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February 27, 1963 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-27

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUJARY 27, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY a ~

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4

Rusk Threatens Force
If Cuba Employs Arms,
Must Avoid 'Infection'

Ferency Predicts Vote
To Accept Constitution
By GERALD STORCHI
State Democratic Chairman Zolton Ferency last night predicted
the proposed state Constitution will be approved at the polls April 1.
"I doubt very much that it will be rejected," he told the Young
Democrats here last night. The party has trouble "getting its story
told" due to a recalcitrant press and "Romney snow jobs," Ferency
explained. In criticizing the document, he devoted particular attention

HOT SURFACE, COLD CLOUDS:
R Report 'Smog' Covers Venus
By The Associated Press

WASHINGTON-Venus has a temperature of 800 degrees, pre-
cluding the chance of life as earth people know it, the National Aero-
nautics and Space Administration reported yesterday in releasing
more findings of Mariner satellite's probe of the planet.
Reporting on the Dec. 14 pass of the planet, NASA officials
said that the clouds consist of an oily "smog." The scientists also an-
>nounced several other findings
whinh mov h nUjt L va1oU 1±UA±Lr

VOLUNTEER TEACHERS:
Students Boycott School
To Protest Segregation
ENGLEWOOD, N.J. (A)-Nearly half the pupils of the predom-
inantly Negro Lincoln Elementary School did not report for classes
yesterday as their parents prepared for a lengthy boycott to protest
alleged de facto segregation.
Negro leaders said they have enough volunteer teachers and tem-
porary classrooms to continue the boycott indefinitely.
It will not end, said Russell Major of the Englewood Movement.

until authorities actually end
Anti-HUC
Move Fafls
WASHINGTON (A')-The Hou
Committee on Rules yesterd
killed a proposal to abolish t
House Committee on Un-America
Activities as an independent gro
and make it a subcommittee
the House Judiciary Committee.
The vote that tabled the pr
posal was 12-1. The dissenter w
Rep. Richard Bolling (D-Mo). T
members weire absent.
The rules group acted aft
hearing contentions that the pl
to change the status of the cozy
mittee on un-American activiti
was part of "the Communist co
spiracy" and would "give substa
tial aid to our enemies."
Sponsors of the proposal, i:
Ading Reps. James Roosevelt (1
k if) , Leonard Farbstein (D-NY
and John V. Lindsay (R-NY), sa
their motive was to provide for
more effective organization of t
investigation of Communism an
other forms of subversion. A
three introduced identical resole
tions.
Five Ask Passage
Of Youth Corps
WASHINGTON (M)-As an ind
cation of the importance it a
taches to the bill, the Kennedy a
ministration sent five Cabinet o
ficers to Congress yesterday
urge passage of a measure to s
up a youth conservation corps.

racial imbalance in the schools or
"until people are thrown in
jail."'
Roll Call
There were 239 pupils absent out
of an enrollment of 498, when
teachers called the roll in the
school bt:"ing.
Superintendent of schools Mark
se R. Shedd estimated that eight per
ay cent were out for reasons unrelat-
he ed to the boycott.
He told a news conference that
n he boycott should be considered
up 49 per cent effective. A three-day
of boycott of the Lincoln school last
fall was considered to have been
o- 60 per cent effective,
While the pupils climbed into a
chartered bis for a trip to tem-
wo pcrary classrooms, seven pickets
marched in front of the school.
er There was no violence.
an Today's Attendance
n Shedd said he expected more pu-
es pils to attend today, but Major
n- said more Negro parents would be
,n- urged to keep their children out.
Some Negro parents, while sup-
L- porting the aims of the movement,
D- have privately opposed the boycott.
Y)d Shedd said the school board
id would meet in a few days to deter-
he mine what action would be taken.
hd Legally, the parents could be fined
nl under the state's compulsory at-
tendance law. Shedd said the
u- school board would have no juris-
diction if the pupils were to be
permanently enrolled in private
schools.
Past Protests
Negro leaders have protested
here for two years against racial
i.- discrimination in the schools re-
t.. sulting from Negro housing pat-
d- terns.
f- Their complaints are now before
to the state commissioner of educa-
et tion, with hearings scheduled to
begin April 1.

Guatemalan
Head Urges
Red Ouster
Advocates Weapons
If Situation Demands
By The Associated Press
HOMSTON-Secretary of State
Dean Rusk said last night if Cuba
tries to use arms outside its ter-
ritory it "will be met with the
I armed forces of the hemisphere."
Rusk made the statement in a
news conference before addressing
the Texas Daily Newspaper Asso-
ciation.
He also said "a Soviet military
presence on that island cannot be
accepted."
Outside Arms
He said the use of arms by
Cuba outside the island would be
"intercepted, interrupted and stop-
ped."
"Cuba must not become a source
of infection for the hemisphere,"
he said.
Meanwhile, in Washington Gua-
temala urged the American repub-
lics yesterday to unite in cleaning
European and Asian Communists
out of "the unfortunate island of
Cuba"-by force if necessary.
Guatemala's Position
Guatemala's President, Gen.
Manuel Ydigoras Fuentes, express-
ed his country's position in a for-
mal message to the 20-nation Or-
ganization of American States. The
United States and all Latin Amer-
ican republics except Communist
Cuba are active members.
Ydigoras said the self respect
and honor of the OAS states de-
mand a solution to "the frightful
case of Cuba," if need be, "with
bayonets fixed."
Rusk continued, the United
States and its hemisphere allies
have previously declared their op-
position to the export of arms and
subversion by the Red. Castro re-
gime and United States naval pa-
trols operate in the Caribbean
area.
As for Russian troops on the is-
land, President John F. Kennedy
has been pressing for their with-
drawal. The White House said So-
viet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev
has promised to pull out several
thousand more soldiers by mid-
March, although no hard evidence
of their departure has been an-
nounced yet.

ZOLTON FERENCY
... sees Democratic defeat

81 DAYS:
Talks Fail;
Paper Strike
To Continue
NEW YORK tP)-An eleventh-
hour effort to settle New York's
81-day newspaper blackout by ne-
gotiations between publishers and
striking printers failed yesterday,
Mayor Robert F. Wagner announc-
ed.
Wagner did not say when he
would present his recommended
settlement for the dispute. He call-
ed for written reports from both
sides today.
The parties met without a me-
diator for over six hours at a
secret location.
"They reported after the lengthy
session that they were no further
toward any agreement than they
were when they left here over 10
days ago," Wagner said.
Wagner, who fell heir to the
third-party role President John F.
Kennedy suggested for "independ-
ent determination" of the stale-
mate, said Saturday that if media-
tion failed, he would set forth a
proposal. It would not be binding.
After announcing the failure of
yesterday's talks, Wagner skirted
questions about his next move,
saying "when I receive those writ-
ten reports, I will announce the
next step I will take."
When Kennedy recommended
that a third party present a settle-
ment proposal, he named no one
for the umpire's role. The New
York Newspaper Guild suggested
Wagner for the job.

"to its "very hashed up" education
section, blasting one provision to
earmark half of sales tax revenues
for universities, high schools and
grammar schools.
Never Enough
Previously, only local districts
had been included, and even with
this more limited outlet, "ear-
marking had never provided
enough money," Ferency said.
On other issues, the state chair-
man vehemently denied charges
that the party and he himself are
labor-dominated.
He cited the opposition of state
AFL-CIO President August Scholle
to his candidacy for the chair-
manship, anddalso his failure to
gain AFL-CIO support when he
ran for Detroit prosecutor two
years ago.
Unions Unsuccessful
"Labor has failed miserably on
attaining its bread-and-butter is-*
sues," such as adequate workmen's
compensation and minimum wage
laws, Ferency added.
Most important, at the Demo-
crats' recent state convention,
"there wasn't a caucus there that
had more than one third labor
representatives," he said. In fact,
his struggle with Joe Collins for
the chairmanship "was the first
open, honest, fair contest we've
(the party) had in many years."
Conceding that several union-
dominated Wayne County dis-
tricts at the convention voted by
unit rule, Ferency declared he's
"personally against unit rule" and
promised to recommend its ibo-
lition to the state central commit
tee.
The move will be part of his
efforts to "open up" the party, to
broaden its base and remove its
"labor-dominated" image.
Accuse Soviets
'Of Pressure
Agcainst Peking
TOKYO (;P)-Communist China
accused the Soviet Union yester-
day of "perfidiously and unilater-
ally" tearing up hundreds of aid
agreements and contracts as part
of a campaign of economic pres-
sure against Peking.
The Chinese made this charge
for the first timne in an unprece-
dentedly bitter attack on Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev.,
The official Peking People's
Daily-shattering speculation that
Moscow and Peking might be mov-
ing toward a reconciliation-ac-
cused Khrushchev of starting the'
quarrel wh~ich now divides world
Communism by condemning Red
China in its border dispute with
India.
..

Fail To Get
A greement
MIAMI BEACH (IP)-The AFL-
CIO Executive Council concluded
a 10-day winter meeting yesterday
amid some disagreement among
top leaders over the type of shorter
work week they want from Con-
gress.
The union chiefs are more con-
vinced than ever, they said in a se-
ries of policy statements, that a
cut in the present 40-hour week
is needed to share available jobs
and restore purchasing power to
spur the economy.
For months, the AFL-CIO lead-
ers have called for a legislated 35-
hour week with a 40-hour pay
and with heavier overtime penal-
ties to curb unemployment and
provide jobs for the expanding
work force.
New Plan
Walter Reuther, head of the
auto workers union, told news-
men, however, he has some misgiv-
ings whether marginal firms and
industries could stand a drastic
work hour cut. He suggested some
might be forced out of business,
thereby increasing unemployment.
Reuther plugged, instead, for a
plan to adjust the length of the
work week up or down, according
to changing economic conditions.
The 40-hour week would continue
as the standard. But when unem-
ployment increased to specified
levels, weekly work hours would be
cut automatically. Full 40-hour
pay would be maintained out of an
equalization fund financed from
a new payroll tax.
Disagreement
George Meany, AFL-CIO presi-
dent, indicated he still favors the
straight 35-hour week approach.
Asked about Reuther's views,
Meany said, "I'm not prepared to
pass judgment on that until I give
it more study."
Unusual Opportunity
at Reasonable Prices
Detroit Symphony
Orchestra Concert,
Valter Poole. conducting
Jerome Hines, guest artist
Ford Auditorium, Detroit
Mon., March 4, 1963, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets, contact
CHRISTIAN ENTERPRISE
3650 Carpenter Rd.
Prices: $3.00 and $2.00
Call: NOrmandy 8-9629

wicn may upset several standard
theories about Venus:
New Theories
1) There are no breaks in Ve-I
nus's cloud cover, but one spot is
colder than others, indicating a:
hidden configuration on the plan-
let;
2) There is no dense cloud of
electrons high in its atmosphere;
and
3) There is no detectable carbon
dioxide in the atmosphere al-
though there may be some in the
15-mile thick, 45-mile high cloud
cover.
Record Temperature
Commenting on the temperature
findings, Prof. Fred T. Haddock
of the astronomy department said
that the 800 degree reading does
not surprise him, as it did NASA
officials. The reading is close to
radio - astronomy measurements
taken rczently.
The high temperature rules out
any possibility of landing men on
the planet. Manned flights could
be made to Venus, but not on it,
NASA officials said.
The question of water vapor of
Venus remains unanswered, they
added. A microwave radiometer
instrument aboard Mariner - the
same one that figured in the tem-
perature readings-was jammed
by space noise, making the data
unclear.
Further analysis may provide an
answer, NASA officials surmised.
The scientists said that all the
new findings about the planet
were subject to some change on
further analysis, but they indicat-
ed any such changes would not be
of a major nature.

MARINER II
. before flight

PROF. FRED T. HADDOCK
... no surprise

(Author of "I Was a Teen-age Dwarf", "The Many
Loves of Dobie Gillis", etc.)

THE CURSE OF THE CAMPUS: NO. 2
As was pointed out last week, one would think that with all
the progress we have made in the education game, something
might have been done by now about roommates. But no. The
roommate picture has not brightened one bit since Ethan
Goodpimple founded the first American college.
(Contrary to popular belief, Harvard was not the first. Mr.
Goodpimple started his institution some 75 years earlier. And
quite an institution it was, let me tell you! Mr. Goodpimple
built schools of liberal arts, fine arts, dentistry, and tanning.
He built a lacrosse stadium that seated 102,000. Everywhere
on campus was emblazoned the stirring Latin motto GAVE
MUSSI-"Watch out for moose." The student union contained
a bowling alley, a clock, and a 16-chair barber shop.

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By The Associated Press
L O N D ON - Harold Wilson,
Britain's new Labor Party leader,
last night called again for limited
Allied recognition of Communist
East Germany as part of an East-
West Berlin settlement.
BRUSSELS -France urged its
Common Market partners last,
night to avoid making young
African nations pawns in the
trading bloc's quarrels. But Italy
and the Netherlands held up crea-
tion of a $730 million fund badly
wanted by the French to aid the
Africans.
- * * *
WASHINGTON - President
John F. Kennedy's omnibus edu-
cation bill ran head on yesterday
into the issues of race and relig-
ion, which have helped kill pre-
vious education measures. Wit-
nesses at a House Education Sub-
committee hearing opposed fed-
eral support for church-related in-
stitutions or segregated public
schools. They urged adding to the
bill a provision that aid be with-
held from school districts which
have taken no steps toward de-
segregation.
* * *

donesia intends to resume diplo-
matic relations with the Nether-
lands.
NEW YORK-After a day and
a half of decline, New York Stock
Exchange prices met support in
mid-afternoon yesterday with the
result that the list staged an ir-
regular advance. The Dow-Jones
Industrial closed up .67; rails .40,
and utilities .66.

THE STUDENT ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
and B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
invite you to a
KUMSUFZ
(get-together)
Continuing our weekly series of instruction in
"ISRAEL'S DANCES and SONGS"
Refreshments Thursday, Feb. 28 . . . 7:30 P.M.
HILLEL FOUNDATION ... 1429 Hill Street

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01* '{,
(It was this last feature-the barber shop-that, alas,
brought Mr. Goodpimple's college to an early end. The student
body, being drawn from the nearby countryside, was composed
chiefly of Pequots and Iroquois who, alas, had no need of a
barber shop. They braid their hair instead of cutting it, and as
for shaving, they don't. The barber, Tremblatt Follicle by name,
grew so depressed staring all the time at 16 empty chairs that
one day his mind finally gave way. Seizing his vibrator, he ran
outside and shook the entire campus till it crumbled to dust.
This later became known as Pickett's Charge.)
But I digress. We were discussing ways for you and your
roommate to stop hating each other. This is admittedly diffi-
cult but not impossible if you will both bend a bit, give a little.
I remember, for example, my own college days (Berlitz, '08).
My roommate was, I think you will allow, even less agreeable
than most. He was a Tibetan named Ringading whose native
customs, while indisputably colorful, were not entirely endear-
ing. Mark you, I didn't mind so muchthe gong he struck on
the hour or the string of firecrackers he set off on the half-hour.
I didn't even mind his singeing chicken feathers every dusk and
daybreak. What I did mind was that he singed them in my hat.
To be fair, he was not totally taken with some of my habits
either-especially my hobby of collecting water. I had no jars
at the time and just had to stack the water any-old-where.
Well sir, things grew steadily cooler between Ringading and
me, and they might have gotten actually ugly had we not each
happened to receive a package from home one day. Ringadin
opened his package, paused, smiled shyly at me, and offerA
me a gift.
"Thank you," I said. "What is it?"
"Yak butter," he said. "You put it in your hair. In Tibetan
we call it gree see kidstuff."
"Well now, tha's mighty friendly," I said and offered him a
gift from my package. "Now you must have one of mine."
"Thank you," he said. "What is this called?"
"Marlboro Cigarettes," I said and held a match for him.
He puffed. "Wow!" he said. "This sure beats chicken feathers 1"
"Or anything else you could name," I said, lighting my own

ed

UNITED NATIONS-The Unit-
I Nations reported yesterday In-,

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