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February 01, 1963 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FR WAY,

acehng about Communism

Berle To View Economy
In Cook Lecture Series

AMBULATORY PATIENTS:
Dickinson To Start Medical Care Stu

system and the Evanston Town-9
ship school system in Evanston,1
Ill., among others.
Argument For
The argument for teaching com-
parative government has been suc-
cessfully expressed by Ernest S.
Pisko who says: "only by studying
the Communist system and by
comparing it with their own and
other Western varieties of democ-
racy will they (students) acquire
strength through knowledge-the.
moral strength needed in a politi-
cal struggle of global dimensions."
Certain advocates of teaching
comparative studies note that
teaching communism alone will
give the students a biased view
and it is necessary to instill the
belief in them in their own, demo-
cratic system.
E. Merrill Root, in his book
"Brainwashing in the High
Schools," demands that the schools
teach, through American history
and c o m p a r a t i v e government'
courses, that the democratic socie-
ty is most advantageous and thus
avoid the brainwashing which oc-
curred in Korea.
History Course
Other advocates of teaching'
communism to high school stu-
dents-almost all persons agree'
that the students should be on the
senior high level at least and most
prefer that they be seniors-see
an American history course or
study of European history as the
vehicle for study.
Prof. Frank Freidel of Harvard
University and author of two
American history textbooks of his
own, writes "I feel strongly that
any well-taught American history
course should serve much more ef-
fectively to conquer communism,
than a rote indoctrination."
He explains that a good history
course would inculcate critical
thinking and create flexibility of
mind which would allow the stu-
dent to "avoid making or swallow-
ing pat answers."
Michigan Bill
Indicative of the interest shown
in the field was a bill proposed in
the state Legislature last year,
asking for a statewide requirement
of a comparative government
course. The bill was passed by the
House but killed by the Senate
education committee.
Sen. Thomas Schweigert (R-Pe-
toskey), member of the committee
who voted against the bill, noted
that "the committee felt that the
state should not invade the prerog-
atives of the local school districts.
"The district is the best judge
of its own teaching facilities and
textbooks and therefore is strictly
a local matter."
Government Course
"I took a comparative govern-
ment course in college which was
fairly tough," the senator rem-

inisced. "This course (in compara-
tive government) was to be aimed
at the high school level and the
question must come up as to
whether the youngsters at that lev-
el are capable."
However, Sen. Schweigert noted
that if the school board felt that
they could teach such a course
with competent teachers and text-
books, "they ought to offer it."
Dipping into the future, he com-
mented that the possibilities of
reintroduction of the comparative
government bill are high, although
no such action has been taken yet.,
New Textbooks
Similar interest has been shown,
in the publishing world where new4
textbooks on communism or revis-
ed texts dealing with communism
are now coming out. In recent7
months, books on the history of,
the Communist movement, the,
philosophy of Karl Marx, Vladi-
mir I. Lenin and Josef Stalin, the
history of the Soviet Union and
comparative government have ap-1
peared; both as texts and paper-
back books.
Last semester the Michigan re-,
gion of the National Council of
the Social Studies held a meeting,
at the University to discuss the,
topic. Although only approximately
100 persons were expected, about
500 teachers came, Prof. Stanley,
Dimond of the education school
noted. This, of course, shows the
increasing interest in the field.
The National Council of the So-
cial Studies has yet to take a stand
on the issue although in previous
publications, it has supported ther
student's right to learn about con-
troversial issues.
Major Block
The major stumbling block to
this type of course or even unit
comes from the same public which
in so many areas is pushing for
such teaching. As Sen. Schweigert
pointed out, often students go
home and discuss what they are
bein gtaught in school. "If they
are learning communism it often
puts the teacher in a bad spot."
More and more, however, the
schools are looking for ways to
teach about communism to stu-
dents. In more schools than not,
the systems are initiating or
thinking of initiating some sort of
instruction in the field. New text-
books in world history are dealing
more with Russia and the 1918
revolution and the effect of com-
munism on Asia and Africa than
older books did.
The University course, Philoso-
phy 263, dealing with the philos-
ophies of communism, fascism and
democracy, is both a reflection
and a leader of the trend. It
doesn't appear that the high school
student will gradute for much
longer without a course or in-
struction in communism.

By BARBARA LAZARUS

4>

The 12th series of William W.
Cook Lectures on American Insti-
tutions will feature Prof. Adolf A.
Berle of Columbia University,
speaking on "The American Eco-
nomic Republic."
The lecture series will be held
at 4:15 p.m. each day on Feb. 11-
14 in Rackham Aud.
Prof. Berle will speak on the
emergence of a twentieth century
political-economical ideology, the
change conception of property, the
"free market," t capital and pri-
vate enterprise in his first lecture
on Feb.11.
His next two lectures will deal
with an outline of the constitu-
tional and legal bases of current
organization. He will discuss fed-
eral assumption of responsibility,
the President and the Council of
Economic Advisers, the functions
of the Federal Reserve Board and
the fiscal policy function of the
President.
On Feb. 13 Prof. Berle will in-
clude discussion of the economic
republic and the "so-called free
market sector," corporation pro-
duction concentration, the system
of "oligopoly" and assumption of
responsibility by the federal gov-
ernment in fields still uninstitu-
tionalized.
The concluding lecture will offer
a review of institutionalizing a
minimum standard of lIi v i n g
through welfare legislation..
Prof. Berle's career has includ-
ed serving as United States dele-
gate to the Inter-American Con-
ference for the Maintenance of
Peace in 1936-37, assistant secre-
tary of state 1938-44 and, ambassa-
dor to Brazil 1945-46. Prof. Berle
continues to serve as a special
consultant to the secretary of.
state.
The William Cook Lectures were
established by William Wilson
Cook so that the University could
make a major contribution to
study, teaching and dissemination
of precepts concerning the Ameri-
can way of life. He also donated
the William W. Cook Law Quad-
rangle and the Martha Cook Bldg.
We of
MARILYN MARK'S
welcome y7u to use
the facilities of our
BEAUTY SALON

Prof. David G. Dickenson of the
Medical School will direct a two-j
year study on the best methods
of developing and using a maximal
care facility for ambulatory pa-
tients to be built at the Medical
Center, Dean William N. Hubbard
of the Medical School announced
yesterday.
The unit which will contain
some of the most comprehensive
outpatient treatment facilities will
be planned by Prof. Dickenson
under a $58,000 W. K. Kellogg
Foundation grant given to the
University last December.
It will house approximately 200
patients who are capable of help-
ing themselves and who do not
need hospitalization.
Varied Rooms
Facilities will include physi-
cians' consulting rooms, examining
rooms and special treatment
rooms as well as "pleasant rooms
for patients and relatives," he
noted.

"Recreational facilities will be
provided and patients will have a
high degree of personal freedom.
Prescribed routines will be held to
the minimum required to meet
the patients' treatment needs," he
added.
The new facility, Prof. Dicken-
son declared, "will provide a tran-
sition period between hospital and
home for the convalescent patient,
during which he can be encourag-
ed to assume increasing respon-
s.,ility for his own care and still
receive expert assistance when he
needs it."
Outpatient Housing
It will also provide housing for
outpatients whose entire diagnosis
and treatment can be accomplish-
ed without hospitalization. The
facility will thus .release beds in
the general hospital for seriously
ill patients.
Citing the. facilities' teaChing
potential, Prof. Dickenson assert-

ed that he "expects this kind
unit to become the pattern
progressive medical care in cc
munities; therefore, medical
dents, physicians in train
therapists, nurses and others
the health care team should
corporate in their training exj
ience in such a setting. They t
,should be able to apply it in tl
own communities with gre
skill and understanding."
No specific site has been sel
ed for the facility.
Save 20%T on Book~
with S..X.
Basement of S.A.B.
February 2-7
12 to 5 P.M.
STUDENT BOOK
EXCHANGE

A. A. BERLE
..-,.economic republic

J

HUMANITIES:
Two Receive
Council Gifts
For Research.
Professors John Arthos of the
English department and Harold
E. Wethey of the history of art
department, have been awarded
grants from the American Council
of Learned Societies for postdoc-
toral research in the humanities
and related social sciences.
Prof. Arthos will study "Changes
in Forms of Literary Expression in
England in the Renaissance," and
Prof. Wethey will do research on
"Titian and his Atelier: Mono-
graph and Catalogue Raisonne."
under the auspices of the society.
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