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March 12, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY", MARCH 12.1962

TH IHIA ALITJ AV AW 1 fR

L AC v ITACX-%-)AA AlN 1JUJ

'OREIGN STUDENTS:
Abrams ExaminesProgram

De Grazia Views Change
To 'One Man, One Vote'

CANOES, COVERED WAGONS:
Spring Weekend Brings 'Old West' Air

By LOUISE LIND
"Much emphasis is laid on pro-
gramming activities for the inter-
national student because his short
stay in a foreign country allows
little time for developing a mean-
ingful, cross-cultural program,"
Howard Abrams, '63, said recently.
Speaking at the United States
National Association-Internation-
al Student Association, Abrams
said this was necessary to break
the usual feeling of isolation and
alienation from the American stu-
dent community and from Ameri-
can society as a whole.
,Thus, he pointed out, most pro-
grams have two goals in common:
the establishment of increased
communication on an individual
and institutional basis and the
breakdown of the foreign stu-
dent's estrangement.
Abrams analyzed two operating
programs, one sponsored by US-
NSA offering full scholarships to
15-20 foreign students based on
leadership and the International
Brother Program, sponsored by
the Michigan Union and Women's
League.
Pell EXplains
Corps Value
Special To The Daily
WASHINGTON-The proposed
Youth Conservation Corps is "de-
signed to develop marketable skills
in those who enroll in it with an
aim toward employing these young
people within the community,"
Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-RD said
recently.
Speaking to a United States
National Student Association Con-
ference on. the National Service
Corps, Pell attempted to explain
Senate bill S1, proposing a YCC
and a Hometown Youth Corps.
These programs, unlike the pro-
posed National Service Corps, is
not designed to use the skills of
college students. In fact, the pro-
grams are designed to train young
men in the YCC and young men
and women in the hometown corps
to develop skills which will make
them employable. It is also aimed
at aiding the high school "drop-
out" and encourage him to "re-
sume and maintain school attend-
ance."
"There is no question that a
problem of major importance
exists. This is a human problem.
It is an unpardonable waste of
our most precious resource -
people," he explained. %
While he noted that the "Youth
Employment Opportunities Act
(S1) is not the alchemist's dream
come true," he saw it as a part
in a widespread program aimed at
the youth of the nation.

While he criticized the USNSA
group for its "elitist" aspect, its
"semi-manipulative approach to
human beings," and its inability
to, be administered on a broader
scale, Abrams emphasized that
"anything of this intensity, if it
is to have any degree of success,
must specialize and cannot be
operated on a broad scope."
Viewing the International
Brother Program, he indicated a
few of the problems the organiza-
tion is faced with.
"The Americans participating in
this program have not been equip-
ped to handle their end of the
bargain," he said. "The interna-
tional student is too often viewed
by Americans as a person of little
complexity, which he certainly is
not. Students here must learn how
to deal with him."
Structure Problems
Then too, Abrams noted, the
very structure of the American
campus presents a problem to
such programming organizations.
"The American campus, where ac-
tivities like Michigras and Spring
Weekend draw the biggest groups
of participants, represents a post-
adolescent culture," he said.
"The international student is far
more mature and sophisticated
than the average American stu-
dent. He is often a graduate stu-
dent, thus operating on a different
level than the groups who would
draw him into their activities. He
cannot be asked to regress, to take
part in Homecoming and .other
such activities that operate at a'
level he has passed."
Other problems the foreign stu-
dent finds on the American cam-
pus, Abrams noted, are ones re-
sulting from racism. Some of these
are illustrated by the difficulty of
procuring suitable housing and the
proposal of dating American stu-
dents.
Success Possible
Despite these problems, Abrams
maintained that he still thought
successful programming is possible.
"The basic thing to look for in
programming events in which both
American and international stu-
dents will be involved is that point
where there is a coincidence of
needs and desires-an overlap of
mutual interests-as in the World
University Service," he comment-
ed.
In the afternoon session, a panel
discussion of the strengths and
Potter To Speak
At Voice Forum
The sixth Voice Forum on
American Society will be held at
8 p.m. today in the Multi-purpose
Room of the UGLI. Paul Potter,
Grad, will be speaking on "Uni-
versity Reform."

HOWARD ABRAMS
. .. Americans immature
weaknesses of programming at the
University pointed up several areas
in which improvements could be
implemented.
One such area was the ISA it-
self, and one of the members of
its staff pointed out that "the ISA
is not drawing fully on its re-
sources."
Coordinate Contact
A second method of improving
programming at the University
would be to more closely coordin-
ate the contact between University
departments studying special areas
and foreign students, the panel
agreed.
Finally, greater communication
and coordination among the
groups currently working on this
campus with foreign students was
cited as a way to improve Uni-
versity programming.
It was suggested that one in-
dividual be appointed by Student
Government Council to coordinate
these groups, including the League,
Union, Assembly Association, ISA,
NSA, Junior and Senior Panhel-
lenic Associations and residence
halls. This individual would ibe
selected on a semester basis and
would replace the now defunct
SGC International Relations
Board.
The committee was composed of
members and representatives of
the ISA, Panhel, Assembly, Union,
USNSA, SGC's USNSA committee
and nationality clubs.

By THOMAS DRAPER
We are in the midst of a
sweeping tide to alter all repre-
sentative systems in favor of a
single 'one man, one vote' doc-
trine, Prof. Alfred de Grazia of
New York University said yester-
day.
This single doctrine of repre-
sentation is a misinterpretation of
history and reflects the failure
of the understaffed field of po-
litical science to adeouately han-
die the theory of representation,
Prof. de Grazia, editor of "The
American Behavioral Scientist,"
said.
He said that the Supreme Court
ruling in Baker vs. Carr (estab-
lishing that equal representation
is a judicial end not political
issue) may well prove to be
"watershed of future constitu-
tional reform."
Pillars of Federalism
"Federalism rests on several
,illars," Prof. de Grazia said.
Among these pillars are an inde-
pendent federal and state police
force, courts and legislative power
Creal Rapped
On Inaction
By Schneider
Dr. Albert F. Schneider, candi-
date for mayor of Ann Arbor, said
recently that incumbent Mayor
Cecil 0. Creal has not worked
hard enough to obtain sufficient
funds for the University's opera-
tion.
Schneider hit Creal for his hes-
itancy to criticize the groups in
Lansing responsible for University
appropriations. He noted that
more money would make year-
round University operations pos-
sible and cited the benefits such
a plan would bring to Ann Arbor.
He claimed that Creal had "rap-
ped the Democratic State Admin-
istrative Board for its willingness
to discriminate against the Uni-
versity" and had released a state-
ment saying that he would "not
hesitate to act at any time when
the vital interests of the Univer-
sity and the city are at stake."
But, said Schneider, "is it the
change in party affiliation of the
governor which causes his present
inaction?'

to pursue their goals in the ma-
ner they see fit. The last of these
is undermined by the Baker vs.
Carr decision.
The power of the state and fed-
eral courts is at stake in this de-
cision, he said. "The Attorney
General and President John F.
Kennedy have been doing what-
ever possible to enforce a decision
that assumes for the federal gov-
ernment state legislative and judi-
cial authority.
The form of representation in
the states should be determined
independently by the state gov-
ernments, Prof. de Grazia said.
Representation System
Posing the question, 'What
form of representation do we
want?" Prof. de Grazia suggested
the following guide line for a rep-
resentation system.
"We need representatives from
geographic districts w i t h o u t
quotas given from an area.
"We need occupational repre-
sentatives. This is an important
and viable constituency. We ask
responsibility from this grouping
yet deny representation.
Muster Votes
"We need a group of free rep-
resentatives that are elected at
large. This would allow the elec-
torate to muster votes around a
single man or idea."
Prof. de Grazia said that such
a free constituency representative
system would create a great in-
crease in participation and in-
terest in state politics.
'U Drill Team
Places First
The Michigan Pershing Rifle
Drill Team won first place in class
A exhibition drill at the Illinois
Invitation Drill Meet in Cham-
paign recently.
Michigan was awarded 983
points out of a possible 1200. Pur-
due, the 1962 champions, came
out second, 22 points behind Mich-
igan. Pennsylvania Military Col-
lege and Loyola University placed
third and fourth respectively.
Placing fifth in last year's na-
tional championship, Michigan's
exhibition drill team will be com-
peting for the coveted first place
award this spring vacation at the
Cherry Blossom Festival in Wash-
ington, D. C. Fifty teams will be
competing.
The Pershing Rifles-was founded
in 1891 by General.John J. Per-
shing at the University of Nebras-
ka. The local outfit was formed to
create a spirit of cooperation be-
tween the three ROTC organiza-
tions on campus.
The "PR's" branched out to oth-
er schools, but lost prestige dur-
ing World War I and disbanded.
The organization was re-formed in

By KAREN MARGOLIS
Spring Weekend '63 will take on
the air of the Old West, complete
with covered wagons, canoe races
and gambling booths.
Competitive events will have
entries by pairs of men's and
women's housing units.
The deadline for sign-ups is 5
p.m. today on the second floor of
the Michigan Union. Since the

ly all pairs plan to enter the
canoe race scheduled for Satur-
day, April 27, at Island Park on
the Huron River. There are no
limits placed on the number al-
lowed to participate in this event.
The covered wagon and buck-
board competition is in two parts,
with Friday afternoon featuring
the competition for the most
unique and interesting scene de-
picting what is under the covers
of the wagon. Only live people
and costumes will be used; no
paper mache is allowed.
'Transformation'
Saturday afternoon will see the
same vehicles transformed into
buckboars and challenging an ob-
stacle course representing the
hazards of travel in the Old West.:

U

dRAMM

Shows at 7-9 P.M.
Dial 8-6416

The buckboard will be pulled by
six men and driven by three
women, all from the respective
housing units. The limit of 18 to
20 pairs of units has already been
reached for these events.
Trophies will be awarded to all
winners Saturday night - Skit
Night in Hill Auditorium.
Aptheker To Talk
On Proclamatin
Herber Aptheker, editor of
P>litical Affairs magazine, will
lecture on "The Emancipation
Proclamation Now and 100 Years
Ago" at 4:15 p.m. today in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.

I I

U.

SPRING WEEKEND
... early line
events are being signed on a first-
come, first-served basis, housing
units came out in large numbers
yesterday when the sign-ups
began.
More Pairs Expected
Sofar, 28, or 56 units are
participating. More are expected
after today's sign-up period. Near-

'EXCITING, CHALLENGING, I
PASSIONATE, REMARKABLE!"
W*terTeny. HJler~w T#h
CINEMA ART IN ITS MOST
MODERN ASPECTI"
the
lovers
of teruel
A C W # IMmsigsitmMCuur A siy' /-
mu A fwma R w 4IEmww~g U

:j

I

COMING FRIDAY
"Carry On Teacher"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

1963 SOPH SHOW
CENTRAL COMMITTEE

MASS MEETING

THURSDAY, MARCH 14
at the LEAGUE

7:30

0

|NOW

(Thi'11[4!IIC VI

Dial
5-6290

rT T

I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
TUESDAY, MARCH 12
Day Calendar
4:10 p.m.-Dept. of the History of Art
Lecture-Prof. Frederick Hartt, The
Univ. of Penn., on "An Anti-Humanist
in the Midst of the Renaissance": Aud.
B, Angell Hall.
8:30 p.m.Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions Workshop-"Programmed Learn-
ing and Teaching Machines": Mich.
Union.i
8:30 p.m.-Univ. Musical Society Con-
cert--Toronto Symphony Orchestra:
Hill Aud.
Circle Honorary Society will meet to-
night, Wed., and Thurs. evenings at 7
p.m. in the League (Tues. and Wed. in
the Cave, Thurs. in Conference Rm. I).
Illustrated Public Lecture by Prof.
Frederick Hartt of the University of
Pennsylvania-"An Anti-HumanistIn
the Midst of the Renaissance." Aud.
B, Angell Hall, 5 p.m., Tues., March 12.
Sponsored by the Department of the
History of Art.
Joint Meeting of the Math Club and
Math Colloquium: Meets Tues., March
12, at 8 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre. Prof. Gerald Sacks, Cornell Uni-
versity, will-be speaking on "A Funda-
mental Theorem for Quantification.
Theory." All graduate students are in-'
vited to attend.
Refreshments will be served in the
West Conference Rm. after the talk.
General Notices
Opening on World Theatre Day, March
27: The U-M Players of the Dept. of
Speech present Frederico Garcia Lorca's
"The House of Bernarda Alba," 8:00
p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Per-
formances Wed, through Sat. Tickets
now available by mail order to U-M
Players, Frieze Bldg., U-M, Ann Arbor at
$1.50 and $1.00 for the Wed. & Thurs.
performances. Fri. & Sat. performances
25c additional.
Foreign Visitors
Following are the foreign visitors
programmecl through the International
j

Center who will be on campus this
week on the dates indicated. Program
arrangements are being made by Mrs.
Clifford R. Miller, Ext. 3358, Interna-
tional Center.
Mladen Zvonarevic, Professor, Faculty
of Philosophy, University of Zagreb,
Yugoslavia, March 4-April 4.
Jose M. Pojan, Assistant Engineer, Di-
vision of National Parks, Ministry of
Agriculture, Venezuela, March 7-12.
Alberto Bruzual, Assistant to Affor-
estation Chief, Ministry of Agriculture,
Venezuela, March 7-12.
Siegfried Richter, Director, Austro-
American Institute of Education, Vien-
na, Austria, March 10-13.
Habib Tanvir, Free lance director,
producer, playwright, New Delhi, India,
March 13.
Events
Sociedad Hispanica: Wed., March 13,
8:00 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Prof. Monroe
Z. Hafter will speak in Spanish on "La
Objectividad en la Novela Moderna Es-
pagnole." Refreshments and conversa-
tion afterwards.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call Ext. 3544 for interview
appointments with the following:
THURS., MARCH 14-
The Upjohn Co., Mich., Ohio & Ind.
-Men. Seeking: Degree in Chem., Phar-
macy, Bacti., & Biochem. Position: Sales
territories.
Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago-Men.
Seeking: Liberal Arts students, with
majors in Econ., English, Fine Arts, &
especially Design & Journalism. Posi-
tions: Advertising including Art (lay-
out), Writing (copy), Market Research
& Merchandising. U.S. citizenship re-
quired.
Union Carbide Consumer Products
Co., Chicago - Men. Seeking: Liberal
(Continued on Page 8)
ELECT
SCLAR
for Board in Control
of Student Publications
PRESENTLY
BUSINESS MANAGER of
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4
BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
an

Michigall Bell makes few moves in Southfield without
consulting Engineer Cal Crimp (B.S.E.E., 1957). Cal
makes studies on where to put new central offices, how to
expand old ones, what switching equipment to order.
To make these decisions, Cal must interpret forecasts
of customer growth. He must also know his equipment and
operating costs closely. Such responsibility is not new to

him. On an earlier assignment, for instance, he skillfully
directed a drafting section of 32 people.
Cal Crimp of Michigan Bell Telephone Company and
the other young engineers like him in Bell Telephone
Companies throughout the country help bring the finest
communications service in the world to the homes and
businesses of a growing America!

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
SALUTE: CAL CRIMP

fl

I

UOLUM U Srn tsfA SYtELE PHUUUTIOUNAAISIO
DIAMOND HEADm
COMING
"FREU D"

Uma..

I

DIAL 2-6264

ENDING
WEDNESDAY
Shows at 1:00-2:55-5:00-
7:05 and 9:18

I

5

ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS! including

I

* BEST ACTOR * BEST ACTRESS
-BEST SONG
It is different.
It'is daring.

4

Most of all, in its
own terrifying
way, it is
a love story..
Aw ,I - _ -.-.

DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL AND
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
present
B DREFCK

:, .

i

I

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