100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 16, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

)

ussia Demands West
op Inspection Plan,
or Nuclear Test BRan
RTH TRY 'Ultimatum
olice Break Attempt Gives Offer

New Iraqi Regime
Promises Freedom
BAGHDAD (P)-Iraq's new regime promised yesterday to restore
freedom of operation to all political parties except those who resisted
its revolution-an obvious reference to the Communists.
Minister of State Hazem Jawad outlined at a news conference
the measures the revolutionary council intends to take to'clear away
leftovers of former Iraqi Premier Abdel Karim Kassem. Kassem was
overthrown a week ago and shot a day later. Jawad said supporters of
Kassem will be tried in public "ands

i

Opinions Vary on Youth Cops
By ELLEN SILVERMAN
President John F. Kennedy's
proposed three new youth corps
brought mixed reaction from Uni-
versity faculty members last night.
In regard to the proposed Youth
Conservation Corps, which would ' "
work in parks and fgrests and
build national roads, Prof. Lyle E.
Craine of the natural resources
school said, "there is certainly a
great amount of this kind of work
which needs to be done."
He noted that if the nation could
organize todothis sort of conser-
vation work, the benefits to the
future would be great. "There are
many areas which haven't had or-
ganized administration up to this
point.

P

To, Murder de Gaulle
PARIS (AP)-Military and police forces reported they broke up a
t to shoot down French President Charles -de Gaulle yesterday;
ested at least three military officers and a woman and launched a
mhunt across France for others.
The plot was to gun down de Gaulle with a high-powered rifle
ted with a telescopic sight when he visited historic L'Ecole Mili-
taire, a military school. Inform-
ants said de Gaulle was told of
the plot last night, the fourth
against his life in 17 months.
Subversives
A government communique said
three officers and a women were
being held on suspicion of "sub-
~.versive activities."
It reported a search for sus-
pects was being pressed into the
z night"hours and that documents
and arms had been found.
Moving before dawn, police and
;1t military units began rounding up
suspects. How many they seized
was not I nown.

~As Substitute
Speech to Conference
Brings Talks to Crisis
GENEVA (P)-The Soviet Union
yesterday forecast collapse of ne-
gotiations for a treaty to ban
nuclear testing unless the Western
powers abandon their concept of
effective enforcement.
Soviet First Deputy Foreign
Minister Vasily V. Kuznetsov de-
manded that the United States
and Britain accept the Russian of-
fer of two or three on-site inspec-
tions a year instead of the eight
to 10 the Western powers want.
The Soviet delegation leader
phrased his speech to the 17 na-
tion disarmament conference in
take-it-or-leave-it terms.
Western sources suggested pri-
vately that Kuznetsov's demand
brought the nuclear test ban talks
to the brink of failure after four
and one-half years of bargaining.
There was no indication that the
United States and Britain ever
would accept the Soviet demand.
The two already have cut their
on-site inspection requirements
down from 20.
Their present figure of eight to
10 seems to be their rock bottom
offer, or pretty close to it.
Kuznetsov maintained that Mos-
cow had made a tremendous con-
cession in agreeing to any.-

much better than in Kassem's
time." Kassem resorted to dramat-
ic public trials that sent many off
to summary execution.
Negotiations
Jawad said the new revolution-
ary government would enter into
negotiations with the Iraq Petro-
leum Co. if any changes are re-
quired in the present oil agree-
ments.
The Western-owned company
produces 90 per cent of Iraq's for-
eign exchange. Kassem broke off
negotiations with the company and
seized vast concessions from the
company where oil was not being
produced.
The minister said agrarian re-
form had been improperly car-
ried out under Kassem and that
the program would be revised.
Baghdad radio reported earlier
that several sheiks and feudal
landowners had been jailed for
violating land reform.
Reformers in Jail
The new military governor an-
nounced that several members of
the Agrarian Reform Ministry had
been arrested and indicated they
were Communists.
The regime is seeking a peace-
ful solution to the rebellion of
Kurdish tribesmen in mountainous
Northern Iraq, Jawad said. The
Kurds waged an 18-month war
against Kassem's forces. Kurdish
leaders have asked the new regime
for the same conditions they de-
manded from Kassem, self rule
within the republic.
Jawad denied reports that 5000
had been killed throughout the
country in the revolution and in
its wake, but gave no casualty fig-
ure.

Soviets Deny
Racial Bias{
VIENNA OP)-The Soviet Union
laid down a volley of denials yes-
terday as 17 angry Ghanaians ar-
rived by plane from Sofia, leading
a reported exodus of 500 disgust-
ed African students from Commu-
nist Bulgaria.
"We have been called black
monkeys and jungle people and we
were treated like dirt," said Rob-
ert Kotey, 25, one of the Ghana-
ians.
Charging racial discrimination
in Bulgaria against scholarship
students from 20 African nations,
Kotey told newsmen, "whoever
among us had leftist leaning has
been cured."
Other students are waiting for
transportation to leave Bulgaria.
The immediate cause for their
.departure was the arrest Monday
of seven leaders making up the
executive committee of the All-
African Students' Union in Sofia.
The Communists banned the,
Union and police and militia beat
up the students when they staged
a protest parade Tuesday.
But the cause lay deeper, the
students reported. For, during a
year of study, they 'said, they were
insulted on the streets and fed a
diet of Communist doctrine in the
classroom.
In Moscow, the news agency
Tass denied any mass exodus from
Bulgaria was in the making.
Blaming Western newspapers
and "certain big news agencies"
for spreading rumors, it quoted the
Bulgarian News Agency as saying
only 11 Ghanaian students had
left Bulgaria.

Fun Boom
"The need is greatest now that
we are in the midst of a 'recreation
boom'," he said.
Prof. Craine explained that with
a minimum amoufit of work such
as the building of hiking trails,
shelters and access roads many
areas could be opened for use of
the public.
The need for this type of work
is greater in the areas which are
not now under national park su-
pervision, he added. The untrained
worker could do much in these
areas with proper supervision..
Little Effect
Prof. Robert L. Carroll of the
sociology department noted that
the domestic peace corps, named
the National Service Corps, would
probably have little impact in ur-
ban areas.
"A corps of 5000 people (as
Kennedy proposed) will not pro-
vide a lot of occupations for men.
it would be a small drop in the
bucket," he said.
He noted that if this number of
corpsmen were spread out across
the country in many urban areas
the effect of the work done would
be small.
However, Prof. Carroll also not-
ed that the local or "hometown
youth corps," (Kennedy's third
proposal) could have some impact
if the idea caughtson locally. "This
would take young people from ,the
employable bracket and. provide
them with something to do," he
said.
'I Drip by Drip
Those employed in the corps
would trickle back to the labor
market at a slower rate. In this

PEACE CORPS-President John F. Kennedy's proposed domestic
peace corps, the National Service Corps, would perform similar
services in the United States as the present Peace Corps does
abroad. Peace Corps workers are shown here in Tanganyika.

CHARLES DE GAULLE
escapes again

Pick-Ups,
But interior ministry informants
said five were held and that oth-
ers were picked up, questioned, and
released.
In his speech at the military
school, de Gaulle said his atomic
striking force would be a contribu-
tion to allied efforts to hold West-
ern Europe.
He said if Europe were overrun,
the French striking force would
preserve a bridgehead for a re-
turn of allied forces.

way, the corps would serve some-j
what the same function as college,I
which keeps youth from the labor
market for the period of time in
school, Prof. Carroll pointed out.
Cheap ProjectsI
"If quite a few people in the
area join it would have a local
effect and some things which are
needed might be done more cheap-
ly," he explained.
Eugene Feingold of the political
science department commented
that the chances were probably,
best for the passage of the Na-
tional Service Corps because of the
generally good reputation of the
overseas Peace Corps.
"At the same time, however,
there is the problem of money.
Congressmen are already talking
about domestic expenditures," he'
noted. The initial program would
probably be small if passed; much
like the first Peace Corps program.
Great Problems
"I think the corps is a good idea
because the problems at home are
very great, just as they are over-
seas," he said.
The proposals for the corps point
out two things. In the first place,
it gives American youth something
inspiring and worthwhile to co.
And second, it calls attention to
the various American problems
such as the education of migrant
workers, Feingold said.

It has been argued that there
are social workers and teachers
to do the jobs of the domestic
corps. But "these corpsmen might
have more enthusiasm for the job,"
Feingold noted and added that
. there are not enough teachers or
workers for all the work.
Voluntary
He predicted that in much the
same way that the Peace Corps
operates, the local area which
would want help from the corps
would request members from the
federal government. Therefore, the
government would not arbitrarily
send corpsmen to an area.
"There has in the past been in-
terest in youth corps of this kind.
Now that the administration seems
ready to push these proposals there
is more chance of passage," he
added.
The United States National Stu-
dent Association is sponsoring a
conference on the merits and feas-
ibility of the National Service
Corps on March 2 at the American
University inWashington. USNSA
has announced that Attorney
General Robert F. Kennedy will
address the conference.
Student Government Council
members Howard Abrams, '63, and
Gary Gilbar, '64A&D, and SGC
President Steven Stockmeyer, '63,
will attend the meeting as repre-
sentatives of the University.

SUBVERSION:.
. ,
U .. Probes
Latin States
WASHINGTON MP) - A House
subcommittee announced yester-
day it will begin an investigation
Monday into Communist subver-
sion in Latin America, a problem
which has become a major one for
the United States, .
'United States officials and the
secretary general of the Organiza-
tion of American States, Jose A.
Mora, endorsed President John F,
Kennedy's emphasis, at his news
conference Thursday, on Commu-
nist efforts to , overturn Latin
American governments.
The President said Communist
activity against Latin American
regimes "is a matter which the
United States government is. giv-
ing its greatest attention to this
winter."
Highly placed United States of-
ficials said the government of
Communist funds, and agents of
subversion, espionage and sabotage
throughout Latin 'America have
become one' of two major topics
under constant review by the Na-
tional Security Council. The other
is the matter of division among
the Western allies in Europe.
Rep. Armistead Selden (D-Ala),
chairman of the House Inter-
American Affairs Subcommittee,
said yesterday two key United
Mtates officials and a Cuban exile
leader would be the first witnesses
when his group opens its hearings.
Appeals Court
Hears Petition
on Admission
ATLANTA (J)-The Fifth Unit-
ed'States Circuit Court of Appeals
heard a petition yesterday seeking
the immediate enrollment of Dew-
ey Greene Jr., at the University of
Mississippi.
The court said it would consider
the petition and act as soon as
possible.
Greene would become the sec-
ond Negro enrolled at Mississippi.
The first was James H. Meredith,
whose enrollment last year was
accompanied by rioting resulting
in two deaths.
Yesterday's arguments followed
a decision of United States District
Judge Sidney Mize of Gulfport,
Miss., who said Feb. 4 that Greene
should appeal to the university's
Committee on Admissions.
Edwin M. Martin, assistant sec-
retary of state for Inter-American
Affairs, will be the first witness.
John A. McCone, director of the
Central Intelligence Agency, is to
testify in secret on Tuesday, and
Ir. Manuel A. Varona,' former
president of the Cuban senate, will
appear at an open session Wednes-
day.-

'World News Roundup ]

1~ .1

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy is considering a State
Department shift which would
;move Averell Harriman up to un-
dersecretary in charge of political
affairs. Harriman, now assistant
secretary for Far Eastern affairs,
would succeed Undersecretary
George C. McGhee, who has asked
Kennedy for a foreign assignment.
McGhee is expected to get an im-
portant ambassadorial post.
UNITED NATIONS-The Unit-
ed Nations Special Fund, criticized
in Washington for going ahead
with a project for Laid to Cuba,
was reported yesterday to be study-
ing a Cuban application for an-
other project. Diplomatic sources
said the application called for as-
sistance to the technological fac-
ulty of Havana University. Pre-
sumably this would take the form
of foreign'administrators or teach-
ers.
WASHINGTON-President John
F .. Kennedy approved yesterday
proposed rules for the sale of $3.3
billion of materials from emergen-
cy stockpiles. He cautioned against
risking "any serious disruption" of
private markets.
r * *
MOSCOW-Soviet Premier Niki-
ta S. Khrushchev linked Russia
and Communist China yesterday
as brothers who together will
throw the last spadeful of earth
on the grave of capitalism. Plaster-
ing over the persistent quarrel be-
tween the two Red giants, Khrush-
chev insisted that Moscow and Pe-
king now are tied together in

"peace, friendship and brother-
hood."
* * *
NEW YORK-Democratic May-
or Robert F. Wagner yesterday
sought a revival of peace talks
in New York's 10-week newspaper
blackout. At the same time, Re-
publican Gov. Nelson A. Rockefel-
ler received a secret report on it.
* * *f
MOSCOW -Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev told correspondents
last night he will meet again with
Soviet intellectuals in their con-
tinued wrangle over freedom for
writers, painters and sculptors. He
said the meeting would be "this
winter."
* * *
WASHINGTON - The United
States is still seeking a permanent
anchorage for the three-ship force
of Polaris missile submarines it
will station in the Mediterranean
six weeks from now. Until some

country agrees or some arrange-
ment is made to harbor them, it
will use the Holy Loch, Soctland,
base of the North Atlantic Polaris
Squadron as the overseas main-
tenance point for the Mediterran-
ean group.
NEW YORK-The New York
Stock Exchange closed slightly
higher yesterday in moderately ac-
tive trading. Dow Jones averages
showed industrials up 1.21, rail-
roads up 0.18, and utilities up 0.37.
TONIGHT'S FEATURE
5:00-7:00 p.m.

C'41 )m

ro

CHRCH

it

ON

'"tI

\ ArBrI

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mgsr. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE,

VEAL CUTLET
a la Holstein
CENTER ROOM
Michigan Union Cafeteria

The DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER presents
ONCE FESTIVAL 1963
PREMIERES OF NEW MUSIC

Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
.. Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in Philosophy Tuesday at 8:00.
Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith Tuesday
and Thursday at 10 a.m., 2, 3, 8 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity Tuesday and
Thursday at 1, 3, 7 p.m. Sacred Scripture
Monday at 7:00, Thursday o 8:CJ. Medi-
cal Ethics Thursday at 7:00. Nursing
Ethics Monday at 8:00. Newman Classes
Friday at 8:00. Open Forum Wednesday,
at 8 :00.

February 16 and 17, 8:30 P.M.

JOHN CAGE & DAVID TUDOR
Ann Arbor Community Center, 625 N. Main
Single admission $2.00, week-end set $3.50
Tickets at Bob Marshall's Bookshop, 211 S. State

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST'
John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood

SUNDAY

I

11

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary,
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion .
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Anna M. Lee, Associate
Sunday-9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a m. Worship
Services - Dr. Loren Halvorson, Guest
Preacher.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
7:30 p.m. Universal Day of Prayer Ser-
vice in the Chapel.
Wednesday-7:15-7:45 p.m. Vespers.
Thursday-7:15 p.m. Study Group led by Prof.
Paul Kauper.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Woshtenaw Ave.
11 :00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)-
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT. CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
Holy Communion, Sermon by the Pastor,
~When He Instituted HolybCommunion."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study,
"Theology of Lord's Prayer."

FIRST
and

METHODIST CHURCH
WESLEY FOUNDATION

S. G.C.* PETITIONING for
PUBLIC RELATIONS

I

10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
SStaff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickettj
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor

State and' Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8.6881
Dr.,Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M.Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Minister's
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.---Morning Worship.
The Parables of Jesus, "Seeds and Soil,"
sermon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOiA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM) 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
10:15 b.m,.-Seminar, "Christianity and Com-
munism." "Prophetic Justice and Christian
Communism in Church History." Pine
Room.
5:30 p.m.-Student Cabinet meeting, Pine
Roam.
7:30 p.m.-Student World Day of Prayer,
Lutheran Student Center, corner Forest and
MONDAY
8-J1 p.m.-Open House, Jean Robe's apart-
ment,
TUESDAY
STUDY GROUPS - TRAINING IN CHRIS-
TIANITY
7:00 p.m.-New Testament 'Survey.
8:40 p.m.-Accusations and Doubts of the
World about the Church.
WEDNESDAY
4:00 pam.-Coffee Hour, Wesley Lounge.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Grad Supper.
THURSDAY
7:30 p.m. Kappa Phi, Wesley Lounge.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Board of Directors and their wives
and husbands, dinner.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Discussion, "What the Christian
Hopes for in Society."
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
MONDAY
12:00 noon-Lunch and Discussion.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services-9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "The Sermon
on the Mount," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
BIBLE LECTURE: 10:20-10:40' o.m., Mrs.
Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL, crib-9th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
STUDENT GUILD: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-
rI A9'

BOARD

-provide speakers to housing
units and organizations

!1

-publish

SGC

Newsletter

9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

I

f

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan