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February 01, 1963 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAILY

ies See Game Films

547 COMPETITORS:
Indoor Track Season Opens

Wrestlers on Road
'For Big Ten Opene

(A)--Big Ten foot-
ave finished review-
sion of "The Great
y"-film clips of pos-
ng errors last fall.
't change a single

ommissioner William R. Reed,
sat in with coaches Tuesday
they displayed game movies
back their gripes against
erse whistle-blowing, finally,
ke the silence of the Little
ater movement Thursday.
No Action Yet
Nothing formal has been put
paper yet," said Reed. "What-
- may be reported on officiat-
blunders will be done at the
ch meeting of the athletic di-
ors March 7-8 in Chicago.
The film reviews generally
e indicative of the thing we
w existed. Over a football sea-
you probably can find 200 to
plays involving officiating
rsight or errors. But bear' in
d this is related to more than
0 plays.
Furthermore, I'd say about
ee-quarters of officiating er-
-broughtto our attention were,
miscalls, but failures to see
ething wrong.
Sins of Omission
[ would say that officiating
of omission comprise about
per cent of the faults cited."
eed stressed that the coaches
dly didn't dwell on judgment
s-except perhaps On pass in-
erence which is a real tough
in most instances."
he commissioner said some

film extracts from the hectic Min-
nesota-Wisconsin finale which
gave the title to Wisconsin 14-9
were shown to the coaches. In
this Nov. 24 game at Madison,
Wis., Minnesota incurred succes-
sive 15-yard penalties with time
running out, greatly aiding Wis-
consin's winning touchdown drive.'
No Special Attention
"This did not receive any more
attention than other games," as-
serted Reed.
"Overall, the situation isn't so
serious," said Reed. "We're just
trying to improve on what we got.
We know what we got is not per-
feet, but by no means is there
chaos,"
Reed said the film showing by
th'e coaches as a group is not plan-
ned as an annual winter event,
unless the coaches want it.
"The camera gives you the best

game record you can have," said
the commissioner. "I'm a firm be-
liever in using it constructively.
We can use films to help officials
greatly, not as a critical device
necessarily.
"For instance, ordinarily an of-
ficial may not see a holding situ-
ation 15 times in a season. Films
can help an official identify hold-
ing more readily.
"The same thing with piling-on.
I felt there was a great deal more
emphasis calling the piling-on foul
last season-but we dictated that
in line with the collegiate rules
committee recommendation."
The ten football coaches and
Reed met in the auditorium at
Northwestern University for al-
most five hours. Coach Bump El-
liott attended the meeting but like
the other coaches had no com-
ment.

By STAN KUKLA

Tomorrow afternoon and eve-
ning will see 547 trackmen from
some 15 universities, colleges and
junior colleges, four track clubs
and nine high school relay teams
competing for honors in the open-
ing meet of Michigan's indoor
track season.
The Wolverines will host the
event, beginning at one in the
afternoon, being held in Yost
Field House. At 1 p.m. the broad
jump finals will be held along
with qualifying heats and novice
races. Then at 6:30, the pole
vaulters and high jumpers will
begin their events.
The finals in the running
events start at 7:15 with a shuttle-
hurdle relay. Another feature
event of the evening will be a
two-mile relay.

In the broad jump Doug Niles
and Charles Peltz are among the
Wolverine entries who will try to
stave off the challenges of such
formidable opponents as Sherman
Lewis and Bob Moreland of Mich-
igan State.-
Other field events include the
pole vault, with former Michigan'
star Rod Denhart f vored. Den-j
hart set the outdoor pole vault'
record in the Big Ten meet last
spring when he soared over 15
feet. Several weeks ago he broke
the 15-foot barrier in an indoor

meet in Toronto and
repeat the feat before
fans.

hopes to
Wolverine

Track Truce Suffers Breach

4'

NEW YORK WA) -- Representa-
tives of the Amateur Athletic
Union and the college-supported
U.S. Track and Field Federation
will meet here today in an effort
to patch up a crack in the new
peace pact between the two big
sports bodies.
The main issue involves the
matter of dual sanctioning-is it
or isn't it to be permitted?--
under the agreement reached two
weeks ago under the iron fist of
President Kennedy's special arbi-
trator, Gen. Douglas MacArthur.
If the two groups aren't able to
settle their differences, the matter
again may be thrown into the,
general's lap. That's what they
agreed to at the arbitration meet-
ings in MacArthur's suite.
The AAU, announcing the con-
ference between top men of both
bodies,. said the meeting was
merely a routine, one to draw up
the articles of alliance.
"This was decided at the Mac-
Arthur sessions," an AAU spokes-
man said. "We are implementing
decisions made at that time. This
is not, as has been said, a meet-
ing of the special 6-man Olympic
Council(the , -trouble shooting
agency) ."
The new AAU-NCAA armistice
suffered a break recently when
the U.S Track and Field Federa-
tion requested dual sanctioning, of
the AAU-backed Boston A.A.
track and field meet, staged last
Saturday night.
The Boston A.A. director, Col.
Will Cloney, said he neither ac-
cepted nor rejected the USTFF

bid. He said he notified the
USTFF that the AAU insisted that
such dual sanctioning would jeo-
pardize the international eligibil-
ity of all the competing athletes.
The AAU insists that the agree-
ment reached at the MacArthur
arbitration meetings clearly spe-
cified that the AAU should be the
official sanctioning agent for all
meets of an open category-that
is, involving athletes both in and
out of school-whereas the USTFF
was instructed to stick strictly to
undergraduates or post graduates
still in school.
The USTFF argues that since

it was designated as the govern-
ing body for enrolled students it
has the right to determine where
and when these students can com-
pete--equivalent to dual sanction-
ing.
That's what the boys are scrap-
ping about now.
The AAU will be represented
at the meetings by Louis J. Fisher
of High Point, N. C., the presi-
dent; director Don Hull and coun-
sellor Pinky Sober. The USTFF
contingent will be headed by Wil-
liam F. Russell of Inglewood,
Calif., the president of the new
federation.

Highly regarded shot putter
George Puce faces stern competi-
tion in his event. Throwing
against him is teammate Roger
Schmitt, who placed second in the
Big Ten outdoor meet last year,
Don Smith of Purdue, Gene Pasi-
nen of Wayne State, Dave Mutch-
ler of Michigan State, and Wol-
verine discus-man Ernst "K"
Soudek.
Thetwo-mile relay team for the
Wolverines is composed of Dorr
Casto, Ted Kelly, Dan Hughes and
Chuck Aquino, the team captain.
Aquino will also run one leg of
the distance medley relay. Carter
Reese. Jay Sampson, Dave Ro-
main, and Peltz will be running in
the sprint medley.
A look at the mile run shows
the top-flight trackmen that are
competing. The field includes
Gord Morley, a former state high
school mile champ, of Central
Michigan; Mike Gallagher, from
Western Michigan though he is
running unattached; Des Ryan, a

Michigan sophomore who hails
from Dublin, Ireland; Bill Heller
of Ohio University and Steve
Price and Tom Godfrey of Miami.
All of these runners have done
the indoor mile under 4:20.
Kent Bernard and Jim Nea-
husan, both of Michigan, face the
challenge of such greats as Terryle
Sneed of Purdue, Jack Wright of
Western Michigan, and Jim Zet-
tlemeyer of Ohio University in the
600-yd. sprint.
In the high jump, Al Washing-
ton of Flint Northern High School
will be competing against Steve
Williams of Michigan and Wilmer
Johnson of Michigan State. Wil-
liams has reached 6'9", Johnson
6'8", and Washington 6'6".
Raimey Signs
In Canada
Dave Raimey, one of the few
bright spots on the Michigan grid-
iron last fall, has signed a con-
tract to play with the Winnipeg
Blue Bombers, current champions
of the Canadian football league.
Raimey led the Maize and Blue,
in scoring all three years in spite
of being handicapped by shoulder
injuries this past season. He de-
cided to undergo corrective sur-
gery, which ruled out his partici-
pation in track this spring.
He was often mentioned as an
All-American candidate before last
football season opened. But the
injury sustained in one of the
first games of the year hampered
his performance and any chance
of the honor was lost.

By JIM BERGER
The Michigan wrestling team
begins the spring semester with
two away meets.
Tomorrow the Wolverines will
take on the highly rated Minne-
sota Gophers and Monday they
will be against the Purdue Boiler-
makers.
The Wolverines will be out to
continue their unblemished Big
Ten record. Against Northwest-
ern, Michigan won an impressive,
18-10 decision.
Minnesota was rated by Mich-
igan coach Cliff Keen as being
among the best in the conference
this season. Northwestern defeat-
ed the Gophers, however.
Keen has planned a few minor
changes in his lineup. Nick Arme-
lagos, Michigan's captain, returns,
to the 130-lb. weight. Armelagos

EVERYTHING FOR THE ATHLETE
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iNDIVIDUAL SPORTS
Walk a few blocks and $ave
STEIN & GOETZ Sporting Goot
"YOUR FRIENDLY DEALERS"
315 South Main Street - Downtown

will replace Bill Jones who
led against Northwestern.
has been ill for several day
should be ready for action so
Jim Keen will .restle at
lbs. against Purdue. Mich
regular 157-pounder Wayne
will wrestle tomorrow a
Minnesota. At heavyweight
Spaly will wrestle against P
and Jack Barden, Michigan'
ular heavyweight, will go aE
Minnesota.
Elsewhere, Michigan's orde
be the same. Carl Rhodes
wrestle at 123; Dave Dozema
go at 137; Lee Dietrick will
147; Rick Bay at 167, and
Stowell will go at 177.
After these two away mee
Wolverines return home for
straight Big Ten dual meets
first will be against OSU.

NATION'S TOP TWO TEAMS:
Cincinnati Tops Drake in Overtime;
Loyola Romps to 19th Straight Win

.sa....~

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SINerrI

Open daily 9 to 5:30
Monday till 8:30

BUMP ELLIOTT
. . attends meeting

SPECIAL WINTER

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI-Top-ranked Cin-
cinnati survived a scare from
eight-time beaten Drake last night,
edging the Bulldogs 65-60 in over-
time as sophomore Gene Smith
hit the clinching basket after miss-
ing three free throws.
It was the Bearcats' 34th
straight victory-their 16th this
season:
It was the toughest game so far
this year for Cincinnati, which
earlier had scored a six-point vic-
tory over Bradley and a seven-
point triumph over Dayton.
The Bearcats, National Collegi-
ate champions the last' two years,
fell three points behind in the sec-
ond half but forged into the over-
time with 2:17 left on two free
throws by Tom Thacker:.
Thacker had a free throw with
5 seconds to go but missed the
attempt, and then missed a jump
shot after grabbing his own re-
bound.
Scoring honors for the night
went to Gene West of Drake, who
had 21 points. George Wilson
scored 20 points for the Bearcats,,
now 5-0 in the Missouri Valley
Conference.
CHICAGO - Loyola's second-
ranked Ramblers walloped Wash-
ington- of St. Louis 118-58 last
night for their 19th straight bas-
ketball victory.
It was the ninth time this year
that the nation's top scoring team
had passed the 100-point mark. It
1

also was the second highest total
the Chicago outfit has scored.
The Ramblers defeated Western
Michigan 123-102 earlier in the
season.
Loyola Coach George Ireland
left the floor before the game
started under doctor's orders and
listened to it on radio in the lock-
erroom. He was suffering from a
virus infection and had a tempera-
ture of 103 degrees.
Les Hunter and Vic Rouse each
scored 12 points in the first half
as Loyola took a 51-27 lead. The
advantage knocked Washington .

completely out of the game and
the Ramblers padded out the mar-
gin as Jerry Harkness made 16 of
his 18 points after intermission and
Ron Miller added 11 of his total
12.
Hunter wound up with 22 points
and Rouse 15.
Loyola used 11 players with six
hitting in double figures including
John Egan, with 15, and Billy
Smith, with 14.
Sandy Pomerantz led the Bears
with 19 points while Ron Jones
added 15. Washington now has a
9-6 record.

TYPICAL EXAMPLES

Hawks Swamp Bruins, 9-2;
Leafs Edge Canadiens, 6-3

I

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11

By The Associated Press
BOSTON - Ailing Bobby Hull
and Stan Mikita each produced
three goals for Chicago as the
National Hockey League leading
Blackhawks built up a 5-0 opening
period lead and crushed Boston
9-2 last night.
The team total tied the season's
high set by New York when the
Rangers beat the Bruins 9-3, Dec.
27.
Hull added two assists to his
brilliant effort while Red Hray
contributed one goal and aided on
four other scores.
Coach Rudy Pilous hadn't de-
cided if Hull would play at all un-
til the opening face off.
The blond ace returned to the
line-up sooner than expected aft-
er he had suffered a severe leg
bruise last Saturday against De-
troit. At first his violent collision
with a goal post had appeared to
have resulted in a broken leg.
MONTREAL - Veteran Red
Kelly scored three goals and set
up George Armstrong's tie-break-

ing shot as the Toronto Maple
Leafs stormed from behind for a
6-3 National Hockey League vic-
tory over the Montreal Canadiens.
The victory lifted Toronto into
sole possession of second place in
the NHL, two points behind
league-leading Chicago. Toronto
and Montreal had shared second
place before the game.
Behind 2-0, the Maple Leafs
drew even on Kelly's first two
goals, then took command with
four counters in the third period.
Armstrong broke the 2-2 tie at
1:34 of the period on an assist
from Kelly. Dick Duff made it 4-2,
Kelly 5-2 with his hat trick on a
penalty shot, and Frank Mahov-
lich 6-2 before Bobby Rousseau of
Montreal got the final goal of the
game.
Montreal's other scorers were
Dickie Moore and Gilles Trem-
blay.
NBA RESULTS
Chicago 116, New York 101
Syracuse 112, St. Louis 10
Boston 128, Cincinnati 125
Los Angeles 127, Detroit 122

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