100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DAY, MARCH 1,1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAf I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY A flW £ ~ a

rsuc 1

ian Planes Reported
Flying Over U.S. Carriers
- - - ----- -----

PROSPECTS HOPEFUL:
Kennedy Sets Forth
New Civil Rights Plan
WASHINGTON (M)-President John F. Kennedy asked Congress
yesterday for unprecedented powers to safeguard Negro voting rights,
including referees named to rule on voter qualifications as soon as
a registrar's impartiality is challenged in federal court.
Other federal action, no matter how speedy and how drastic,
Kennedy said, can never correct abuses of local and state power
to curtail Negro civil rights. The President, spelling out his first

-AP Wirephoto
SOVIET BOMBER-The Defense Department released this picture in Washington of what was
identified as a Soviet twin-jet Badget bomber photographed in late January by a U.S. Navy plane
from the carrier Kitty Hawk.
MOSCOW-PEKING QUARREL:
China Hits Russia with Cowardice'

TOYK O (')-Red China charged
scornfully today that Soviet Pre-
mier Nikita S. Khrushchev's fol-
lowers are "cowardly as mice."
The Chinese dared the Russians
to be men enough to lay the Mos-
cow-Peking quarrel before the
court of world Communist opinion.
In a heavy new propaganda
barrage at the Kremlin, Peking
accused Moscow of cracking the
whip over world Communist lead-
ers. It said the anti-Chinese Com-
munist countries used powerful
stations to ja Peking broadcasts
to prevent people from hearing
Mao Tse-Tung's side of the argu-
ment.
The violent attack broadcast by

the New China News Agency re-
jected any servant-to-master rela-
tionship for Red China and the
Soviet party. NCNA, quoting a
long article in Red Flag, theoreti-
cal journal of the Chinese Party,
recalled that Peking had publisned
statements giving the views of
Khrushchey, Pravda and the So-
viet premier's European support-
ers.
Khrushchev's Followers
But of the Khrushchev follow-
ers, it said:
"Cowardly as mice, they are
scared to death. They dare not let
the people of their own countries
see our articles for themselves and

have endeavored to impose a
water-tight embargo. They are
even using a powerful station to
jam our broadcasts to prevent
people from listening."
This was the second belligerent
article to appear in Peking this
week, clearly indicating the split
between Moscow and Peking is
deepening, despite Kremlin at-
tempts to soft-pedal the dispute.
The Whole Thing
Peking accused Moscow of pro-
voking the whole thing and then
refusing to tell the Chinese side.
"Friends, comrades, if you are
men enough, step forward, let each
side in the debate publish all the
articles in which it is criticized by
the other side, and let the people
in our own countries and the
whole world figure out and judge
who is right and who is wrong,"
challenged Peking's Red Flag.
"That is what we are doing. And
we hope you will follow our ex-
ample. We are not afraid to pub-
lish everything of yours in full. We
publish all the masterpieces in
which you rail at us. Then, in
reply, we either answer them point
by point, or we answer the main
points.

McNamnara,
S 0ays Flights
'Not Hostile'
Report No Penetration
Of North America
WASHINGTON (AW) - Soviet
long-range reconnaissance planes
have been flying over United
States aircraft carriers in the At-
lantic and North Pacific during
the past four weeks, Secretary of
Defense Robert S. McNamara said
yesterday.
The latest look-see was made
over the supercarrier Forrestal last
Friday southeast of the Azores,
McNamara told a news conference.
But he said in none of the in-
stances did the Russian planes
show any hostile intent.
In the case of the planes which
flew over the Forrestal-two four-
engine planes two hours or so
apart-they were trailed by United
States interceptor planes on their
approach to the carrier, and on
the trip home.
, Defense Chief
The defense chief was asked if
any of the reconnaissance craft
had operated over the North
American continent. He replied
with a flat "No!"
McNamara said flights over
naval craft by short-range and
medium range Russian planes are
not unusual but that overflights
by long-range planes are new.
He acknowledged that "we per-
iodically overfly Soviet vessels,"
describing the practice as a "per-
fectly legal operation over inter-
national waters."
Wouldn't Be Hard
Navy spokesmen said it would
not be difficult for the Russian
planes to find the carriers.
Asked why he waited this long
to announce the flights, McNa-
mara said the information came
in slowly and it was decided to
wait.
"The Soviet aircraft apparently
flew from bases in the USSR in
two flights of two aircraft each.
Over Twice
The first two passed over the
carrier task force at 9:08 a.m.,
one remaining at about 30,000
feet "while the second one came
in underneath the 2,000-foot over-
cast and overflew the Forrestal
twice," McNamara said.
In the case of the Forrestal, he
said, the Navy had announced
when that carrier would leave the
Mediterranean after being replac-
ed there by the carrier Enterprise.
Incidents in the North Pacific,
the Navy said, occurred at points
near the known Soviet air bases
on Kamchatka Peninsula.

Civil Rights program to Congress,<
added:
To Free Forces
"It is necessary instead to free
the forces of our democratic sys-
tem within these areas by prompt-
ly insuring the franchise to all
citizens, making it possible for
their elected officials to be truly
responsible to all their consti-
tuents."
The President also called for
federal help in ending school seg-
regation and requested a four-
year extension of the Civil Rights
Commission with expanded duties.
"The program outlined in this
message should not provide the
occasion for sectional bitterness,"
Kennedy said. "No state or section
of this nation can pretend a self-
righteous-role, for every area has
its own Civil Rights problems."
Civil Rights advocates in Con-
gress generally hailed the program
as a step in the right direction.
Many said it didn't go far enough.
To End Filibuster
The defeat of an effort to make
it easier to end filibusters in the
Senate will make passage, of Civil
Rights bills more difficult, a num-
ber of Civil Rights supporters said.
Typical of Southern reaction was
that of. Sen. A. Willis Robertson
(D-Va) who said:
"As far as Virginia is concerned,
we can get along very well with-
out any of that new legislation."
White House officials acknow-
ledged to reporters there is a good
chance a Southern filibuster might
result when the program comes
up for Senate action.
They insisted, however, thatthe
proposals are realistic and have a
good chance of being enacted.
The legislative requests are ex-
pected to be submitted within 10
days or so as three separate bills.
Kennedy said slavery has van-
ished in the century since the
Emancipation Proclamation, but
"progress for the Negro has been
too often blocked and delayed."
He said, "Equality before the
law has not always meant equal
treatment and opportunity."
GOP Leaders
Hit Programs
WASHINGTON (MP - Congres-
sional Republican leaders de-
nounced the Kennedy administra-
tion's fiscal plans yesterday as
"dangerously wrong" and said
United States prestige is being
risked with concessions to Russia
in the nuclear test-ban talks.
Rep. Charles A. Halleck of In-
diana, House GOP leader, said
President John F. Kennedy's new
budget could be cut upwards of
$10 billion without endangering
national security or the economy.

Urges Action
By Congress
NEWARK ()-Atty. Gen. Rob-
ert F. Kennedy urged Congress
yesterday to enact legislation deal-
ing with literacy tests as a voting
qualification in order to provide
the franchise for "hundreds of
thousands" of Negroes.
President John F. Kennedy pro-
posed such legislation today in a
special civil rights message to
Congress.
"The executive branch is doing
all it can," he told a news con-
ference in the office of United
States Atty. David M. Satz Jr.
"Now it's up to the legislature
and we hope they do something
about it."
He said the government bas no
objection to an "objective" test,
given "across the board" to both
Negro and white prospective vot-
ers.
He said there are counties in the
South in which Negroes outnum-
ber whites but none are eligible
to vote in a national election. In
the same counties, he said, whites
who have reached. only second
grade can vote.
Yesterday's short meeting with
Satz was one of about 3O the
attorney general has held witn
United States attorneys in other
parts of the nation. He said the
purpose was to check on progress
in routine cases by the attorneys,
the FBI, the Bureau of Narcotics
and other Federal law enforce-
ment agencies.
Other topics Kennedy touched
on included wire-tapping. He
said that although the legislation
he supports would include "new
weapons" -for the FBI, it actually
restricts the Department of Jus-
tice in such matters

THE RAVEN
GALLERY of FINE ARi
:\ presents
I Miss JO MAPES,
! v > of the VAUGHN MEADER
!
"First Family" troupe ... opening
U
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27th for
TWO WEEKS ONLY
"Queen of Folksong"--L.A. Examiner
Reservations Suggested-UN 4-9907
!
THE RAVEN GALLERY-James Couzens at Outer Drive
Anouncing
SPRING'
WEEKEND
CAN-CAN GIRLS
SUE BROCKWAY-CHI OMEGA
BONNIE BUCHANAN-CHI OMEGA
1 JOAN GOLDBERG-ALHPA EPSILON PHI
JUDY HAMMERMAN-DELTA PHI EPSILON
DIANE HAY-ALPHA GAMMA DELTA
STEPHANIE JOHNSON-PI BETA PHI
FRAN LASSER-SIGMA DELTA TAU
VICKI LASSER-DELTA PHI EPSILON
MARTY HAMMER-,PI BETA PHI
TERRY MARKOFF-SIGMA DELTA TAU
JILL MEYERS-DELTA PHI EPSILON
WENDY PADDISON-CHI OMEGA
JANE POLLAK-SIGMA DELTA TAU
LINDA SAUNDERS-PHI MU
LESLIE SINGER-BUTLER, MARKLEY
THERE WILL BE A MEETING
OF THE CAN-CAN GIRLS
THURSDAY, MARCH 7, AT 4 P.M.
IN THE SPRING WEEKEND OFFICE

a''

T

Red Chinese Rebuff Efforts,
To Mend Communist Camp
By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER
Associated Press Analyst
WASHINGTON-Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev has suf-
fered a sharp rebuff in his efforts to patch up his quarrel with the
Chinese Communists.
But officials studying the latest flood of words from Moscow
and Peking are unwilling toyconclude that a reconciliation has now
become impossible. ;
What is evident at the moment is that the recent show of
friendly gestures in the two big Communist capitals has been over-
run by the bitter compilation of charges against Soviet' leaders,
including Khrushchev. They =range from accusations of "double
dealing" to complaints of betrayal of basic Communist - doctrine,
topped off with a demand for an apology for alleged past mistakes.
Angry Tones
By contrast with the angry tone and bitter content of the Chinese
Communist statement published in the Peking Peoples Daily, Khrush-
chev in his Moscow speech Wednesday stuck to the call for unity
among the world's Communist parties, a position he emphasized at
a January meeting of Communist groups in East Berlin.
American leaders are watching the development of the dispute
closely at this critical and perhaps climactic stage because of its
potential impact on Soviet policies toward the West.
If the differences are papered over in some manner to restore
Soviet leadership over the whole Communist world, including Red
China, for at least a temporary period, then it is assumed here
Khrushchev might feel more confident in pursuing a more belligerent
policy toward the Western allies on such issues as Berlin and dis-
armament.
Open Rupture
If the dispute-continues unabated or leads to an open rupture
in Russian-Red Chinese relations, then Khrushchev may feel com-
pelled to pursue more conciliatory policies toward the Western allies.
A week ago signs began to appear that Soviet and Red Chinese
leaders might be moving toward conciliatory high-level talks. There
were even rumors in diplomatic quarters abroad that the talks would
shortly be held in some relatively neutral place such as Outer
Mongolia.
1 .1

if

world News
Roundup*

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-A Federal Grand
Jury yesterday indicted Olin Ma-
thieson Chemical Corp. and two
other firms on charges of con-
cealing kickbacks of more than
$150,000 on sales of drugs to Viet
Nam and Cambodia. The drugs
were financed by the United States
government under the foreign aid
program.
PARIS-Police reported yester-
day the capture of nine Secret
Army commandos who had orders
to kill Premier Georges Pompidou
after a church service last sum-
mer. They said other high officials
were marked for- death in a plot
never carried out.
DETROIT-In an unpublicized
move, the extreme right-wing
John Birch Society has replaced
Edward A. Kelly, of Roseville, as
its Michigan co-ordinator.
* * *
NEW YORK--Dow-Jones stock
averages closed yesterday with 30
industrials down 7.86, 20 railroads
down 1.44, 15 utilities down 1.18
and 65 stocks down 2.52.

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER presents
JEAN-LEON
DESTINE
and his
HAITIAN DANCE
COMPANY
....one of the finest
dancers of our day...
-Walter Terry
N.Y. Herald Tribune
ANN ARBOR HIGH AUDITORIUM
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 1963 8:30 P.M.
tickets $2.50 and $2.00
available at Bob Marshall's Bookshop
or write D.A.C., P.O. Box 179, Ann Arbor, Mich.

BOX OFFICE TODAY 12:30-5:00

COMIC OPERA NEXT WEEK
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPT. of SPEECH
present
OPERA DEPT., SCHOOL OF MUSIC in
THE

"" r
r
f

fresh from Lake Michigan...

Hu

TEES A

114

4

i

i

get Lots More from EM

more bo
more flav
in the sm

dy
or
oke

THE MIRACLE TIP
MOP
11 lAf

("Der Wildschutz")
L_ A l n .n r i ^n-r-7 1 tF'

i

l 9-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan