100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 09, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.&'WTT~flAV MAIDf VX a thaaft, .BL.j3,AI.

Y , 1V1AKlitl 8, 1863

3

DESPOTISM, HUMANISM:
DeBary Sees Chinese Return to East

i

Lednicki Discusses
Tolsto Conflicts

By ROBERT SELWA
The despotism of China is
nothing new, Prof. W. Theodore
deBary of Columbia University
said yesterday, but the renewed
interest of Chinese intellectuals
in Confucius is a hopeful sign.
Prof. deBary, a member of the
board of directors of the Associa-
tion for Asian Studies and the
editor of a three volume series on
Oriental civilizations, compared
the Communist regime in China
today with the Ming dynasty of
the 17th century.
He listed similarities: a mono-
lithic state ruled by one man, one
party; the absence of constitu-
tional or representative govern-
iment and of a countervailing
power; no geniune rule of law be-
cause law is regarded as an in-
strument of state policy; and iso-
lationism.
Reaction
The strong reactionary tenden-
cies in China today represent a
return not only to the despotism
of the past but also to the study
of Confucius, one of the most im-
portant formative influences in
Chinese history, he said.
The Ming dynasty was expertly
analyzed by Huang Tsung-hsi, a
rebel rho retired from guerrilla
warfare to philosophize, according
to Prof. deBary.
He said Huang pointed out the
ruling group's preoccupation with
self-sustainance rather than with
the welfare of the country. The
Ming dynasty feared external in-
Students Hold
Pro gramniin
onsItatiols
A conference today on Interna-
tional Student Programming to
consider the "overlapping and
sometimes ineffective programs
for foreign students at the Uni-
versity" was announced by the
conference chairman, Howard Ab-
rams, '63.
Sponsored jointly by the United
States National Student Associa-
tion and the International Stu-
dent Association, the conference
will start with registration at the
Union at 9:30 a.m., followed by
a keynote address at 10 p.m., and
four workshops at 11 a.m.
The workshops will consider
the strengths and weaknesses of
current programs for foreign stu-
dents, the problem of cross-cul-
tural education, contact between
American and international ctu-
dents and institutional individual
involvement.
The afternoon session will be
geared to formulating proposals
for new campus programs and
suggestions f o r coordination
among groups currently conduct-
ing international student pro-
grams.
SNCCChairman
Cancels Speech
Charles McDew, chairman of
the Student Nonviolent Coordinat-
ing Committee, wil not be speaking
here as had been planned. He was
scheduled to lecture at the Friends'
Center tonight.

volvements that could undermine
the security of the state.
Involvement
Today Mao Tse-Tung seems on
the surface to be pursuing a policy
of external involvement. But act-
ually, Prof. deBary said, Mao fears
the relaxation of tension much
more than any external threats.
"Mao finds that a war psychosis
without any great risk to himself
is essential to keeping internal
discipline and control," Prof. de-
Bary said.
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev
and Prime Minister Jawahawal
Nehru are more valuable as ene-
mies than as friends. It is more
useful to Mao to have them 8s

sharing power, maintaining the
schools as organs of free discus-
sions, establishing political and
intellectual pluralism, and adopt-
ing rule by law.
Today China has a new glim-
mer of the humanism of Confu-
cius, Prof. deBary went on. Dis-
cussion still takes place in a
Marxist context, but there is in-
creasing open difference of opin-
ion about the philosophy of Con-
fucius.
"In China today the revival in-
cludes a genuine, debate about
Confucius, with conflicting points
of view strongly held and vigor-
ously argued. The road back into
their past," he emphasized, "may
not be a wholly retrogressive road,
but may bring the Chinese to
a better understanding of them-
selves and possibly the West."
Prof. deBary added, however,
that this revival of Confucian
philosophy "may represent old
wine in a new bottle rather than
new wine in an old bottle."

By BURTON MICHAELS
Leo Tolstoy's changing attitudes
toward Poland correspond to his
development as an artist and a
thinker, and "reveal the depth and.
British Offer
'Special Study
The Universities of Birmingham,
London, Oxford and Scotland are
now accepting applications for
summer study in Edinburgh, Ox-
ford and Stratford-upon-Avon.
All perspective applicants
must have completed two years of
university study. Preference is
given to graduate students. Addi-
tional information and applica-
tion forms are available from Prof.
Clark Hopkins, 2011 A.H. The
application deadline is March 31.

'extent of his crisis and
realization," Prof. Waclaw
nicki of the University of
fornia said Thursday.

self-
Led-
Cali-

Junior Panhel To Evaluate
This' Year's Rush System

Tolstoy developed "from typical
Russian, anti-Polish belligerence
to respect and even understand-
ing," Lednicki said. As a child
Tolstoy held a "traditional view,"
toward Poland with the usual dis-
dain, which he acquired as a
student and soldier.
In the Polish insurrection of
1863, Tolstoy was "conventionally
nationalistic." Two years later he
felt it an "indefferent matter that
the Poles were being oppressed."
Into "War and Peace" he inserted
a Polish buffoon for no reason
but criticism of Poland.
But after completing "War and
Peace" and "Anna Karenina,' Tol-
stoy underwent his "spiritual
crisis," Prof. Lednicki said. His
biography shows him actually de-
fending Poles. In "Resurection"
he ranks Poles among the top
political prisoners.; He used his
usual device of juxtaposition to
show a Pole "dying with quiet
nobility," in contrast to the "wo-
manly hysteria" of another who
died with the Pole. He even
changed the Russian in a tree case
of persecution to a Pole.
Although atoning for "even this
small sin of anti-Polishness," Tol-
stoy's crisis thus far had brought
him only to an "interest in his
own soul, to a cold abstraction and
a rationalism which degraded his
soul,"Prof. -Lednicki aid.
As a rationalist Tolstoy criti-
cized Polish patriotism as "in-
compatible with Christianity" and
as "egoistic." He urged Polish pa-
triots to "recognize the love prin-
ciple of non-resistance."
But Tolstoy developed "from
bloodless rationalizing to the in-
tuitive insight of the artist," Prof.
Lednicki said. His, short story,
"But Why" of 1906 is a "tribute
to Polish patriotism." His "hu-
manistic intuition" was such that
he altered what he thought were
the facts of a true story of Polish
prisoners in Siberia to what the
facts really were, Prof. Lednicki
concluded.

G&S Group
To Premier
'Toledo War'
In conjunction with the Creative
Arts Festival, the Gilbert and
Sullivan Society will present "The
Toledo War, or The Michigander's
Bride," a short opera in the Gil-
bert and Sullivan-Menotti vein,
at 8 p.m., Tuesday, in the Michi-
gan Union Ballroom.
The public will be admitted free
to the premier concert perform-
ance of the original work by David
Breckman and Edward Eager.
Directed by Gershom Clark
Morningstar, "Toledo. War" is a
semi-fictional account of the 1835
conflict between Ohio and Mich-
igan over the Toledo Strip, an
eight-mile wide piece of land
stretching from Lake Erie to the
Indiana border.
Composer Brockman and lyrac-
ist Eager have interwoven some of
the real figures of the era into a
tale of "war" and romance which
treads lightly the thin line between
fact and fiction.
Seen in the production will be
Paul Vanderkoy, Grad, as Judge
Phineas Fustian; Judith Riecker
as Permilia, the judge's wife;
Diane Kae Magaw, '65SM, as the
daughter, Annabell; Sue Morris,
Grad, as Isabel, Fustian's niece;
and Richard Hazzard, '63SM, as
Ralph Baxter, the Michigander.
The society will present "The
Gondoliers" as their regular spring
production May 2-4, and has ten-
tative plans to present "Toledo
War" and Burand and Sullivan's
"Cox and Box" in late April.
'U' Foresters
To Celebrate
At Bunyan Ball
The Forester's Club will hold
its annual Paul Bunyan Ball, 8
p.m. tonight in the Michigan Un-
ion Ballroom.
Tickets will be available at the
door at $2.25 per couple.
Music will be provided by Ray,
Lewis and his orchestra from 9-10
and 11-12 p.m. From 8-9 p.m.
there will be square dancing with
Ivan Parker doing the calling.

C; -Mfflmm

!pqm"!9m

CONTI NUOUS
TODAY
FROM 1 O'CLOCK
"A WINNER!"
WORK!8"

I

i

COMING
"LOVERS OF TU REL"

DIAL
5-6290

C9UMBI IC HIGe~ns ANJRYBELR ROCI

Shows at
1, 3, 5,
7, 9 P.M.

COL.UMIsAPICTURES presents A JERRY BRESIER PRODUCTON1
CHARLTON YVETTE
HESTON Mi JAuE
GEORGE FRNE JAMES
CHAKi RIS N uYEN DARE

PROF. W. THEODORE DE BARY
Chinese culture
devils than as comrades, he said.
Mao's regime, Prof. deBary not-
ed, is cutting down on the already
limited number of consulates. "It
,is returning to what for the
Chinese is normalcy. The Manchu
dynasty. confined all foreign con-
tacts to one 'port where they could
be watched and controlled."
Huang Tsung-hsi
Huang Tsung-hsi not only an-
alyzed the despotic characteris-
tics of the rulers but also pro-
posed alternatives, Prof. deBary
noted. These proposals included
Urgfe Removal
Of Ex-Officios
The Committee for a Demo-
cratic Student Government met.
Wednesday to adopt a statement
urging that ex-officios be removed
from Student Government Coun-
cil. /
The committee formed especial-
ly for the campaign to remove ex-
officios from Council is urging an
affirmative vote on the resolution
on Wednesday's ballot.
In the statement adopted by
Committee Chairman Kenneth
Miller, '64, and Vice-Chairman
Mal Warwick, '63, the organiza-
tion cited the "undemocratic
nature of ex-officio representa-
tion."
The statement also noted that
some student groups are afforded
"double or even triple suffrage."
Other groups, such as graduate
students, are "virtually excluded
from representation on Council,"
it proported.
It was also noted that ex-offi-
cios do not have enough time to
devote to Council aside from their
other duties.

By MARY LOU BUTCHER
"The immediate activity for
Junior Panhellenic Association
will be rush evaluation," newly-
elected Junior Panhel President
S a n d r a Rosenberg, '66, said
Thursday.
"The evaluation is conducted
by the executive vice-president of
Junior Panhel, the Panhellenic
rushing chairmen, rushing coun-
selors and the new pledges. To-
gether they present the problems
that this year's rush involved to
Senior Panhel.
"We will also be presenting the
possibility of fall rush for anyone
who has been at the University
a semester," she noted.
Conduct Study
"In the study, we will =question
independent women who rushed
and did not pledge or who drop-
ped rush," Miss Rosenberg said..
"One of the things that we are
going to try to develop this year
is a closer relationship between
the sororities and the independ-
ent women," she said. "We would
like to have an open forum once
a month at which time various
speakers from student organiza-
tions on campus would speak to
the pledges and the independent
women. The independents would
be the guests of the pledges."
Miss Rosenberg noted that one
of Junior Panhel's major projects
is "Help Week." "Various pledges
go to the University Fresh Air
Camp and volunteer their time
and services. We are working
with J u n i o r Inter-Fraternity
Council on this project;" she
noted.
"We would also like to imple-
ment the international sister pro-

gram this y e a r," she said.
"Through this program a sorority
sponsors a girl from another
country who lives in the house
for a year. .
"Last year's Junior Panhel
made a study of this program.
Since it takes about a year and
a half to prepare a sorority for
sponsoring a girl, we will just be
informing this year," Miss Rosen-
berg pointed out.
The other new Junior Panhel-
lenic officers are: Executive Vice-
President: Laura Fitch, '66, Gam-
ma Phi Beta; Administrative
Vice-President: Mary Lou Hines,
'65, Collegiate Sorosis; Secretary:
Joy Greenleaf, '65, Sigma Delta
Tau; Treasurer: Dee Clark, '66,
Delta Delta Delta; Public Rela-
tions Chairman: Judy Rote, '66,
Alpha Chi Omega.
Miss Rosenberg has pledged
Gamma Phi Beta.

11

""^" l'ANAVI
AUNE MACMAON/fLZABETH ALLEN.sC y MARUERITE ROBERTS NV
. uwaw,*l PETER SiW. Fr COMJERRYNBUSLER."iOed by GUY GREEN
COMIN
"FREUD"

.Four Ann Arbor Men Named
As Possible Court Candidates
Four Ann Arbor men have been
named as possible candidates for George Romney later this month.
Washtenaw County's second cir- Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
cult court judgeship. Arbor) and Sen. Stanley G. Thay-
They are City Attorney Jacob er (R-Ann Arbor) are pressing
F. Fahrner Jr., County Prosecutor for passage of this bill before the
William F. Ager Jr., Attorney new constitution takes effect.
Ralph C. Keyes and Attorney Jack The appointee who will be
S. Dugeroff. named by Romney as soon as the
The bill to establish this post bill is passed will probably begin
has already passed the House of his duties immediately. The judge
Representatives and is on its way would serve until 1965, with an
through the Senate. It is expected election for his seat to be held in
that it will be referred to Gov. November of 1964.

}DAILY OFFICIAL, BUL LETIN
.&... . r:.....S...S~~rS...~t.A A~r.
:"t-::." ? . ...i: R"o" " "::9 .;... ' . :!, {.. .. R,. ma .S4. t.G' . . t:1:: f"l" . yf,":?r .; . SS.":.::.

HELD OVER--THRU WEDNESDAY
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS! including
BEST ACTOR * BEST ACTRESS * BEST SHOW
From the,
days of wine
F1 and roses

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for Which the
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
SATURDAY, MARCH 9
,Day Calendar
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Jean Gabin and Pierre Fresnay in Jean
Renoir's "Grand Illusion"; short, Wee-
gee's New York": Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Univ. Play-
ers, School of Music Opera Dept., and
Dept. of Physical Education for Women
Dance Area Opera-Albert Lortzing's

"The Hunters" (Der Wildschutz): Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Baha'i Student Group, Worship serv-
ices and study classes, March 10, 17, 24,
& 31; April 7, 14, 21, & 28; May 5, 12,
26; June 2, 11:00 a.m., League Chapel.
Cultural Affairs Comm. of Union,
Speech by Norman Mailer, March 25,
8:00 p.m., Trueblood Aud.
Cultural Affairs Comm. of Union,
MSU vs. U-M in Debate, March 24, 3:00
p.m. 'Union Conference Room, 3rd
floor.
College of Architecture and Design:
Freshman Five-Week progress reports
(all grades) are to be sent to Rm. 207
Architecture (Dean's Office) before 5:00
p.m., Tues., March 12.
Fellowship Applications for the Mar-
garet Kraus Ramsdell Award are now
available. This fellowship is used to as-
sist students who will have received -a
University of Michigan degree by be-
ginning of tenure to pursue graduate
studies in this country or abroad in
religious education or in preparation

I

Due to unforeseen
circumstances
CHARLES McDEW
will not be able to speak
at the Friend Center

L

1a ,ii

I

Ii

finally comes
a night
like this...

I

I

CINEMA GUILD p.ejeft
Tonight and Tomorrow at 7 and 9
JEAN RENOIR'S
CLASSIC FRENCH DRAMA
LA GRANDE ILLUSION

I

JEAN GABIN

PIERRE FRESNAY

NUMBER FIVE OF THE
TWELVE BEST FILMS OF ALL TIME
Brussels' International Film Critics Poll

r 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan