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March 09, 1963 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-09

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)

AY, MARCH 9, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGnE rEE

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Rusk Reports Russians
Beginning Withdrawal
~Of Troops from Island
°' To Postpone

Parties Reach Formula
To End New York Strike
NEW YORK (P)-Publishers and printers reached agreement yes-
terday on a formula for ending New York's three-month newspaper
blackout.
But eight closed dailies still appeared at least a week away from
resuming publication.
The formula was proposed by Mayor Robert F. Wagner.
$100 Million
The shutdown has cost the industry alone at least $100 million.
Fringe losses to the business community as a whole were incalculable.
NPublishers and leaders of striking

r

. .
--,

The University of Michigan Newman Club
Presents the
CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE SERIES
Sunday, March 10, 7:30 P.M.
"Physical Aspects of Marriage"

Baker Resigns

Assessment Over Closure
Of Numbers Of O'Neill Play

} -AP wirepioto
'TURNING CORNER'-United States Secretary of State Dean
Rusk told reporters yesterday that the United States is "turning
an important corner" in the fight against communism in South
Viet Nam.
OPPOSITION LABOURITES:
Macmillan Fears Loss
Coin British Vote
LONDON WP)-Prime Minister Harold Macmillan confessed yes-
terday his Conservative Party may lose Britain's coming election.
H6 began pondering a new government shakeup to avert that
possibility.
The British leader roused a rally of Tory chieftains by predicting
that in a straight fight their party could beat the opposition Laborites.
But then *he expressed concern about the role the tiny middle-road
"Liberal party may play. He warn-

Officials Say Force '
On Island at 17,000
WASHINGTON (P) - Secretary
of State Dean Rusk reported yes-
terday some Soviet troops are
leaving Cuba and enough Russian
shipping is en route to pull out
several thousand soldiers within a
week. ,
The Kremlin sent word Feb. 181
that it intended to withdraw "sev-
eral thousand" military personnel
by mid-March, and as Rusk put it
"we are . . . watching that with-
drawal with very great interest."
Speaking at his second W'Ash-
ington news conference this year,
Rusk declined to "get into the
boxscore of running figures" on
the numbers of Russians soldiers
in or leaving Cuba. "Somewhat
later" the United States govern-
ment will make an assessment
"about exactly what this with-
drawal amounts to," he said.
Military Men
Other United States officials are
sticking to previous estimates that
about 17,000 Soviet military men
still are in Cuba, down from a
high of about 22,000 during last
October's missile crisis.
The number who have departed
so far in the current withdrawal
is figured roughly at several hun-
dred.
Rusk said ships have been mov-
ing into Cuba in the past two
weeks, and enough moreare on
the way to make possible with-
drawal of several thousand Rus-
sian troops by the March 15 dead-
line.
Russian Men
What the United States would
do about the Russian men and
arms still in Cuba after that date
was not stated. President John F.
Kennedy's tactic has been to focus
on Soviet withdrawals one step at
a time, starting with the long-
range missiles and bombers, which
were pulled out last fall.
"We are turning an important
corner" in the long and costly
fight against the Reds in South
Viet Nam. Capture of Communist
arms has increased dramatically,
Communist defections have grown
rapidly, Vietnamese villagers and
mountain folk are voluntarily aid-
ing the Vietnamese government,
and Red Viet Cong attacks have
dropped to half the 1962 rate,j
Rusk said.
While "this kind of warfare is
bitter and mean and is likely to
extend for some time, . . . we are
encouraged by the progress."
Rusk said the approximately 600
Americans in Syria appear to be
safe and unharmed in the latest'
rebellion against the Syrian gov-

WACO (P)-Paul Baker, Baylor
University's drama chairman, his
wife and 11 drama staff members
resigned yesterday in a dispute
over retention of profane language
in an Eugene O'Neill play produc-
tion.
The president of the Baptist
school A b n e r McCall, closed
O'Neill's Pulitzer Prize-winning
paly, "Long Day's Journey into
Night," in mid-run Dec. 6 after
Baker refused to do so at Mc-
Call's request. O'Neill's widow had
stipulated the play could not be
censored when she agreed to the
Baylor production.
McCall said yesterday the play
violated long-standing university
policy against productionscon-
taining "vulgar, profane or blas-
phemous language . . . or which
ridicule the Christian religion."
Trinity University, a Presbyter-
ian school at San Antonio, immedi-
ately announced Baker will be-
come head of its drama depart-
ment. Trinity President James
Laurie said his school has given
Baker, a former Trinity student,
no pledge of academic freedom,
but will consider hiring any of the
resigned Baylor faculty members
who apply.
Baker and the 11 staff members
will continue to operate the Dallas
Theatre Center, which Baker or-
ganized several years ago.
Baker, 51, twice has been presi-
dent of the National Theatre Con-
ference and has headed regional
theatre associations.
Leaders See
Independence
For Kenya
NAIROBI OP)-Two Kenya Afri-
can National Union leaders, Tom
Mboya and James Gichuru, jub-
ilantly told reporters yesterday:
"It will be independence for Ken-
ya this year."
They had just emerged from 51/
hours of final talks with Colonial
Secretary Duncan Sandys. Mboya
said a general election will be held
in about two months.
The Kenya African Democratic
Union president, Ronald Ngala,
said his party was pleased with
the outcome of the talks.
Referring generally to Sandys'
decisions on points of disagree-
ment over the new constitution,
Mboya said a formula had been
worked out for several points for
flexibility.

Local 6, AFL-CIO International
Typographical Union, accepted
Wagner's non-binding recommen-
dations in the early hours of the
morning. The package will be
spread over a two-year contract
span.
Bertram A. Powers, president of
Local 6, said he and his negotiat-
ing committee wanted to reject
Wagner's recommendations. But*
top national officials of the ITU
accepted the terms, and Powers
said the local committee will rec-
ommend adoption by the member-
ship.
However, contract language and
some unresolved minor issues re-
mained to be worked out before a
new contract can be submitted to
3000 Local 6 printers for a ratifi-
cation vote. A union spokesman
said the vote could not be held
before late next week.
Also, eight other newspaper
craft unionsare pressing for new
contracts with the Publishers As-
sociation of America, including two
that joined the printers strike, the
mailers and the stereotypers.
There was no immediate indica-
tion whether the price of newspa-
pers would go up.
Bonn Accepts
Nuclear Force
BONN (P)-Chancellor Konrad
Adenauer gave a reluctant go-
ahead yesterday to- President John
K. Kennedy's plan for a multi-na-
tion seaborne nuclear force for the
Atlantic alliance.
The proposed force would give
West Germany its first voice in
the use of nuclear weapons, but
the United States still would main-
tain a veto. Bonn's agreement,
however reluctant, was considered
vital.
Adenauer wants nuclear rockets
capable of hitting the Soviet Un-
ion to be stationed on West Ger-
man soil and a control system in
which a majority could outvote
the United States. Washington has
so far refused to go along with
either.

Place of Sex

DR. JOHN O'SULLIVAN
DR. GENA ROSE PAHUCKI

Generative Organs,

Functions

Wednesday, March 13, 8:00 p.m.
"BIRTH CONTROL: MORAL AND IMMORAL"
Sexual Abstinence
Ovulatory Rhythm
Contraception
Msgr. John F. Bradley
Sunday, March 17, 7:30 p.m.
"PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF MARRIAGE" (Continued)
Pregnancy and Childbirth
Medical Problems
Dr. John O'Sullivan-Dr. Gena Rose Pahucki

in Marital Life

Wednesday, March 20, 8:00 p.m.
"PSYCHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS IN MARRIAGE"
Feminine-Masculine Differences
Role of Husband and Wife
Financial Problems
Mr. Peter Dwyder, M.S.W.-Catholic Social Services
Sunday, March 24, 7:30 p.m.
"THE CHRISTIAN HOME"
Parent-Child Relationship
Prayer, education, and religious instruction in the home
Work and recreation in the home
Mr. and Mrs. Leo F. McNamara

Soviet Chief
Hits at Writers
MOSCOW QIP)-Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev told rebellious So-
viet artists and writers yesterday
they should stick to the party line
of Socialist realism and use their
work to build Communism.
Winding up a closed-door, two-
day meeting in the Kremlin, the
Soviet premier stated the official
stand against Western trends in
Soviet letters and music and
against abstract painting.
Many Soviet writers and artists,
notably the young ones coming to
the fore, have been demanding
more freedom of expression.
Party Guidance
Although Khrushchev's speech
was not made public, a summary
of the meeting by the official Tass
News Agency said he called upon
the intellectuals to adhere to tra-
ditional party guidance. It ap-
peared they agreed, however re-
luctantly.
Other speakers were mostly old
guard writers of the Socialism
realism school.
The _Tass account said Khrush-
chev explained the tasks "in devel-
oping literature and art of Social-
ist realism in conditions of full-
scale construction of a Commu-
nist society." A frank exchange of
views was reported.
Complete Unity
Tass said the meeting "revealed
complete unity of intellectuals
working in creative fields, its co-
hesion around the Leninist Party,
and the readiness of writers and
artists to take an active part by
their creative work in realizing the
magnificent program of the con-
struction of Communism."

ed they could lure voters from the
Tory cause and "put the Socialists
in."
Liberals now have only six
representatives'in the 625-mem-
ber House of Commons. But they
have scored big gains in special
elections, mainly at the expense
of the Tories.
Balance of Power
Macmillan recalled that the
Liberals held the balance of power
in the 1923 and 1929 elections-
and sided with Labor both times.
He said he expects they will do the
same again.
By law, the prime minister must
call an election no later than Oc-
tober 1964, but he may do so ear-'
lier. With that in mind, aides re-
ported he is considering several
important changes in the govern-
ment and the Conservative party
machines. A switch in the upper
echelons of the foreign office ap-
peared sure. At least two major
shifts were said to be in the cards:
1) The chairman of the Con-
servative party-who virtually
manages the election campaign-
reportedly has asked to be moved.
He is Iain Macleod, who also is
leader of the House of Commons.
Lord Privy Seal
2) The lord privy seal, Edward
Heath, who serves as deputy for-
eign minister, is due for promo-
tion. Heath led Britain's team in
the negotiations for membership
of the Common Market. Despite
failure of the talks because of the
French veto he has been warmly
praised by Macmillan and others,
and seems destined for a bigger
job.
Among the Tory leaders who
have been mentioned as possible
successors to Macleod are Heath
himself, Foreign Secretary Lord
Home and Selwyn Lloyd who was
fired only last July as chancellor
of the Exchequer.

SUNDAY 7:30 P.M. ... of the

GABRIEL RICHARD CENTER ... 331 Thompson Street

EVERYONE IS INVITED

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ST. ANDREWS
EPISCOPAL

CHURCH and the
STUDENT

FOUNDATION

306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY--
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.

11

TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holyt

Communion.
Communion.
Communion.

THE CHURCH

OF CHRIST

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
OXFORD-Army troops began moving from the University of
Mississippi campus and the Oxford National Guard Armory yester-
day to a site just south of the campus on federal land. The troops
have remained at Oxford since the rioting that followed admission of
James H. Meredith, a Negro, to the university last fall.
BUENOS AIRES-Newspapers reported yesterday a climate for
a pre-election coup is building up in Argentina. An Army intelligence
officer was reported under arrest in connection with a subversive plot.
BATON ROUGE-The United States ambassador to the Organiza-I
tion of American States, DeLesseps Morrison, said yesterday Fidel Cas-
tro's image in Latin America "has taken a real nose dive since last
October."

I'

John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
SUNDAY-9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Ser-
vices.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
7:00 p.m. "Japan Today and Problems Con-
cerning All Christians" - Miss Marjorie
Miller and Dr. Ted Uyeno.
WEDNESDAY-7:15 a.m. Matins.
7:15 p.m. Lenten Vespers.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
S e r m o n by Pastor Scheips, "Creedal
Ecumenicity in Christ."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper-Pro-
gram. Reception of New Members.
Wednesday at 7:00 and at 10:00 PM.: Mid-
week Lenten Vespers, with sermon by the
pastor, "Go to Dark Gethsemane." (Holy
Communion)
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Open House for new stu-
dents at Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Tuesday, 12:00 noon-Luncheon and Discus-
sion.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenow at Berkshire
Erwin A. Goede, minister
Services and Church School-9:30 and 11:00
a.m. Greek Tragedy - If. "Man Against
God."
7:30 p.m.-U-M Student Group. "Religion
and the Supreme Court," Richard C. Allen,
speaker.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8.6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Worship.
"Toward Understanding God: God Is Divine
Saviour," sermon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM), 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminara "Christianity and Com-
nunism." Topis: "Religious Socialism" by
Buber and Tillich.
5:30 p.m.-Student Cabinet, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-"Short Term Missions." Speaker,
Jean Robe.
MONDAY
8:00 to 11:00 p.m. - Open House, Jean
Robe's apartment.
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m.--Class in "Christian Courtship and
Marriage" and Class: "The Church in
Theology, Sociology, and Phrophesy."
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.--Holy Communion, Chapel, Fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room.
4:00 p.m.-Wesley Fellowship Coffee Hour,
Lounge.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m. - Grad Supper. "Poverty in the
United States," speaker, Dr. Philip Booth.
FRIDAY THRU SUNDAY
Retreat at Drake House. Students will leave the
Wesley Lounge at 7:00 p.m. Friday and
return by 2 p.m. Sunday. Speaker, Mr.
Myron Bloy. Topic: "Style of Christian
Life." Over-all cost each $5.00.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Discussion, "Christian Ethics and
and Practical Politics."
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, Worship and Discussion. "The Epis-
copal Church," Rev, Robert Hauert, guest.
MONDAY
12:00 noon-Lunch and Discussion.

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MICHIGAN UNION
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Donald Postema, Minister
Woshtenaw at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST

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11

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