100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WENESDAY.

____C _ AN D IY Vl~l~fA

FIN L QAR**X 1.

AT COUNCIL:
To View SGC Affiliate Aid

Research Advances Economy

FARMER-

(Continued from Page 1)
elected members from the campus
at-large, and 10 ex-officios with-
out voting power. The proposal
requests SGC to put the motion
on the ballot as a referendum in
next month's elections.
Currently there are 18 SGC
members, 11 elected in all cam-
pus elections, and seven ex-of-
ficios-heads ofmajor student or-
ganizations. All have equal voting
rights.,
In proposing a geographical dis-
tricting system, the committee
criticized the current electionpro-
cedures using the Hare system on
the following grounds:
Hard Pinpointing
The system makes it difficult to
pinpoint individual votes, and
Council members have little ides
who their constiuency is.
Voter knowledge of individual
candidates is almost impossible;
because of the number of can-
didates and the large area all
the candidates have to reach.
The Hare system under which
'voting is conducted undermines
conditions for a strong and stable
government because of the num-
ber of factions it represents. This
causes little unity of opinion on
Council.
It's A Hard Life
Elections are difficult for can-
didates because they only have
time to touch on the high spots
and major issues, and because
they cannot work closely with
other candidates of similar views
as all are fighting for the same
first place vote.
Public apathy results from. the
impossible task of knowing all the
candidates and issues, under-
standing the 'Hare system, and
having to make a' wide range of
discrete differentiations.
The committee's plans would set
up seven;campus districts of, ap-
proximately equal student popula-
tion. Elections would be held twice
a year with each district electing
one member each time. The pesi-
dent and vice-president would be
eeted in the fall.
No Residency
Candidates would not have to
live in the district they with to
represent.
Provision has been m'ade for
automatic redistricting to pro-
vide as equal representation as
DIAL 2-6264

possible. An SGC committee would the fewest votes is dropped, and
have permanent authority to re- the second votes on his ballots
district. Criteria for such re- are distributed to the other can-
districting would be major popula- didates. This process is repeated

<,
<.

x".k
IIA

}S
* <
F "{
k .,, .: ....:.
h :.:;.r::.:::::::<
., ..:

...7 r}. .: W
TIr

1
>:
:-*:a.
>, +:
:
!* ':::;
;.
;:x
' !!!

' J-

}; .. :X

...... . ....

.{: ,{
+ :i
: : '

.:ti:: iis:"ii ?}i:":;:}:i: : ::::i;. }: }:i i:" ;:u i {:': SS
K} ,r
::i :r+.v..ti" iii: ":tv: ?::}:: :{;?j'::,::{?':;.;: . :;; ti:_{::{ ., :::i{

_ . _ _

lo:
;:". _ *.. : - , ...:;' . ff... " ::.... r...::.::? .;; "": ":"#' :;:fit
.. :.. ? .#_ . . :.,.::: w>;o-a :.: :;}}:{{"v:::; :J}s": ..'S'ri;. -.
xg- X.
} :.. T - "'a:i4{3r"F ' . ",+? ':x' :w ,lrw- t+h'v':a:%+K F ...; -; ., ;:>y: "':}=,'2 rr i?#'"' at .: '
4k. r' Y:"
" d .-:. "a
4
cr'' {. sa
':'tip^".:::i}}}":: r:i"}:'." " {"i} ":
..7. 'ji? 41:. . $}]'Mr i:j !R :::"}r +rX::r.} , y,
"405,
".a
t .. t : :::,":::} :3 tit " 's , "' - ." $;:'':}.:+"..::r>"; r'r: r: ': +v
y .. .. ........
:"}}:tiff i iv:; ."- ". :" ::vi .:.

(Continued from Page 1)
"I think one thing that is sad-
ly lacking in our college research
programs is a sense of responsi-
bility to industry," Senate major-
ity leader, Sen. Stanley Thayer
(R-Ann Arbor), declared.
"At this time Michigan's uni-
versities do not seem to realize
Across
Campus
Prof. C. S. Simons of the Medi-
cal School will speak on "Radia-
tion Protection Regulations" at
7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 3D of the
Michigan Union.
Animal Care . ..
Prof. Bennett J. Cohen of the
Medical School will discuss prob-
lems of animal care and experi-
mentation at 4 p.m. today in Rm.
2501 East Medical Bldg.
MAD Language ...
Brice Carnhan, assistant direc-
tor of the Ford Foundation com-
puter project, will explore an "In-
troduction to High Speed Digital
Computers and the MAD Language
at 7:30 pm. today in the Natural
Science Aud.
Radiosensitivity .. .
Prof. Berwind P. Kaufman of
the zoology department will dis-
cuss radiosensitivity in cytology
at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 1400 Chem-
istry Bldg.
Search for Meaning.
Prof. Viktor Frankel of the Uni-
versity of Vienna will speak on
"Man's Search for Meaning" at
4:00 p.m., today in Hill Aud.
sponsored by the Office of Reli-
gious Affairs. A second lecture,
"Existence and Values," co-
sponsored by "Challenge," will be
given at 4:00 p.m. tomorrow in
Hill Aud. Both lectures are open
to the public.
Moscow Radio. . .
Prof. William S. Howell of the
University of Minnesota will speak
of "A Visit to Radio Moscow" at
4 p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Public Service
A panel of graduates of the
Institute of Public Administration
will discuss "What the Public
Service Is Really Like and How
To Get Ready for It" at 8:00 p.m.
today in the West Conf. Rm.,
Rackham.

the role they play in the econo-
my--I think it is time they shaped
up."
The new House Committee on
Economic Growth has sought to
encourage research propects. Gov.
George Romney's recommendation
of a $750,000 research fund is the
result of the committee's effort.
Another committee recommenda-
tion is for funds to help the Mich-
igan College of Mining and Tech-
nology develop better iron ore
processes.
The University's main institu-
tion for stimulating research is the
Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy. Created in 1959, it spends
$900,000 of the state's money a
year to encourage research and
the development of research-
oriented industries.
Middle Range
Prof. James T. Wilson of the
geology department, the acting-
director of IST, said that research-
based industry could help the state
develop industries in the middle
range of the gross national prod-
uct where the prospect for growth
is best.
To this end, IST recently com-
pleted surveys of the state's ma-
chine tool and metal fabrication
industries.
IST's main role as an economic
stimulator is to serve as match-
maker between research facilities
and industry. One of its major
divisions helps companies with re-
search problems find facilities to
solve them.
Product Development
These industries are referred to
private research and testing fa-
cilities for product development,
to University researchers or fac-
ulty members for consultations or
if the research is of a basic na-
ture, the University may do it,
Prof. Wilson explained.
"The University is making a val-
iant effort to act as an interface
between the industrial hand aca-
demic community," he said.
However, the University will not
become a "testing lab" for in-
dustry, Prof. Wilson declared. "If
the University is set up to solve
industries' routine problems, then
its strength as a great university
disappears.
Educational Effort
"It is not the University's busi-
ness to undertake product devel-
opment. It is to do basic research
-a part and parcel of the educa-
tional effort. The University has
to produce new ideas to be a good
university," he asserted.
IST is about to begin a survey
of university-industry contacts.
Prof. Wilson explained that the
University has many contracts
with industry. Some may come to
IST, others may go to the relevant

department, some may see a lead-
ing professor in the field that is
here and some industry leaders
may turn to a former teacher for
help, he said.
Prof. Wilson indicated that the
survey's aim is not to centralize
University-industry contacts, but
to gauge its volume and improve
its effectiveness.
Defense Contracts
The institute engages in other
activities to stimulate the growth
of research related industries. It
holds conferences and symposia
for state industries to indicate
how it can get the most out of re-
search. A major one last fall dealt
with procurement of Defense De-
partment contracts.
Prof. Wilson said that IST plans
to expand this activity once it
moves into its North Campus
building next summer.
IST has brought, through its
sponsored research program, new
staff and put them in areas of
technological importance. Its fel-
lowships, Prof. Wilson explained,
support future scientists.
Stem Outflow
It also attempts to stem the
outflow of scientific talent from
the region with research money
and job opportunities.
Prof. Wilson cautioned that re-
search can work "no overnight
solution. Nothing reverses the sit-
uation overnight."
The University has reacted dif-
fidently to Romney's research
fund proposal. Its $750,000 is a
drop in the bucket compared to
the $36 million spent on research
each year, but the University can
use this money to help research
fund-starved disciplines, Savyer
explained.
"The proposal is a little 'iffy'
yet. If the money is available, the
University will ask for things it
considers desirable and which do
not get federal support," he said.
Operating Provisions
Sawyer said University partici-
pation in the fund depended on its
nature and operating provisions.
The fund will be managed by the
newly-created Economic Expan-
sion Council. This group of 25
citizens from various facets of
state life will oversee the spur-
ring of state development, Burs-
ley explained. A subcommittee of
scientists may specifically handle
the fund, he speculated.
"If the program pays off, I
expect to be expanded," Bursley
said. "Seven-hundred fifty thou-
sands dollars is not very much
money.
Bursley and Beadle expect pass-
age of the fund, the only new pro-
gram of Romney this year.
Tomorrow: Research and the
city.

By DIANE PINE'
James Farmer, founder of the
Congress of Racial Equality spoke
Monday night on the origins and
activities of CORE.
The movement was founded in
1942 by students at the University
of Chicago, Farmer said. The
group was formed for the purpose
of applying non-violent direct ac-
tion techniques to the problem of
discrimination.
Their first case was in a res-
taurant located on Chicago's
South Side. Farmer and a friend
went into it simply wanting cof-
fee, and anticipating no trouble,
related Farmer. When the owner
refused to serve them they simply
sat and waited until he decided the
only way to get Farmer and ,his
,friend out of the restaurant was
to give them what they wanted.'
The two men drank their coffee
and left.
Return to Scene
A few nights later they returned
to the restaurant with several
other members of their group.
The party sat down and waited
for service.
The person in charge became
very excited and threatened to
call the police, Farmer said. The
leader of Farmer's group urged
the manageress to do this.

Founder of CORE
Speaks on Origins

When the police arrived they
found no one disturbing the peace
and informed the manageress that
they could not arrest anyone as
there was no disturbance. When
the police left, the woman, not
knowing what else to do, served
the entire group.
Ghandian Techniques
From this incident the group
formulated the non-violent direct
action principles, taken from
Ghandian techniques, that CORE
groups use today, Farmer said.
Since that first incident, CORE
groups have been working to end
discrimination all over the coun-
try. Farmer emphasized the fact
that discrimination in America
: not confined to the South. In
fact, .rarmer continued, discrimin-
ation in the North is actually in-
creasing rather than decreasing.
Academy Report
Cites Increase
The number of university facul-
ty members who are also mem-
bers of the National Academy
Science is increasing, the Acade-
my said in a recent report. The
University has three mepbers of
the Academy on its faculty.

' r{

*
'4 4'

Ii

:.
:::}

i FOR THAT HARD TO FIND BOOK1

-Daily-Kenneth Winter
DISTRICTING PROPOSAL - Student Government Council's
Committee on Student Concerns has suggested this plan for
election of SGC candidates by district. Districts one, two, four
and seven would extend outward to include more distant resi-
dences while district three's boundary turns northeast from
Washtenaw Ave. at Berkshire to form a rough triangle. North
Campus residences would be in district one.

I

TRY
SER~VING THE& UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN* ' -
FtACUL.TY AND S"TUDL.NTs ^ArTHE1CAMI P1JC,
STATE STR~EET AT NORTR UNIVERSITY, ANN AIt 8O.

I

tion shifts, and automatic redis-
tricting before the next election
if a district does not have be-
tween 10 and 25 per cent of the
total vote or the total population.
Problem
Under such a plan gerrymander-
ing would be a constant problem,
but the committee feels that it
solves many more situations than
it creates.
Election procedure would be by
the alternate vote system. In a
particular district voters would list
their choice of candidates in or-
der of 'preference. Then the bal-
lots would be counted according to
first place votes, and if any can-
didate received a majority, he
would be elected. If no candidate
has 'a majority, the candidate with

until one candidate receives a
majority.
Besides a president and vice-
president, Council officers would
include a personnel director and
a treasurer.
Hatcher To Speak
At Alumni Fete
University President H a r 1 a n
Hatcher will speak on the Univer-
sity as a graduate and professional
center at the annual Congression-'
al Dinner in Washington tonight.
The dinner, sponsored by the Uni-
versity Club in Washington, is in
honor of University alumni in na-
tional governmental service.

=:1.:..
_C "
wr.
:
i

sE

TODAY THRU FRIDAY

own at 1:00-5:05 and 9:18

,1

U

d X
ddr
she..,*o
COLUMBIA PICTURES prots
A FRED KOHLMAR-RICHARD QNE PRODUTON'
" 1wk

I
I
I

Starts
Thursday

rrrn" + e."}M1WY.:"+r::^: y "r",," " " r aYrr "rva
"'": af' " 'f.V.".VY.",ti::V:1V:~: Jw "YrG.4:VL::11ct5'.:^:"'": A .:".":."3:!+i'F Y'"'1"Yn':1G:". .:V.:":" rr Y. ".Vf rY".YYYfr.:V.'.::^::'.:V:r"GVa 1. 1"r rr>Y
.YY. _ ... ":T"+ ......4 . :.{.a ...... ..... ...r. f":" .. r.> . 1r ..F r r.. >i"
..+. lvv ar."r. rv.'mrr-s";t.1"tivrats. v:n ..: .. ..... ..... .o.v .... f'> .....r. . a .{..fL. r....... .t . s :v7.. :C
-e + Y ". "xYr++f. :. rrr 1 ::"r vM1C+ :CfY::: t". .. r....l.:Trrri......... .... .. . 1 . .11{+ "::+ :.
+>. "rfrrls. AfCfC .... , Mr:'., 'i' ...1.. .. .. .... . ... . . . . . . . Y ........ ..... .t .S>... ,A...: .. ... .... . .... R. .fY.Z'+ M1..r ..: 'til '' ..34"r>t'.%S ,f7 .. t........... G. .. r.... J. a ..1.0...
1¢V.4 J." .+,a .V X .y ": f.". S4"" .A r.1> Y:.t'J .S+. a,4> Wu..:,.t.",,.Y:11'At11 .","s,.r. . ,{" . ..f '"?' ... 4iir'C1Sa ". ":f4 .4 n,1.4" .r.C'4{m..7::,zaarSM1 ..,.si
1> 1 ru'1S".4fY.>1Vf:1 Y7, w1.14'.r~J: '.'f+:{ "JJ 1''i1'f'::C 's{{fti>rw1 ' ",91".'i,"."l.".',IV,>WA111"w1'>Y.,.;1.1'4"A'."Jrr.Y.1Y..1.:..,,..++.tu,..rtr'1a4".1n1+"a7w!,1"J.'s':.{4:Sr...r.>,.,,.AL1'.4.,.,,d,4Y.1'Vi"1.>{41VrrJJ rJLV4 ,.iLWLJ'J.41 1,.. "J:V 1"14.f"'SY ,:4'w>'S A,""J "rJ.,u . >W 1
f
r
DAILY , j
" -
Y
:.vw:rr.": "r""..:",":.. v.Y" :: "Yar. v vv
"v xV. ". . sv vr" vr.1: ^.r-"n"+ . v.".".. .a:"vr"+ ":vv"r:"rM1>x>v-"v:rn m. xxVrr" 4>"""r.- .: :"ovnv.G" tG:^r.: oc11>v."vcvrr, M1"r ::t:"" -."Y.r1v . "G:4:t^r""""""";""-s: ««1~r«,""xy;.f ."""."v."v.1:L::vo.".t v:.v+::::"fr.1"V+r rf ""
:v: r. ra ,411 "ro". 1 r. .. .. ,. " ,","
........ . L ........ .... ... M1..>..:. .. .. f.. .J 7.... . A.... .:{. "\,1 .. .Y..:.+L ... .."......... :.. . ... . VNrrY....... 7...1. .. A.:h::':". ... .....1L ...}.,, rrAM." 4. F:CC:f.. :fi:1 '1",
..;'h. >..a ..7..r. 77.... «.C.. .. r........ ..v\ r. .,r .r,........ r; r YJfJ. ""VJ7:"
, .$iti ... ........... .roc .....:>. }4v.: ..M."J. >... k
:. > .. sJ,"h"" .. . ,...J?.".....>... ,.........e4or... a."."rr.,..,...,.7.:::r" ..,......".{:",v1V:+ :Ya.....,.,,,,. U,4",,...:".C"c e...,...,...:rJ ,.........is.>: «C"LBt:., ,., vn>;t,. '"': >'1 s '",S "}4 ....'}'.>1 .: 1 }"7: ,..70Q}'7G
AC4, ...............1"J.o>Wt..av..".':k'?h.,.nfn> ;. n"."."."rn>'s.....J.,...".r,....Jn1Ct . .rs,,.. .7">Y> r n";w. . ... ?:.".":.".".".e:

1

Starts
Thursday

Sizzling farcel Deliciously ingenious,
grandly diabolic!, A film that will
go down as one of the great comedies!
Mastrolanni staggers us with a droll
performance that' is nothing short of

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Day caleindar
4:00 p.m.-Dept. of Anatomy Seminar
-Dr. Bennett J. Cohen, Dept. of Physi-
ologyn"Problems of Animal Care and
Experimentation": Rm. 2501, E. Medi-
cal Bldg.
4:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Assembly
-Dr. William S. Howell, Dept. of

I N6iAk EIiAii

I,

=102 I I I

0 - U
AND WALK
kind
.....love
ory!
RtA~RR!N
JAEFONDA"M
Shown at 3:12 & 7:25 Only

Shows at 7-9 P.M.
ENDS TONIGHT
JOSEPH E LEVINE
JEAN PAUL CLAUDIA
BELMONDO CARDINALE
a woman's touch
becomes a man's
obsession l
Viaccia
AN EMBASSY PIfURESRELEASE
* THURSDAY *
MARCEL
MASTROIANNI

Speech, Univ. of Minn., "A Visit to Ra-
dio Moscok": Rackham Lecture Hall.
4:00 p.m.-Dept. of Zoology Seminar-
Dr. Berwind P. Kaufmann, Dept. of
Zoology, "Cytological Evaluation of
Problems of Differential Radiosensitiv-
ity": Rm. 1400, Chem. Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-Office of Religious Affairs
Lecture-Dr. Viktor Franks, Viennese
psychiatrist, "Man's Search for Mean-
ing": Hill Aud.
7:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild Commemora-
tion Program for the Civil War Cen-
tennial-Audie Murphy and Bill Maul-
din inl "The Red Badge of Courage";
shorts, "The True Story of the Civil
War" (from Brady photographs) and "A
Time Out of War": Architecture Aud.
7:30 pm.-Project on Computers in
Engrg. Education Introductory Com-
puter Lecture Series-Brice Carnahan,
Assistant Director, Ford Foundation
Project on Computers, "Introduction to
High Speed Digital Computers and the
MAD Language": Nat. Science Aud.
8:00 p.m.-Institute of Public Admin.
Social Seminar - Panelists: Richard
Beers, Budget Division, Dept. of Admin.,
Lansing; Betty Lou Morris, Mt. Clemens;
Edward Potthoff, City Manager, Sagi-
naw; and Emerson Elliott, Bureau of
the Budget, Washington, D.C., "What
the Public Service is Really Like and
How to Get Ready for It": W. Confer-
ence Rm., Rackham Bldg.
8:00 pm.-Research Club-Will meet
in the Rackham Amphitheatre. The
Council will meet at 7:15 p.m. in the E.
Council Em. The first paper will be by
Prof. Fred T. Haddock, prof. of Astron-
omy and Electrical Engrg., and Director
Radio Astronomy Observatory, on "Cos-
mic Magnetic Fields and Polarized Ra-
dio Waves." Second paper will beby
Prof. Horace' W. Dewey, prof. of Rus-
sion, Dept. of Slavic Languages and
Literatures, and of History on "Mod-
ern Soviet Controversies about Ancient
Russian Immunities."
8:30 p.m.-Professional Theatre Pro-
gram Shakespeare Festival-Assoc. of
Producing Artists Resident Co. of the
U.M in "The Merchant of Venice":
Trueblood Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-Chamber Music Festival-
The first concert will be given tonight
in Rackham Aud., by members of the
Budapest String Quartet, and Eugene
Istomin, piani t. The following program
will be presented: Piano Quartet in E-
flat major, K. 493 (Mozart); iPano Trio
No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 11 (Beet-
hoven); and Piano Quartet in G minor,
Op. 25, No. 1 (Brahms).
A limited number of tickets are
available for tonight, as well as for
the balance of the Festival-Thurs.,
Fri., Sat, nights, and Sun. afternoon-

at the offices of the Musical Society
in Burton Tower, during the day; and
will be on sale in the lobby of the
Rackham Bldg. one hour preceding each
concert.
General Notices
Language Exam for Master's Degree
in History: Feb. 22, 4-5 p.m., Room 429
Mason Hall. Dictionaries may be used.
Sign the list posted in the History
Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Students and Faculty Members may
be counseled on matters pertaining to
U.S. Army commissions in the profes-
sions or other areas. Go to Rm. 212,
Temporary Classroom Bldg. between 8
a.m. and 5 p.m. Mon. thru Thurs. or
call Ext. 3306 for an appointment.
History Make-up Examinations will be
held Sat., Feb. 23, 9-12 a.m. in Rm. 429
Mason Hall. Please consult .your in-
structor and then sign the list in the
History Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Events
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
A. E. Heins will speak on "Axial-sym-
metric Boundary Value Problems,"
Thurs., Feb. 21, at 4:00 p.m. in Room
246 W. Engrg.
Refreshments will be in Rm. 350 W.
Engrg. at 3:30 p.m.
Placement
Engineers: "Interviewing Workshop"
will be conducted by Prof. John G.

-Young, Director, Engineering Placement
Service, Wed., Feb. 20, and Thurs., Feb.
21, at 4:00 p.m., in Rm. 311, West
Engineering. All interested students are
invited and engineers who expect to
graduate this year are especially urged
to attend one of these meetings.
POSITION OPENINGS:
National Education Association, Wash-
ington, D.C.-Assistant Director, Publi-
cations Div. to assist in the operation
& ! supervision of design, editing, pro-
duction & promotion services for a wide
variety of publications. MA with some
work in field of educ. At least 5 yrs.
exper. in publications work, pref. in
educ.-related publications. Two yrs. as
a teacher in a public school. Must have
skills in writing, editing, design, print-
ing & sales promotion.
Applied Research Labs, Inc., Glendale,
Calif.-Senior Scientist-PhD in Physi-
cal Sciences. Minimum 3 yrs. broad
post-doctoral 'exper. related to charged
particle & X-ray devices. Location:
Santa Barbara, Calif.
Mich. Civil Service-1) Clinical Psy-
chologist III-PhD in clinical psych.
Exper. required for higher level posi-
tion. 2) Dietitian III-BS in home econ.
with specialization in foods & nutri-
tion or institution mgmt. 3 yrs. exper.
3 Attorney III-good standing in Mich.
State Bar.
U.S. Civil Service-Architect -- for
level. GS-5 must have BS in Arch. or
Arch. Engrg. For level GS-7 must have
BS plus 1 yr. exper. or 1 yr. grad work.

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-Openings
for June grads in. Admin. Development
Prog. This program is the Agency's pri-
mary entry prog. for higher level ad-
min. mgmt. positions in the Wash., D.C.
area. Particularly interested in areas
of Econ., Soc., Psych., Bus. Ad. (includ-
ing Acc't.), Pub. Admin., Poll. Sol., or
one of the other social sciences.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
EDUCATION DIVISION:
Beginning Feb. 25, the following rep-
resentatives will be at the Bureau to
interview candidates for the school
year 1963-1964:
WED., FEB. 27-
Battle Creek, Mich. (Lakeview Sch.
Dist.)-Elem.; Set., Math, Engl., Ment.
Retd., Sp. Therapist, Visit. Teach.
Buchanan, Mich.-Elem.; Girl's PE;
Auto Mech.; Jr. HS Couns.; HS Engl.
Coldwater, Mich.-Elem., Sp. Ed., Phys.
Therap., Physics., Math/Sel., Span.,
Engl., Libr.
Oregon, Ohio-Elem.; Sec. Engi., Engl/
Fren. or Span., Fren./Span., Engl/Soc.
St., Chem., Voc. Mus.
THURS., FEB. 28-
Anaheim, Calif. (HS Dist.)-Engl., Soc.
St., Drive Ed., Ind. Arts, Math, For.
(Continued on Page 5)

JOSEPH E. LEMEqu
#MARCELLOjt#
Mastrolanni yr
Divorce,
Italian Style

U

Ends
Thursday

Shows at
" 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

in

PETER SELLERS STRIKES AGAIN!
"SAUCY
SPRIGHTLY
GAYSEX
ROMP! COMEDY!"
N. Y. POST.O .Y E
N.Y. NEWS
FoILEhDOILS
Fri; "A SON OF FLUBBER"

with

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
Rackham Auditorium
MEMBERS of
The Budapest String Quartet

"DIVORCE-
ITALIAN STYLE"

Eugene Istomin, Pianist
(appearing Wed., Thurs., and Fri. only)
REVISED PROGRAMS

I

ii

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
*.. Presents . .
P O OCQN TcEST

*F "
*-
1*-
1*

GOLD BARS & BRAID
prejeni:

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 8:30 P.M.
Piano Quartet in E-flat major, K. 493 .... Mozart
Piano Trio No. 4 in B-flat major,
Op. 11.......... .... ........ Beethoven
Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25, No. 1. . Brahms
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 8:30 P.M.
0l.- 1- £ . a . . Pre rhit V le 4790 ~ s

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 8.30 P.M.
Prelude and Fugue in F minor...... Bach-Mozart
Divertimento for String Trio in E-flat major,'
K. 563F.....F. U Y4............Mozart
Serenade in D major, Op. 8....... .Beethoven
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2:30 P.M.
Prelude and Fugue in D minor...... Bach-Mozart

l

$200 in CASH PRIZES

I

!lI

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan