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February 01, 1963 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1,1963

JUST LIKE CAGERS:
Debate Team Enjoys Winning Season
I"- f1#TA I " 'XTT ml1 T

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BOYNE MT.
CABERFAE SKI AREA
CRYSTAL MT.
DRYDEN
GRAMPIAN
AU SABLE
MT. BRIGHTON
MT. CHRISTIE
MT. HOLLY
IRISH HILLS
SUMMIT SKI CLUB
CADILLAC SANDS
HOLIDAY HOUSE

By RONALD WILTON
The Debate Team is not as old
The University basketball team as the basketball team, having
and the University Debate Team been completely reorganized only
have one thing in common this last year. It is now an independent
year-they are both having good student organization registered
seasons. with the Office of Student Af-
Immuno toxicologyMen
Study 'Monday :Disease'

Ifairs, receiving its funds from

$ s
S'3 ski
passbook
Reg. $10

the

HAWAIIAN
GARDENS
HOWARD
JOHNSONS

Actually over $450 worth
of g°°st passes for lift tick-
ets, equipment rental, ski
weeks, food, lodging, when-
ever two people ski to-
gether!

Many More

In almost any case one ski trip pays for the original cost
of membership and you or your guests can ski the rest
of the season ON THE HOUSE!
Great for dating. Take your girl for dinner and skiing
at no cost to you. Beginners, ski twice as much on the
same budget. Cut the high cost of family skiing by
bringing the wife or kids along free. And if you've been
thinking of the sport-you"ll never have a better op-
portunity to start.
One person pays.. . One goes free with the guest pass . ,. and there
are over 53 passes with three or more to each of the ski areas listed!
What's the gimmick? There is none. These outstanding areas want
you to try their facilities. What better way?
Available at
SPORTS UNLIMITED INC. I 2535A.B

If you're sick of work, especially
Mondays, some help is on the way
from University public health re-
searchers.
They're specialists in immuno-
toxicology, a form of poisoning
which is strangely aided by the
body's normal mechanism for de-
fense against disease. Somehow,
the defense mechanism contrib-
utes to the illness.
The researchers are particular-
ly interested in "The Monday Di-
seases," a group of aliments
marked by chills, fever and sever
coughing attacks which reach a
peak each Monday.
Symptoms Abate.
By Tuesday, the flu-like symp-
toms begin to abate. Wednesday
brings only brief chills and a
slight cough. Then the victim re-
covers for the rest of the week,
but on Monday he starts the pat-
terns all over again.
One of about six such research
laboratories in the world, the im-
munotoxicolgy facility is a focal
point for studies of these di-
seases. Headed by Prof. Vernon
N. Dodson, the section is part of
the industrial health laboratories
in the public health school.
Researching the problem calls
for highly sophisticated methods
because the investigators do not
deal with a simple cause-and-ef-
fect situation. They work in a
complex field of reactions and
counter-reactions as the body's
defense mechanism responds to
faint traces of zinc, copper or

magnesium-the common causa-
tive agents.
Diverse Studies
They seek answers through di-
verse studies of allergic responses,
viruses, metabolic rates a n d
hitch-hiking chemical molecules.
The seven-day pattern of the
Monday disease holds a suggestion
that it could be a metabolic
phenomenon Prof. Dodson says.
The patient apparently loses his
defense against the fumes during
weekends away from his job. So
on Monday, it strikes hard. He
builds tolerance during the rest of
the work week, but loses it over
Saturday and Sunday.
Prof. Dodson created zinc-fume
fever in a rabbit, gave a bit of
the animal's blood to a second
rabbit, and some of the second's
blood to a third. He found that
rabbit number three was then
susceptible to the fever. This
marked the first time that the
reaction had been "transferred"
that far from the original victim.
Not Allergy
Although the Monday disease
remains a medical mystery, the
evidence to date indicates that it
is not a true allergy, Prof. Dod-
son says.. So researchers are seek-
ing answers elsewhere.
Human volunteers, including
Prof. Dodson himself, are cur-
rently wearing zinc patches over
tiny abrasions on their forearms.
They hope this will reveal new
information about how blood cells
behave in the presence of the
metal.

speech department.
The team has participated in
three major tournaments so far
this year. The first was the Group
Action Tournament at Michigan
State University attended by 15
schools. The University entered
two teams, one of which took
second place.
25 Schools
In the Milwaukee Yearling
Tournament at which 25 schools
were represented, the club also
entered two teams, one of which
won four out of four matches
while the other split four.
Atthe Rochestertournament,
attended by 40 schools from all
over the nation, the club came in
fourth. In addition, Everett Woods,
'65, took second place in the in-
dividual speaker competition.
This semester the club plans to
enter three more large tourna-
ments: one in New York City this
month, the annual Delta Sigma
Rho Conference here in April and
the Big Ten Conference at Min-
neapolis in May.
Try-Out Meetings
The team holds an organiza-
tional meeting for all interested
students once a semester. Anyone
who trys out is accepted. New ap-
plicants learn debating techniques
for at least a semester, by which
time they are usually adequate de-
baters. At present the team has
25 members.
Prof. Kenneth Anderson of the
speech department is the faculty
representative for the team. The
coaches, Thomas Mozer, Melvin
Donahoe, William Reed, and Mary
Ann Klaarin are all graduate stu-
dents.
The coaches work with the team
members in preparing them for
tournaments., "Preparation is
equivalent to taking one to two
extra liberal arts courses," it is
emphasized. A standard tourna-
ment round lasts 60 minutes with
each team getting two ten minute
and two five minute periods.

To Present'
Arms Limit
13roadcas ts
The issue of international arms
control and disarmament and its
many implications will be ex-
plored on a number of programs
produced by Broadcasting Service.
Background, a Broadcasting
Service program that has been
aired weekly since Juner1958, will
feature a number of interviews.
The Soviet Union's stand on
arms control and disarmament
will be discussed Thursday by
Victor Karpov, first secretary of
the Soviet embassy in Washing-
ton.
The following week, two top
United States experts will discuss
this country's disarmament posi-
tion, Disarmament Agency Direc-
tor William C. Foster and John
T. McNaughton, general counsel
for the department of defense, will
be heard.
Among the other persons to be
featured on Background in the
coming weeks are Robert Matte-
son of the Arms Control and Dis-
armament Agency who will relate
a number of his personal exper-
iences in world diplomacy includ-
ing early talks with Soviet lead-
ers; Lt. Col. Harold Aaron, direc-
torate for arms control in the
defense department; Prof. Sey-
mour Melman of Columbia Uni-
versity, and Sen. Hubert Hum-
phrey (D-Minn) who will discuss
the need for regional arms con-
trol agreements as an essential
step to total disarmament.

Barry Assumes Post
For Medical School

By PHILIP SUTIN
Prof. Alexander Barry of the
Medical School was appointed as-
sistant dean of that school at the
January Regents meeting to serve
half-time, coordinating Medical
School and Medical Center expan-
sion plans.
The exact duties of the post
have not yet been defined, Prof.
Barry said, but he will represent
the dean and the Medical School
executive committee on the vari-
ous building committees that plan
medical facilities.
"The dean has many responsi-
bilities and has limited time to fol-
low day by day the building com-
mittees," Prof. Barry pointed out.

He explained his post "was par-
tially created because Medical
Center expansion plans have been
set by the Regents, and the school
needs someone to make certain the
building plans fit into the overall
concept."
A $29 million MedicalCenter ex-
pansion program was approved by
the Regents in January, 1961. The
long-range program is to be fi-
nanced by private and public
sources.
Currently, the Medical Center is
requesting a second medical sci-
ence unit and a children's hospi-
tal from the state Legislature.
Both are urgently needed, Prof.
Barry noted, especially since,'the
Legislature had promised the sec-
ond medical science unit when the
Medical School expanded to 200
freshmen students 10 years ago.
The Medical Center recently re-
emphasized its need for a new
children's hospital to replace the
current crowded wing of the gen-
eral hospital in a special four-
page issue of the University Hos-
pital Star, the house organ of
the Medical Center.
In addition to his work on capi-
tal outlay, he will also be given
curriculum and counseling re-
sponsibility.
Prof. Barry has served on the
Medical School's curriculum com-
mittee and on the medical science
building committee.
He does not plan to serve more
than half-time as assistant dean
for "administrators who are not
teaching become isolated."

:.

PROF. ALEXANDER BARRY
... dividing time

POLITICAL COALITIONS:
Gamson Views Award-winnin Paper

.

Also Available?,
Movies, Sports

'63 Entertainment
. . $51

Book. 140 Passes for Dining,

_

By THOMAS DRAPER
Prof. William A. Gamson of the
sociology department recently de-
scribed as "a surprising Christmas
present" his $1,000 award from the
American Association for the Ad-
vancement of Science for a paper
on political coalitions.
Prof. Gamson explained that
there are two parts to the paper.
"The first part presents a mathe-
matical function with three or
four variables which predicts win-'
ning political coalitions. The sec-
ond part is a write-up of an ex-

This is the spot for
BARGAINS in New and Used

BUSHIED?
S TA
STA

periment which tests the validity
of this function."
In the experiment seven students
from two different fraternities
were given votes. They were to use
their votes to come to a decision
about various proposals.
Final Association
"Contrary to what we expected,
the fraternity association 'made
little difference in the final vot-
ing," Prof. Gamson said. "One of
the interesting results of the ex-
periment .was that a person who
starts out in the strongest voting
bloc has a smaller probability of
being. in the final coalition than
someone who is initially in a weak-
er voting bloc."'
He said that this applies when-
ever the strong voting bloc is both
smaller- than the number needed
for decision and smaller than the
numbei needed for "band wagon
appeal."
"There was a third part to the
paper concerned with presidential
nominations which I didn't sub-
mit, but which I personally found
the most interesting," Prof. Gam-,
son said. "By studying the first
balloting of the national conven-
tions since 1900, the voter strength
of each ideology, and the charac-
ter potential of the nominees, I
tried to predict the final coalition.
Three Publish
Fishery Text
Three University zoologists have
combined talents to produce a
new book titled "Ichthyology"
(The Study of Fishes).
Designed as a comprehensive
textbook for introductory fishery
courses, the 488-page, illustrated
volume is the work of Prof. Karl
F. Lagler of the natural resources
school, chairman of the fisheries
department, and Prof. Robert R.
Miller, curator of fishes in the
zoology museum.
The text is an outgrowth of the
course in ichthyology taught by
Lagler for more than 20 years.

"Using my theory, the chance
probability of nomination could be
improved upon by 30-40 per cent."
Prof. Gamson received his PhD
in sociology at the University in
1959. He taught at Harvard for
three years, then returned to the
University last September.
Prof. Gamson is now working on
community conflicts and politics.
He is centering this research on
the fluoridation issue. He said that
he was trying to determine what
factors of a society determine
community cleavage on issues.
Stady Ways
To Distort
Radar Images
The radiation laboratory of the
electrical engineering department
is engaged in research to lessen
the identification effectiveness of
enemy radar on missiles and air-
craft.
The laboratory is making "radar
cross section" tests to determine
the radar pattern characteristics
of the missile or aircraft. This pat-
tern is determined by the shape of
the vehicle the material it is made
of.
For example, "penetration aid"
devices associated with ICBM re-
entry problems have been examin-
ed in both theoretical and experi-
mentalprograms. The aim, labora-
tory director Ralph E. Hiatt ex-
plained, is to improve these de-
vices and better disguise the ve-
hicle.
Rlesearch on 'he radar antenna
of the proposed RS-70 bomber is
underway, he noted. Problems
arose in the design of this antenna
because its location in the air-
craft affected its performance.
The laboratory is attempting to
find an acceptable radar antenna
pattern despite location difficul-
ties.
The unit is also investigating
variations in radar patterns caus-
ed by the addition of fins to a
missile, Hiatt said.

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