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March 10, 1963 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-10

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MARCH 10, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

MARCh 10. 19S~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY WAGE THREE

Farm Problem Presents Enigma

By OVID A. MARTIN
Associated Press Farm Writer
WASHINGTON - A surplus of
uncertainties hangs over the fu-
ture of one big national problem,
surplus food stocks.
It may be that they'll be re-
duced.
No one knows for sure whether
these stocks, which amounted to
about $6.5 billion worth in 1962,
will increase or grow less in 1963.
Agriculture department officials
hope for, and expect, some decline.
Cold War
However, weather uncertainties
alone make exact predictions out
of the question. The turns that
may be taken by the cold war also
would have to be taken into con-
sideration. The amount that may
be needed abroad in Food for
Peace and other programs is an-
vother unknown element.
Europe may become more self-
sufficient. Secretary of Agriculture
Orville Freeman speculated after
a trip to Europe that the new
Common Market there might cut
off European imports of American
farm products about $600 million
worth.
The government stores farm
commodities in carrying out pro-
grams for price support, surplus
removal and stabilization. These
programs have been criticized by
some as a subsidy the taxpayers in
general are forced to provide for
the benefit of farmers who busily
produce more than is needed. One
argument for extensive storing of
food, on the other hand, is that it
would be invaluable in event of
war.
So Big
At the time of the Soviet-Cuban
crisis, Freeman said United States
food stocks were so large that only
a widespread conflict like World
War II would require all-out farm
production.
He said that if that crisis led
only to a limited Korean-type con-
flict there would be no need for
change in any farm production
policies. He added that a re-evalu-
ation would be needed if nuclear
war were to come "because no one
knows what such a war would do."
A master plan was worked out
more than a year ago for the agri-
culture department to take con-
trol of all food and agricultural.
supplies if war should come, Free-
man said.
List Costs
The costs of storing, handling,
transporting-and of losses involved
in sales of government-owned
farm surpluses were $126 million
in 1953, $546 million in 1954, $980
million in 1959, $971 million in
1960, $964 million in 1961 and an
estimated $925 million in 1962.
No estimates are available for
1963 or 1964. but officials hope
that a combination of factors-
weather, crops controls and in-
creased demand-will make it
possible to lower these costs a
little in each of these years.
The value of government-stored
commodities was around $2.5 bil-
lion in 1953, $5.5 billion in 1954,
$5.6 billion in 1955, $7.5 billion in
1956, $8.7 billion in 1957, $6.8 bil-
lion in 1958, $8 billion in 1959, $7.9
billion in 1960, $6.9 billion in 1961
and $6.5 billion in 1962.

tt m r s
.4 .
-I. 8,000
JYy
7,000-
5,000-

R w f
i lY,
i
«w.
A
4

0 THE SURPLUS
VALUE 1953-62
in millions of dollars
--- __ _ _ __ _ _ __ _

4,000-
3,000
2,000-
1,000-
i

Feel Coup
Not Pawn
Of Egypt
By LEWIS GULICKF
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON-United States
experts assessed the new Syrian
regime as oriented toward Arab1
unity in general, rather than to
Egypt and Egyptian President
Gamal Abdel Nasser alone.
Washington appeared to have
no major objections to recogni-
tion of the new Damascus leader-
ship, which seized power by coup
Friday.
Thus establishment of diplomat-1
ic relations is expected soon after
the usual preliminaries.
Consultation1
These include consultation with
other countries and assurances
from the new Syrian government'
that it will live up to its interna-
tional commitments.
Jordan, which has close ties
with Washington, is one of the
Arab states that already have ex-s
tended recognition to the new gov-
ernment headed by Salah Bitar.
The coup is regarded here as a
moderate swing back from the bit-
ter split with the United Arab Re-,
public which occurred when the
previous Damascus regime seized
power a year and a half ago.
Foreign Minister
Bitar was Syrian foreign minis-
ter when his country joined Egypt
in 1958 to form the UAR.
The expectation here is that Bi-
tar's group is more interested in
close and friendly association with
both Egypt and Iraq-the two big
powers in the Arab world.
Bitar, it is thought, tends to-
ward a loose federation, or con-
federation, among the Arab states.
Ba'ath Founder
He is founder of the Ba'ath
Arab Unity Party, the only non-
Communist political movement or-
ganized across national lines in
the Middle East.
Under this analysis, the new
Syrian regime would be undertak-
ing a balancing role in the Arab
world, linking Nasser's Egypt -
which aspires to Arab leadership
-with rival Iraq.
Neutralist
Bitar and his associates are re-
garded as neutralist in terms of
the cold war, with their prime in-
terest Arab nationalism.
The Syrian revolt, coming on
the heels of Iraq's revolution and
only a little longer after the over-
throw of Yemen's feudal regime,
suggests that Arab . Socialism is
gaining more and more influence
among the Arab nations.
It also brought into question the
future of such regimes as Jordan's
King Hussein and Saudi Arabia's
King Ibn Saud. Some observers
feel that if the Syrian regimenman-
ages to stabilize the country, it
could be a part of a nucleus of
Arab nations that would work to
overthrow these kingdoms.
Iraq Executes
Red Officials
BAGHDAD (P-Iraq's military
governor announced yesterday
three top executives of the Iraqi
Communist Party were executed
after being court martialed on
charges of killing civilians and sol-
diers and inciting masses against
the government.
The executions were the first
announced since the anti-Commu-
nist government took over here
after the Feb. 8 revolution that
overthrew and killed Iraqi Presi-

dent Abdel Karim Kassem.

DEVELOPMENT RATE:
France Aids Former Colonies

By ANDREW BOROWIEC
Associated Press News Analyst
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast-Nearly
three years after a wave of in-
dependence shattered the French
empire in Africa, most of the for-
mer colonies continue to depend
on France for help and advice.
From the Sahara republic of
Mauritania to the island of Mada-
gascar off East Africa, France con-
trols the rate of development of
its former possessions. ,
The euphoria of independence
is still gripping Africa and with
it the yen for expensive prestige
projects and costly trips abroad.
France has been footing much of
the bill.
Repercussions
Some foreign diplomats fear
that a sudden change of policy in
France regarding Africa could
have grave repercussions. But most
of French-speaking Africa con-
tinues to have confidence in
France and its aid.
The 12-nation African and Mal-
agacy Union which emerged from
the French African possessions is
a conservative bloc, gaiiing more
and more influence in Africa.
Two former French colonies-
Guinea and. Mali-tried Marxism
and ties with the Soviet bloc. Dis-
satisfied with the experiment, they
are trying to find a new, more
practical formula.
Isolationism
Togo, once administered by
France under the United Nations
trusteeship, has pursued an isola-
tionist course since its 1960 in-
dependence. Its future is uncertain
following the killing of President
Sylvanus Olympio Jan. 13.
According to French estimates,
France has been spending $1.26
billion a year to aid underdevelop-
ed nations, most of them in Africa.
This amounts to 2.4 per cent of
French national revenue.
The aid covers subsidies to na-
tional budgets and balance of pay-
ment deficits, subsidizes prices for
some agricultural products and
maintains 9000 French experts in
African nations.
At this stage, Senegal, Ivory
Coast and Gabon are the only Af-
rican and Malagasy Union mem-
bers not receiving direct budget
aid from France.
Much of France's African ac-

tivity is regarded as a personal
project of French President Char-
les de Gaulle, who directed the
French overseas territories' evolu-
tion first to internal autonomy,
then to independence.
Thus Gaullism has become vir-
tually an article of faith to many
African politicians. Some French-
speaking chiefs of state openly
imitate de Gaulle, copying his poli-
tical reforms and adopting his
manner of speaking.
"Africa is full of little de
Gaulles," ironically remarked a

British diplomat in a West African
capital.
France regards as a success the
process of decolonization of its
former African empire. Officials
point to the gradual, bloodless ac-
cession to independence of 15 na-
tions, all united with the bonds
of a common language, education-
al and administrative systems.
Most of the French-speaking
states are still trying hard to
develop their own personalities.
Politically, they have adopted the
presidential system.

"LONDON'S STAGE SENSATION"

I -I ! I I -- I - I - 1

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1953 1954

1955. 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962,

""AP NewsteaturesI

SHUBERT
THEATRE
Detroit
Mon., Mar. 11-
Sat., Mar. 16

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WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Accuse U.S. of Using Poison

By The Associated Press
TOKYO--The New China News
Agency reported yesterday that
about 200,000 North: Vietnamese
held meetings and demonstrations
to protest spraying of 'noxious
chemicals" in South Viet Nam.
The agency's Hanoi dispatch
charged the United States and
South Vietnamese governments
are spraying the chemicals "to
poison innocent South Vietnamese
people and devastate crops."
* * *
VIENNA -Franziskus Cardinal
Koenig returned home yesterday,
affirming he is going to Commu-
nist Hungary but without specific
orders from Pope John XXIII to
bring back Josef Cardinal Minds-
zenty. Sources in Vatican City
reported Friday that Cardinal

'Er!

Koenig was going to Budapest in
an attempt to arrange Mindszen-
ty's safe passage to Rome-but
only if the Hungarian primate
wanted to go.
NEW DELHI-The Dalai Lama
marked the fourth anniversary of
the Lhasa rebellion against Tibet's
Red Chinese captors yesterday by
issuing a constitution guaranteeing
civil liberties in Tibet. The docu-
ment is intended as the law of
Tibet if the Buddhist kingdom
ever shakes off Peking's rule.
* *
MADRID-Gen. Francisco Fran-
co, said yesterday Spain will seek
to achieve its economic, social and
political goals by following the
trends established 25 years ago.
Franco said Spanishndesires to
line up with other countries do
not mean political trends are to
change in Spain.
HAVANA-Brazilian Communist
leader Luis Carlos Prestes recent-
ly said violent revolution is not
necessarily the way to Commu-
nist government in Brazil. Prestes
follows the Kremlin line of peace-
ful coexistence with the West, con-
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trasting to the Red Chinese hard
line that is followed by other Bra-
zilian leftists.
MOSCOW--The head of the So-
viet Union's chemical industry was
demoted yesterday. The action ap-
peared to be part of Soviet Pre-
mier Nikita S. Khrushchev's drive
to catch up with the West in syn-
thetic materials production.
. . *s
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) -
Demonstrators surged through this
capital Friday night demanding
for Somalia a strip of Kenya near
what is known as Kenya's north-
ern frontier district. The issue has
heated up because of Britain's de-
cision to grant Kenya self-rule
later this year.
BOWLING GREEN - Broad
outlines of foreign policy should
coincide with the thinking of the
American people, but the means
by which these policies are work-
ed out and put into operation
"are and must be the work of
trained diplomats," Sen. J. Wil-
liam Fulbright (D-Ark) said here
yesterday.
. . .
ST. PAUL-The lengthly Min-
nesota governor recount trial may
come to a climax in the next
week or 10 days withnan attempt
by Republicans to show that there
is just as big a cjuestionmark
hanging over the recount as the
original election. With the trial
in weekend recess, Democrat Karl
Rolvaag holds a lead of 78 votes
in unofficial figuring over Repub-
lican Gov. Elmer L. Andersen.

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