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February 17, 1963 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-17

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7,98 t6

r. 963TE MICHIGAN DAILY

am Contemplates
tudy of Resources
B. 'E'7~ S TEE HALLE T

CATALOG CRISIS:
'U' Library Retains Book Backlog

PAGEl

The natural resources report
given to President John F. Ken-
nedy by the National Academy of
Sciences-National Research Coun-
cil recently brought a statement
of agreement in principle from
Prof. Stanley A. Cain of the na-
tural resources school. {'
The report finds that "unless
there is a sudden denial of access
to world markets, the United
States need fear no serious cur-
tailment of growth because of
natural resources over the next
few decades."
It adds that the consequences'
will be serious if "a basically new.
prientation and organization" of
our natural resources research and
development effort is not adopted
to meet "the world-wide challenge
of burgeoning populations.",
Cites Abundance
The report cites the abundance
of natural resources in America,
today as "derived in a large part
from research," and urges a shift
in philosophy from "the cautious
husbanding of scarcities to the
wise management of plenty."
Prof. Cain acknowledged the
fact that rapidly increasing popu-
lations, both in the United States}
and elsewhere, present scientists
with a problem of how most eff-
fectively to use existing resources.
He added, however, that the pros-
pects today are neither as bad
or as good as the report to Ken-
nedy would immediately indicate.
On the one hand, the problem of
there not being enough resources
to go around is not as acute as
the reader of the report might
suppose; on the other, the advan-
tages gained from research are
limited in their benefits.
Technical Advances
Prof. Cain explained that tech-
nical advances 'have indeed al-
lowed for an increase in the ef-
fectiveness of our use of natural
resources in many ways; among
which have been the discovery of
better raw materials and the more
effective management of resources
in general.
He noted, however, that the
difficulty lies in the inability of
some groups of . people, both
abroad and in some regions of our
own country, to put such technical
advantages to effective use.''There
must be created a better organiza-
tion of the population in such
areas for better benefits of goods
and services," Prof. Cain observed.
Referring to the report's sug-
gestion that a special department
of natural resources be set up,
which would apparently exist con-
currently with the existing De-
partment of the -Interior, Agricul-
ture, and others, Prof. Cain noted
that the idea of"- calling for co-'
ordination of efforts toward . a
common goal is a .good one, uut
added that it would not be a

feasible undertaking for one new
separate department.
True Statement
Commenting on the report's
statement to the effect that the
effects which man's research ul-
timately has upon the total ei-
vironment in the field of natural
resources are "but dimly per-
ceived and not at all well under-
stood," Prof. Cain remarked that
there was much truth to this.
Prof. Cain took exception to the
report's implication that "we
should not continue to tamrer
with environment "until we have
looked into the matter more
thoroughly, however, saying tl.at
"everything we do changes the
nature of environment in some
way."
As far as the report's initial
claim as "a basically new orien-
tation" to the situation is con-
cerned, that statement is miS-
leading, Prof. Cain said. "Such a
claim is only justified by the re-
port's increasing emphasis on re-
search and its efforts toward co-
ordination," he added.
"The 'problem of natural re-
sources is more complicated than
the language of the Counc'l's re-
port to President Kennedy would
indicate," Prof. Cain concluded.

By BURTON MICHAELS
Because the 'University Library
"can buy more books than it can
catalog," it has a backlog of
volumes either not available or
only partially available to the pub-
lic, according to Asst. Director of
Libraries R. C. Stewart.
It buys these books because "the
most important thing is to acquire
materials when they are avail-
able," Miss Margaret Ayrault,
head of cataloging, said recently.
Stewart added that the libraries
must "try to respond to every con-
ceivable question put to it."
The libraries cannot catalog all
of its nearly 100,000 yearly ac-
quisitions because o the added
pressure put on it by changing
teaching methods and by entry
into heretofore uncovered fields,
because of the shortage of libra-
rians qualified to catalog highly
specialized works, and because of
a shortage of funds. +
Increased Pressures
"The change in teaching meth-
ods from the use of one text to
reference to many titles has in-
creased pressure on the libraries
to provide enough materials to
maintain a steady ratio of reserve
books to students using them,"
Miss Ayrault said.
She then cited a demand ,last'
fall to process 3100 added copies
of reserve books for classes using

these new teaching methods, libraries now "are considering
whereas in the entire fiscal year partial cataloging consisting of
ending in June, 1962, the libraries just the main entry, without com-
processed only 5,821 added copies. plex classification or subject
"A crisis like this delays us from headings," Miss Ayrault said. This
handling other new acquisitions," already is being done at the Uni-
she said. versities of California and at the
Expanding interests also in- University of Kansas.
crease the backlog. Under Public But according to Stewart the
Law 480 the government has es- trouble with these "temporary
tablished centralized procurement records" is that "the libraries will
centers in Egypt, India and Paki- hesitate to make a temporary
stan to buy Arabic and Indic record if a permanent one is in
works, which the Library of Con- the offing, especially as tempor-
gress catalogs for all participating aryrecords often costrhalf as
libraries, much as a permanent record."
Intentional Retention

HELP WANTED
ENTERTAINMENT WANTED - Folk-
singers, bands, combas, vocal groups,
any kind of entertainment NO 5-
6719, evenings. H6
MAKE QUICK MONEY during registra-
tion. Sell The Michigan Daily. Pay-
ment by commission. Call the circu-
lation department at NO 23-24-1 be-
tween 1-3 any day. H52
HULL DEVELOPMENT needs plastics
lab tech. 2nd sem. Jr. or above in
Chem. or chem. engin. 20 hrs/wk at
1.65/hr. Work schedule flexible. Call
NO 3-3939 between 3-5 p.m. H2
MISCELLANEOUS

Kelman, atz To View
Popular Nation Concept

Since the centralized cataloging
proves cheaper and easier, the li-
braries "intentionally" hold these
books uncataloged until the Li-
brary of Congress cataloging ar-
rives, unless a need for a book is
seen earlier.
Besidesthe national program,
the libraries work with the 'area
centers, who receive funds fronm
foundations and the government,
to acquire foreign books. It sent
to the Middle East last spring a
representative -who obtained 2600-
3000 volumes in Near Eastern
languages. Doubling of book funds
for Slavic studies netted 4-5000
titles in less than two weeks.
Cataloging scholarly works like
those acquired for the area cen-
ters requires trained specialists,
who are in short supply. The mus-
icologist who left the Stellfeld
collection half uncataloged has
not been replaced, and the collec-
tion is only partially recorded. A
graduate in history hashtmade a
partial bibliography of the Myers
Nazi collection.
Library Schools
The shortage of librarians is
such that "the annual output of
the nation's library schools could
be absorbed by large university
libraries or by the 12 largest pub-
lic libraries alone," Miss Ayrault
said,
The increased complexity of
cataloging aggravates the prob-
lem. Whereas foreign proper
names used to be translated, a
more scholarly and more taxing
transliteration is used today. With
more books in more subjects, the'
libraries find it more time-con-
suming to assign reasonable rela-
tionships to its collections.
Financial difficulties also pre-
sent themselves. It often costs
more to catalog and shelve books
than to buy them, especially in
new foreign areas where books
are cheaper to buy but more ex-
pensive to catalog than English
publications.
To alleviate the backlog, the

Ryder Asks
Clarification
Of Seniority
A call for clarification of the
status of employe seniority in
cases of plant relocation was
sounded here recently by Prof.
Meyer S. Ryder of the business ad-
ministration school.
Addressing the midwinter per-
sonnel conference of the American
Management Association, Prof.
Ryder declared. that the time is
approaching for "some new law
. stemming from the terms of
employment inscribed in collec-
tive bargaining agreements.
to the problem of plant relocation.
Firm direction from the courts
would also be helpful, Prof. Ryder
said. He added that there are
cases currently in the courts which
seek to determine whether or not
an employee has a claim to a job'
which entitles him to that job
even if the plant in which he'
works should be moved to another
city or state.
Until the United States Su-
preme Court "is willing to con-
sider reflect and then speak on
what seniority in its applied sense
fully means this whole area in
a legal and industrial relations"
sense is a messy, uncertain one,"
Prof. Ryder said.
If management is considering
changing the location of a plant,
it should be prepared to face
problems involving "human" ques-
tions such as personnel and.
management-union considerations,
the employer's rights versus those
of the employe, and the employer's
obligations to his employes in the
new location, Prof.' Ryder con-
cluded.

By BARBARA LAZARUS
This spring Professors Herbert
Kelman and Daniel Katz of the
psychology department, are direct-
ing a {small pilot project, spon-
sored by the Conflict Resolution
Center, to study how people define
their national role and relation-
ship to the, nation.
"We are interested in devefop-
ing a general framework for look-
ing at such things as the national
role, the relat'onship of the .in-
dividual to the national state, the
content of his picture of the na-
tion and the kind of ideology
which develops around the na-
tion's role in international af-
fairs," Prof. Kelman said recently.
Another' part of the study will
view the national state as a sys-.
tem with its own set of require-
ments, he explained.
Leadership Patterns
"One can look at the functions
of the ,state independently of the
individual by examining leader-
ship patterns, basic documents
which the state 'uses and types of
expectations of the nation as a
system that are communicated
to its citizens.'"
The study will interview indi-
viduals from different strata of
society to see how they define

All roads lead to
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Food
Specialties
Kitchen Utensils
Open every night till Midnight

II

their national role. It will then
relate this information to their
background and to specific views
on foreign policy, Prof. Kelman
explained.
The program is basically ex-
ploratory, partly an attempt to
try out methods and partly to get
some concrete material to help us
define relevant dimensions more
clearly, he said.
Explore Possibilities
"We also want to see people's
attitudes to various kinds of in-
ternational -activity and to ex-
plore possibilities of linking in-
ternational involvement to the,
national role.",
Prof. Kelman said that there
is no inherent incompatability be-
tween national and international
involvement.
"One can be a .good' citizen of
his country ;and still be active in
world or supra-national activities.
These can be complementary loy-
alties rather than competing ones,
and the extent to which it will be
possible to maintain them togeth-
er willdepend on how 'they are
defined."
Scandinavian Students'
Two other projects Prof. Kel-
man started before this project
are also related to the national
role. One is a study of Scandinav-
ian students, who spent a year in
the United States, and explores
how this experience affected their
self-images, including their na-
tional image.
"The other project is an evalua-
tion bf a specific multi-national
activity. It concentrates on i a
group of broadcasters from 16
countries, who came to the United
States for four months and is
trying to evaluate the effective-
ness of this kind of experience."
Prof. Kelman said that he was
also interested in the concept of
an international military force.
"To accomplish this, one would
have to be creative in structuring
the military force in such a way
that it would allow multiple loyal-
ties to operate."
Vienna Professor
To Give Lectures
Professor Viktor Frankl of the
University of Vienna will speak on
"Man's Search for Meaning" on
Feb. 20 at 4 p.m. in Hill Aud.
Prof. Frankl will speak on
"Existence and Values" at 4 p.m.
on-Feb. 21 in Hill Aud. Both lec-
tures are sponsored by the Office
of Religious Affairs.

1
..:. i
~ ' °,
r

Epidemiology Deartent
Studies Respiratory Virunse~s

. 7.
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IA M
)e" slip in
cy nylon
ace melted ,
front and,
snd the back
/ Praine,
reme/Ecru,
ay Green, ' J
ru.
s 32 to 38
izes 32 to 5
{

By GAIL BLUlMBERG
Since 1941, the epidemiology de-
partment of the public health
school has been doing research on
respiratory viruses under the aus-
pices of the Commission of Influ-
enza of the Armed Forces Epi-
demiological Board.
Financial support comes from
the Office of the Surgeon General..
This grant has been renewed
again this year.
A part of the epidemiology de-
partment under the chairmanship
of Prof. Thomas Francis Jr. of
the public health school is now
working on the prevention, con-
trol and treatment of epidemic in-
fluenza.
Prof. Hunien F. Maassab of the
public health school has been
studying the biochemical com-
ponents ar4d the reactions in-
volved in viral infections. He has
demonstrated that purified nuc-
leic acid (RNA) can be isolated
from the virus and used, instead
of the virus, to induce infection in
susceptible cells. Maassab has also
been studying metabolic inhibitors
which block the pathways of viral
growth.
Prof. Fred. M. Davenport of the
public health school and the Med-
ical School has investigated the

pathogenesis of respiratory viral
diseases and the duratioon of im-
munity, following natural infec-
tion and vaccination. In collabor-
ation with Prof. Albert V. Hen-
nessy of the public health school
and the Medical School, he has
been studying the purification of
the essential immunizing compon-
ents of influenza virus in order
to reduce side effects and .stimu-
late a broader anti-body basis for
resistance.
Prof. Byron Berlin of the public
health school is investigating the
mechanism of action of a mineral
oil agent vaccine. He believes it
to be advantageous as it produces
higher, longer lasting, anti-body
levels. Such a vaccine requires
less virus, is thus cheaper, and
would enable many viruses to be
combined in one 'dose. Prof. Berlin
is also exploring the effect that
chronic exposure to x-ray has up-
on one's resistance to influenza
virus.
Elva Minuse of the public health
school has been surveying the in-
fluenza strains from all over the
world. If an influenza strain
changes, the vaccine in present
use would not be effective against
the new strain. Thus, it is im-
portant to keep a constant check
upon the changing strains.

NEED A BITE TO EAT?
Time for Sunday breakfast and
the kitchen is bare?
Dash to
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
We open at 8 Sunday morning.
BUSINESS SERVICES
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, med-
ical, legal, technical conferences,
mimeographing, offset. Quick, accu-
rate, experienced. Professional Serv-
ice Associates, 334 Catherine. J11
TYPING-Dissertation or thesis ready
for typing? For fast, accurate and
economical service by typists familiar
with graduate school requirements
contact Ann Arbor Typing and Print-
ing Service, 117 S. Main St., Ann
Arbor or call, 663-2587. J9
WANTED-Baby sitter Mon., Wed., Fri.
1:30-3:30. Call NO 5-7485. J1
JIM'S RADIO and TV, 619 Packard.
665,0359. Have your radios and Hi F's
fixed here. J3
FOR THE FINEST SELECTION of party
favors and unignie gifts contact Bud-
Mor Agency, 1103 S. University. NO
2-6362. 4
MANUSCRIPTS. TERM PAPERS typed,
Multilith Offset for reproduction,
photo copy, mailings. Gretinger's
Business Service, 320 S. Huron. HNT
2-0191. -8
PIANO INSTRUCTION.
Beginners and Advanced
DANIELA WEINBERG
Formerly: member, Columbia Chamber
Ensemble instructor, City College of
N.Y. Tel. 662-2821. J29
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to Purdue, Feb. 22
and return Feb. 24. Phone NO 3-7541,
Ext. 302. G18
THREE GIRLS want ride to Chicago
weekend of March 2. Can leave any
time, after 4 on March 1. Call Judy
at NO 2-2011. G17
CO-EDS! GIVE US YOUR EAR!
Planning a trip to the sunny south
yet feel that a Florida tan is hardly
worth antcramped and dull ridewin
some antiquated jalopy filled with
undergraduate small talk? .We have
what you're searching for. A guar-
anteed, swift, pleasant, spacious ride
in a new T-Bird,rleavingApril third.
For pennies more you can go 'fist
class. Interview by appointment: 140
8-6918. 016
Drive Yourself.
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes,
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
59 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
WANTED TO RENT
GARAGE WANTED
Vicinity of Canterbury Rd. Ann Arbor
Woods., John Allen School or 'South-
east Ann Arbor area. Phone NO 5-9429
after 5 p.m. 1
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOMS FOR GRAD Women near cam-
pus, limited cooking. 1029 Vaughn
St., one house off E. Univ. From 8-5
call NO 3-1511, Ext. 2461, after 5:30
Sat, and Sun. NO 3-1619 El
MUSICAL MDSE.
RADIOS, REPAIRS
GUITARS, ETC.
Make, Repair, Buy and Sell
Private and Group Instruction
Hoots Daily
Herb David Guitar Studio
209 S. STATE
NO 5-8001 X5
FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY on
radios, phonos, tape recorders and
TVs with this ad. Campus Radio &
TV, 325 E. Hoover. X9
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan

PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR.
119 W. Washington
BARGAIN CORNER

FOR SALE
CAREFULLY, hardly used Royal type-
I writer. $50. Call 3-7541, Ext. 311. B14
WANTED-Scuba gear. Call Bob, 5-4111,
Ext. 540. B16{
WOMAN'S SKI BOOTS-Excellent con-
dition, $15. Size 8. NO 5-3486. 834
WOMEN'S Swiss made after-ski and ski
pants. Size 10. Also evening dress, un-
worn. Size 11. Call NO 3-7273. B15
GIBSON SOLID body guitar, $390 new.
Asking $175. NO 8-6166 after 7:00.
B13
FOR SALE - Ski parka, hair dryer,
skirts, slacks, sweaters, etc. Call 6442
Markley. B36
FOR SALE-English bike, good condi.
tion, light, basket. $15. Call Ellie, NO
2-3159. B31
FOR SALE - Smith-Corona portable2
typewriter. Like new. Call Judy Bleir
at -NO 2-2591. 33
HOUSEHOLD .FURNITURE
Rugs, beds, and miscellaneous. P.
NO 5-0393. B37
DIAMONDS at rock bottom prices
through student representative of
large Detroit Jewelry Store. Call 663-
7194. B7
LARGE, HEAVY-DUTY wooden tables,
suitanle for housing unit dining or
private work tables. Call Don Mac-
Ritchae, 5-9193. B21I
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Red leather manicure kit. Has
value to owner. Lost on Forest Ave.
Cali NO 3-1561, Ext. 339. A27
LOST IN THE UGLI-Man's ring, black
star sapphire, set in white gold band
with diamond chips. Reward. Call
Stan, NO 2-6852. A26
USED CARS
'55 2-DR. CHEV. Good clean car, stand-
ard trans. $325. HU 2-9425..
'59 PLYMOUTH 9-passenger station wa-
gon, clean, guaranteed, factory re-
built engine. $895. Call HU 2-1672.N16
'61 CORVETTE soft top, red and white.
230-3 speed. New tires, one owner.
23,000 miles. $2,950. Call 663-3452. N1
1955 PONTIAC funeral director's.hearse,
power steering and brakes, automatic,
white sidewalls. Black and white.* Call
c%llect, Mr. Jay Bradmon, care of
Bill Lee' Oldsmobile Co., HOward 5-
0456.
*Ideal for fishing and camping trips.I
N15
PERSONAL
FOREIGN GRAD student wou d like to
meet nice American girl. Write phone!
number and name. P.O. Box 128 Ann
Arbor. P49
GETTING MARRIED? Consult the doc-
tors, nurses, marriage counselors of
planned parenthood about birth con--
trol and family spacing. An Arbor
clinic hours: Tuesday afternoon by
appointment, Tues. Thurs. 7:30 to
9:00 p.m. Call NO 2-9282 for addi-
tional information. Clinic is located
at 201 East Liberty. F
TO DARLING DAVID and the men (Or
so they call themselves) of ota
Lambda Chi: Nothing to crush. That's
the point. Respectfully,
The Exec, Council of FCC F55
FRED,I warned you and now you are
going to get it in black and white.
I'll send the bottle right over to
your apt. KODAK
fleetingly, ch. 54
I THINK I have taken just about
enuflf kidding about that spiffy green
sweater., Beware or I will,strike with
my magic marker. Fecklessly, ch. F53
ONCE UPON A TIME there was a
small town in Massac usetts, which
being the site of Fithburg State
Teachers College. was named Fitch-
burg. This thriving city sunk into
the Fitchburg River last week, but
all the tenanders and salamanders
escaped. F52
AND HAST THOU slain the Michimuck
Come safe from harms, my squetish
toy
Oh Honvokruss day! Whahoo '
whalay!
He chortled on his boy. F46
"HAVE A Tenander, welcome aboard,"
Michael.
Watch out though, they explode. F50
IT IS INDEED A sour world. Where is
the answer 'sour? P51
MEMO NO. 2 to RK from RKS: Is this
thebest of all possible worlds, and
is this the best of all possible Theta
Mu Deltas, if the best of all possible
Flatbush real people cannot find an-
other solution security vanishes. DE
GUSTIBUS NON EST DISPUTANDEM.
:48
CAROL:

wilyu com wit2meto Detroit's
Cobo Arena Sat. Feb. 23 to dance with
Les Elgart? I can get a ticket at the
door at 9 p.m. for $4.50.
Dave F47
WANTED-Girl with gambling instinct
write Box 1561 Ann Arbor. P42
BILL, Tom, Scotty, and Jim-It's leg-
shaving tune for rush. F7
WANTED-Leader for scuba-diving ex-
pedition. Call Boca Raton. F6
LOST-A girl's gold Benrus wristwatch
in the vicinity of main campus. Call
NO 5-7711, Ext. 3312. P14
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORPORATION -
"Where marginal prices buy quality
diamonds!" 1209 S. University, 663-
7151. F43
CHRISTIAN ENTERPRISES
presents
THE DETROIT
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Valter Poole, conducting
with
JEROME H INES, basso
Monday, March 4-8:30 P.M.
Ford Auditorium
Tickets now on sale
65O Carnenter Rd. NO 8-9629

Come on out. Look around, have a
free tour of the beautiful Huron
Towers. Studios, one, two, three
bedrooms. Rents start at only $113
per month.

COME AND
SEE US
TODAY

-'JRON TO'.VERS
2200 FULLER ROAD
NO 3-0800
it A.M. to 6 P.M.
Sunday: Noon to 6 P.M.

C

FOR RENT
THIRD MAN wanted, to share nev
apartment. Call:,2-4866. a
UPPERCLASSMAN or grad to share api
with 3 men. $41 per month. Meals $
per week. Call Ron, NO 5-3789. Cli
FURNISHED HOUSE-Campus location
suitable for 4 or 5 students. $200 mc
Call NO 3-4062. C3
SINGLE OR DOUBLE Room, Hill & E
U. Linen changed, parking, $1
weekly. Call NO 5-8520. C
WANTED-3 men or 3 women student
to share furn. apt. $32/no. each. 41
High St., Ann Arbor. C1
FOR RENT for boys-2 single and
double. 902 Baldwin. Call: daytime-
3-3258; evening--5-6421. Cl:
2 MALE Grad. Students want 3rd Room
mate. One story house. NO 5-8264 o
NO 3-1511, Ext. 2323. Cl
ATTRACTIVE 3-room apt. Suitable fo
3. Near campus. Available Feb. 1
Call 3-2240. C2;
APARTMENT,,only 330 yds. from Angel
Hall; for 2, small, $100 per month
Call 665-6347. C11
WANTED-Girl to share my moder
3-bedroom home. I am a public healt
nurse. NO 3-6995 after 5:30, C!
MAN FOR APARTMENT on South Divi
sion; $42.00 complete. Call Mark a
2-8235 or 2-7759. I am on the Dali
staff., 01
CAMPUS LOCATION - 2 bedroom an
study furnished apt. Suitable for
students. $130 mo. Call NO 34062
2-MAN, FULL FURN., Air cond., bran
new, carpeted, $60 per man. No sum
mer lease! 927 E. Ann. Call: 663-841;
after 7:30 p.m. Available now. C
WANTED -- Male roommate for to
Danish modern apt. across at. fron
Bus. Ad. 2 blks, from campus. Cal
5-0579. C
ROOMMATE WANTED
Male-Senior or graduate student fo
apt, at corner of Oakland an
Church. Call NO 2-0189 between
and 7. Cl
PLAYMATE OR PLAYBOYS - Suble
furnished apt. in beautiful Huro
Towers next semester. Only $68 pe
month per person. Room for 2. Ca
NO 3-7287. Cl
MALE ROOMMATE Wanted to shar
a modern furnished apartment at a
excellent location. Includes air-con
ditioning, free off street parking
plus. 662-9401. Cl
A LIMITED number of efficiency an
1 bedroom apts. for married studeni
and faculty. Avail. for Feb. and Marc
assignments. For furtlier info. coi
tact University Apts. Office, 236
Bishop St., N. Campus, 662-3169. C

2 14-story towers overlooking Huron
River. Game Room, Swimming Pool.
Balconies and covered parking. Stu-
dio, 1, 2, 3-bedrooms. $113-312.
HURON TOWERS
2200 Fuller Road
NO 3-0800 NO 5-9162
C:
THREE BEDROOM unfurn. house wit
attached garage, x mile west of Dex
ter, Mich. Available to Univ. facul1
members only. Immediate occupanc
For further information contac
Univ. Apts. Office, 2364 Bishop St
N. Campus..-662-3169.' C
STUDENTS
Several apartments available to
share in campus area

APARTMENTS, LIMITED
NO 3-0511 Evenings
NO 5-9271

A "Beauty Shap
Rogers lushly la
tricot. Ban-Ion I
over the bodice
back. Lace arbo
slit hem.
White, Petal Pink
Cfreme de to Cr
Frosty Mint/Spr
Orange Blush/Ec
#4029 Short, size
at 6.00
44029 Averages
40 at 6.00
600

I.I

SPACIOUS ONE-BEDROOM
APARTMENT
Tiffany II, 731-735 Packard-Fall aj
plications now being taken for thee
unique accommodations. Each ap
encompasses two entire floors.
LIVING LEVEL: dining room,
living room, kitchen
SLEEPING LEVEL: spacious
bedroom, study, bath.
A decorative staircase provides pr
vate access between the two level
Call Mr. Skolnik (University Houi
ing Developers Inc.) at 3-8866 or Miu
Angel at 3-5096 for additional infor
mation. G

E
s
$ ":4j\.
4
A .
"+ .,.
t
t
Y {7
f!.
!
))
? 4ti. , C

PLOT FOR RIA)
ALL CLUES POINT TO THE
RETURN OF A CLASSIC.
The raincoat with an
air of foreign intrigue

ACT NOW

. . the bal'nacaan,
the trench coat. Here
just in time to save
the day ... . when it's

d~J,5k

Studios from $111.00
1-bedroom from $130.00
Bus transportation to campus
and Ann Arbor business district.
HURON TOWERS
NO 3-0800, NO 5-9162

11

1

C ("A AAIC T/-flIC I

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