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February 23, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

aa___________________ - LA/.. R,- - ATUR.

Davis Views
U.S. Culture
Study Plan
By BARBARA PASH
The purpose of the American
culture program is to integrate
departmental courses and present
a general humanistic view of
Americancivilizationand its de-
velopment, Prof. Joe Lee Davis of
the English department and di-
rector of the American culture
program explained recently.
It is considered an interdepart-
mental, area program rather than
a separate department, and is de-
voted to the American cultural
scene. "Many departments offer
courses for credit towards under-
graduate and graduate concentra-
tion in the field," he noted.
Operating on the same basis as
the Near Eastern, Far Eastern and
Russian Studies programs, the
American culture program offers a
wide choice of courses in the poli-
tical science, history, sociology,
English and psychology depart-
ments. These can be selected in
the junior and senior years.
Offers Three Courses
The program itself presents
three American Studies courses:
Images of the American Character
399, Conference in American Cul-
ture 498, and Arts in American
Life 499. These are taught by pro-
fessors from various departments.
"One must approach American
culture from all disciplines because
one department is unable to give
a complete resume of this vast
subject. We must understand our
culture in its totality and therefore
students must acquaint themselves
with the numerous departmental
views," Prof. Davis continued.
The program is arranged so that
the student can select that part of
American culture he wishes to em-
phasize. Two courses are also of-
fered exclusively to foreign stu-
dents: Readings in American Civ-
ilization 401 and Readings in
United States Literature 402. In-
terest has been shown by England
and Japan for the establishment
of American culture programs
abroad.
Little Enthusiasm
The program was instituted in
1932 by Prof. Howard M. Jones
of the English department. Al-
though it was one of the first es-
tablished, few people took the
courses and they were not given
again until 1952.
"After World WarII, American
studies programs began develop-
ing. ; In the early 1950's, we re-
instituted our program. Now there
are about 100 American culture
programs offered in the United
States," he said.
The American Studies Associa-
tion, founded after the war, en-
courages the study of our culture.
Several Degrees
The University's program offers
bachelor of arts, master's and doc-
tor of philosophy degrees. Gradu-
ate work in American culture is
becoming increasingly popular as
a useful background for teaching
and journalism, Prof. Davis ex-
plained.
There are now 14 undergradu-
ates and 24 graduate students in
the American culture program.
"Most of our students take the
program as preparation for foreign
service positions, the Peace Corps,
teaching, journalism or as a look
at it as a general education in the
humanities," he noted.
Since the program makes con-
siderable demands on the student's
adaptability of mind and range of
ideas, Prof. Davis encourages hon-
ors students to elect it. But it
has not yet been made an exclu-
sively honors program.

NON-VIOLENT ACTION:
CORE Opposes Racial Discrimination

Delta Bill Gains in House;
Expect Senate Opposition

V

By DIANE PINE
The Congress of Racial Equality
f i g h t s r a c i a l discrimination
throughout the United States,
through direct, non-violent action.
Formed in 1942, CORE uses five
basic techniques to eliminate ra-
cial discrimination:
1) It investigates the situation
and learns exactly how much dis-
crimination is taking place and
what the nature of the discrimina-
tion is; 2) discusses grievances
with thoseresponsible for the dis-
crimination and tries to bring
about a satisfactory change of
policy; 3) appeals to the public for
support of their action; 4) publi-
cizes the action through picket
lines, leaflets and press releases,
if none of these tactics are suc-
cessful, and 5) employs direct

challenge techniques such as sit-
ins, standng lines, and boycotts.
Throughout the actions, CORE
participants remain peaceful, or-
derly and polite, often submitting
to insults and beatings without re-
taliation, says CORE literature.
Anna Holden, former CORE na-
tional secretary, said CORE's use
of non-violent techniques has been
very successful.
They have integrated many res-
taurants, movie theatres, swim-
ming pools and other public ac-
commodations. Although discrimi-
nation is thought of mainly0 in
connection with the South, this is
far from the truth, Miss Holden
said. In fact, discrimination may
be found here in Ann Arbor and
other parts of Michigan.

U' Class Gift Establishes

Special Puri
By ANDREW ORLIN
The Class Gift of 1917 was es-
tablished in June of 1957 "as an
endowment fund to be used at the
discretion of the dean, acting liter-
ary college dean, Burton D.
Thuma, said recently.
Through a three letter solici-
tation in 1957, more than a hun-
dred alumni of the class of 1917
contributed nearly $8000. As of
Dec. 31, 1962, the "unexpended
income" from this fund amounted
to over $1200 while the principal
amounted to nearly $12,000.
The money from the fund has
been used only once. In Decem-
ber of 1961, Vice-President for
Academic Affairs Roger Heyns,
who was then dean of the literary
college, used the money to send
Prof. Oleg Grabar of the history
of art department to Paris to
photograph an exhibit of Persian
art.
Private Collections
The collection which came from
the Teheran Museum and from
various private collections was for
the first time gathered in one ex-
hibit at that time. The exhibit
afforded leading art experts the
opportunity of checking controver-
sial pieces of art with authentic
pieces from the same time period,
according to Prof. Grabar.
Prof. Grabar had the art photo-
graphed including the controver-
sial half of a document which, if
it is authentic, is the oldest il-
lustrated Persian manuscript. "If
it is not authentic, it is a master-
piece of forgery," Prof, Grabar
added. All the photographs taken
at the exhibit are now part of the
University collection on Persian
art.
The future use of this money is
presently uncertain. "It is rela-
tively rare that an occasion comes
up that an amount of money of
this size can be used," Dean Thu-
ma noted.
Released Time
However, he suggested a num-
ber of ways in which the money
might be used if it was allowed to
accrue. "What I would like to do
is get enough money in there to
give some of the younger members
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

poses Fund
of the faculty released time,'" he
said. Instructors are not allowed
sabbaticals and assistant profes-
sors must wait six years before
they are entitled to them. The
fund could be used to grant these
younger members of the faculty
money to carry on private research.
Thuma also saw the possibility
of helping University museums to
get exhibits which would otherwise
be outside their budgets.
Funds Accumulate
The fund increases sporadically
when donations are sent in. Addi-
tional funds were accumulated in
1959 and 1961 through solicita-
tions, according to Alumni Fund
manager, James K. Miller. A full
scale solicitation was held in 1962
at the forty-fifth reunion of the
class. Miller sees_ another "full
scale solicitation before the class
of 1917, goes into emeritus," in
1967.
Money obtained in this fund is
invested by the University. It is
part of an investment pool with
other endowments which are con-
tributed on a non-restrictive basis.
New Degrees
Exceed Last
Year's Total
The Regents awarded 1,474 de-
grees at mid-year graduation last
month, exceeding last year's total,
including 779 graduate and profes-
sional ones.
Last year at this time 1,402 de-
grees were presented.
The total number of degrees in-
cluded 647 from the graduate
school, 222 from the literary col-
lege, 199 from the engineering
school, 91 from the education
school, and 84 from the business
school.
A NEW SERVICE
at
GOLD BOND CLEANERS
515 E. William
COIN-OP TYPE
CLEANING
BY TH E POU ND
Professional Cleaning
and Spotting, Garments
Returned on Hangers
Ready for Home
Pressing

In the past two years, Ann Ar-
bor CORE uncovered and elimin-
ated several cases of discrmina-
tion.
On July 8, 1961, Ann Arbor
CORE and Detroit CORE initiated
a freedom ride to Dearborn, whose
mayor allegedly ran on a Jim
Crow ticket and who boasts that
Dearborn is the "furthest Northern
city with Southern hospitality."
Twenty-one restaurants and two
bowling alleys were tested.
Change Revealed
Subsequent tests the following{
winter revealed a definite change
in attitude as a result of the ride.
There were no direct refusals to
Negroes and all of the twenty-
one restaurants granted equal
service to Negroes and whites, she
said.
In November 1961, the Ann Ar-
bor Fair Housing Association
(AAAFHA) was formed and CORE
worked with them to end discrimi-
nation in Pittsfield Village, a
housing development outside of
Ann Arbor. Pittsfield has a long
history of discrimination.
Studies Reveal Bias
Test cases were made in Decem-
ber and it was found that the de-
velopment was not open to Ne-
groes. Negotiations with the owner
proved unsuccessful, Miss Holden
added. On Jan. 10, 1962, in zero
degree weather, picket lines were
set up outside the housing devel-
opment. This was the first time
direct action had been used in con-
nection with housing discrimina-
tion in Michigan.
Further Demonstration
Picket lines were also formed in
front of other Reaume and Dodd
holdings. A four mile march on
the Ann Arbor City Council re-
sulted in a statement that "dis-
crimination in housing because of
race, color, creed or national ori-
gin is a violation of the city's
public policy."
As a result of the pressure put
on them Pittsfield Village, Inc.
adopted a non-discriminatory pol-
icy. There are now three Negro'
families living in Pittsfield Village.
At present, Ann Arbor CORE
has merged with AAAFHA and
they are working on other cases of
discrimination in housing and in
support of the fair housing ordi-
nance they have proposed to the
City Council.

(Continued from Page 1)
"my inclination is to favor the
University-branch arrangement."
Milliken commented that he has
not formally polled the Senate on
the Jamrich plan, but "my offhand
guess is that it probably would not
be approved in the Senate."
He stressed that he would not
use his position as education com-
mittee chairman to block the bill,
and vowed to promote an "objec-
tive consideration" of it in the
Senate.
The thumb area's new senator,
William Leppien (R-Saginaw),
whose predecessor had fought sim-
ilar Delta bills in the past, said
his main objective is to get his
constituents a four-year college.
Meanwhile, work on the Univer-
sity-branch plan is continuing.
University Executive uVice -Presi-
dent Marvin L. Niehuss said last
night that the talks between Uni-
versity and Delta officials are "go-
ing smoothly." "Our work with
Delta is not dependent on the
programs of the Jamrich bill," he
added.
Rep. Montgomery, a member of
the House Education Committee,
pointed out that the choice be-
tween the "piggy-back" bill and
the University-branch idea is not
.an either-or proposition. "The
Voice Announces
Platform Meeti
Voice political party will hold a
membership meeting at 11 a.m. to-
day in Rm. 3' MN of the Union.
Voice will discuss its platform and
also consider further candidate en-
dorsements.

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 P.M.
r

passage of the Jamrich bill
wouldn't preclude the new college's
becoming a University branch in
the future," he noted. Montgomery
said that such an annexation then
would require only a resolution of
permission by the Legislature.
Green, also commenting on the
branch idea, said that he had orig-
inally favored it over the inde-
pendent-college concept of the
Jamrich plan. However, he has
subsequently become "somewhat
disillusioned with the operation of
branches-especially the Univer-
sity's branch at Flint."

........

-ON

TODAY at 2:00
3rd floor of S.A.B.
FOLKLORE SOCIETY
membership meeting,
folksing, and workshop
Everyone Invited
PLEASE BRING
YOUR INSTRUMENTS

I

NANYOLON KEEa, WYNN'
EXTRA
DONALD DUCK CARTOON

I mummmw

Continuous Today
and Sunday from 1 P.M.
IENIOUS!
Wn as oe
edies"THE SEASON'S
BEST COMEDY.~
-Uf. Mag"zIne
WICKEDLY,
WONDERFULLY
-Timewmcqun
"A
a BRILLIANT
FARCE!"
-NowYorker Magazine

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USE OF THIS COLUMN for an-
nouncements is available to officially
recognized and registered organizations
only. Organizations who are planning
to be active for the Spring semester
should register by Feb. 25. Forms
available, 1011 Student Activities Bldg.
Congregational Disciples E & R Stud.
Guild, Seminar: History of Christian
Thought, Rev. J. E. Edwards, 8:30-10:30
a.m. & 7:30-8:30 p.m.; Relaxation, Good
Conversation, "Different" Refreshments,
8:30 p.m.; Feb. 24, 802 Monroe.
* s s
Gilbert & Sullivan Society, Meeting of
Chorus, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., Union, Rm. 30.
s * s
Voice Political Party, Open Meeting to
Draft Platform for SGO Elections, Feb.
23, 11 a.m., Union, Rms. 3M-N; Mass
Meeting - all campus organizational
meeting of Voice endorsed candidates
and prospective workers for the coming
SGC campaign. Artists, pamphleteers,
and organizers wanted, Feb. 25, 7:30
p.m., Union, Rms. 3R-8.
Cercle Francais, Une Soirde des Chan-
sons Folklorique, Feb. 26, 8 p.m., 3050
F'B.
Graduate Outing Club, Skiing 9:00
a.m., Hiking 2:00 p.m. both Sunday,
Rackham, Huron St. Entrance.

4 Ibs.- $100
25c each
Additional pound
Cash and Carry Only

.C CINEMA GUILD preent4
TONIGHT and TOMORROW at 7 and 9
James Jones' Heroic Novel
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
starring
BURT LANCASTER - DEBORAH KERR
FRANK SINATRA - ERNEST BORGNINE
kAnmLTIrI%jLAEDV fPI 3CT 3' MM UA DCC

get Lots More fromI IM

more body
in the blend
more navor
in the smoke
:ZDOmore taste

M
7
EfiS

M , '97-i M A

I

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