-
lishing your rights," he went on.
To discover whether a law violates
constitutional protections, the law
must usually be broken and chal-
lenged in court, Prof. Estep noted.
He said that the challenger must
keep in mind that if his interpre-
tation of constitutional protections
is incorrect, he goes to jail.
Necessary Evil
Answering a question on the
House Committee on Un-American
Activities and civil rights, Prof.
Estep said that he disagreed with
much that HUAC does, but that
congressional investigation is nec-
essary.
"Congress cannot pass intelli-
gent laws without information. We
should therefore not preclude the
congressional right of investiga-
tion. However, I would like to see
Congress crack down on the meth-
ods which HUAC uses," Prof. Es-
tep said.
He added that since a congres-
sional investigation is not a crim-
inal trial, the trial protections of
the Constitution do not apply. He
noted that the right of cross-
examination was denied in the in-
vestigations of HUAC.
Committee Sets
IFC Endorsement
Interfraternity Council's execu-
tive committee has listed five in-
dividuals it feels qualified for posts
on next year's IFC.
Its endorsements include Wil-
liam Harris, '63E, and Clifford
Taylor, '64, for president; Steven
Linker, '64BAd, for executive vice-
president; Richard Belger, '65E,
for administrative vice-president;
and Paul Robertson, '65E, for
treasurer.
IFC elections are March 26.

Doctoral Examination for Duilio Per-
uzzi, Geography; thesis: "Cortona: Ar
Valley-Hill-Mountain Complex of Modi-t
fled Mediterranean Agriculture in Cen-
tral Italy," Fri., March 15, 210 Angell
Hal, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman, Georgec
Kish.@
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS,Bureau
of Appts., Seniors & grad students,
please call Ext. 3544 for appts. with the
following:
TUES., MARCH 19-
Detroit Civil Service-Men & women.
Feb., June & Aug. grads. U.S. citizen-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Mis-
sions Conferette-Speakers, panels, film,
discussions, General Topic: "Missions
in a Modern World," Begins March 15 at
7:30 p.m., Continued Saturday, Union.
* * *
Phi Sigma Society, Illustrated Lec-
ture, March 18, 8 p.m., Rackham Bldg.,
W. Conf. Rm. Speaker: Prof. W. H. Wag-
ner, Jr., Dept. of Botany, "Modern Re-
search on Evolution as Illustrated by
Ferns."
* * *
WAA Coeducational Fencing Club,
Meeting, March 14, 7:30 p.m., WAB.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, Week-
ly Meeting, March 14, 7:30 p.m., 528D
SAB.
We of
MARILYN MARK'S
-welcome you to use
the facilities of our
BEAUTY SALON

SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
Camp Con-es-toga, Mich.-Will Inter-
view on Fri., March 15 (NOT Thurs.,
March 14 as previously stated). Posi-
tions for men in water skiing & riflery
and women in music & as a nurse.
Dept. of the Army, Wash., D.C.-Spe-
cial prog. for college students to work
as summerInterns in the Wash.,D.C.
area. Rep, fields: Automatic Data Pro-

at Trueblood Aud.

118I

Tickets at Box Office

THE MICHIGAN UNION
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

$20-$250-~$300

Cf

Presents on Thursday
March 14

THEATER:

"The Lion is as the Lion Roars"

Arena Theatre-Frieze Building... .4:10 p.m.

FORUM:

Student Composer's Forum-Aud. A

Angell Hall . . 30p.m.

See the Bharatya Kala Kendra
Dancers Tuesday, March 19, 8:30

PHOTOGRAPHY DISPLAY: All
Lobby

Day ...

Union

ART SHOW: Union North Lounge
3-5 and 7:30-10:30 p.m.

'IV

Tomorrow:
March 15

Recital of Ann Arbor Piano Teachers'
Folklore Society Concert-Bonnie Dobson
Photography Display
Art Show

IT'S HERE !

A NIGHT
ON THE WORLD
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Sat., March 16th-9:00

548 Church St.
662-3055 or
662-4276

2222 Fuller Rd.
663-8155 or
663-9738

..

I

1I

4C CINEMA GUILD P4ehit4

ENDING
TON IGHT

I

a

-fl

EXCIING, CHALLENGING,
PASSIONATE, REMARKABLEI"M
Wafter 2eny. ff.,.d TaOUn
CINEMA ART IN ITS MOST
MODERN ASPECT"

1

Thursday and Friday at 7:00 and 9:20
MARLON BRANDO'S
"ONE-EYED JACKS"

Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
'The DEVIL'S WANTON'

I

I

I

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