100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1961 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
State Officials Estimate
'U' Relations Road Improvement Costs CAPs
____ _____ ____OPTICIANS
to head an cSome $88 million would be the . Most frames replaced
cost that Michigan State highway that Mackie referred to was pre- while you wait.
esources for Department oficials estimate will pared by the highway department, Broken lenses duplicated
be needed for state improvements in co-operation with the County
vention. to county and roads FAST service on all repairs.,
tefa thent gruitye n Wash-ye rasAssociation and the Michi-
conyention tenaw County in the next 20 years. gan Municipal League. 240 NICKELS ARCADE
e m Tawould be sed on county smi In t was based on information NO 2-9116 NO 8-6019
on prepared $19.4 million on streets in the from many sources throughout
%if and oth- City of Ann Arbor, $7.9 million in the state.
may be con- the City of Ypsilanti, and $4.1 in The report is based on three
other localities, assumptions: one, that the new I \A Er i r r* K A E

The Michigan Council of State
College Presidents hired and ex-
ecutive director to head a Lansing
office devoted to research into
ways of standardizing operations
reporting practices among the
schools and spreading information
to the public and interested legis-
lators.
'"The main function of my job
will be to do research for the uni-
versities and compile information.
There is a large reserve of good
will toward the colleges that can
be increased if we make the facts
known to the public," Prof. Mer-
ritt Chambers, visiting professor of
education, . said in accepting $20-
25,000 per year post.
University President Harlan'
Hatcher claimed that Chambers'
appointment does niot conflict with
the legislative proscription barring
the council from hiring a co-coor-
dinator of colleges. Some of the
legislators, led by Sen. Frank D."
Beadle (R-St. Clair) believe it
does. Beadle, GOP caucus chair-
man,, can direct n'o action on the,
appointment, however, until the
Legislature meets in January.,
Cost Study...
A Detroit efficiency firm will try
to determine the cost of learning
at three state-supported universi-
ties, a special legislative committee
decided on the first of August..
A joint Douse-Senate interim
committee on higher education
hired the A. C. Lamb Associates
to start immediately on the $22,-
400 project involving Wayne State,
Michigan State and Western Mich-
igan universities.
Committee Chairman' Beadle
made it clear that the study is not
for comparison, but to provide a
guide for planning the expense of
higher education in the state.
Beadle hopes to follow up this
initial study with an investigation
of all nine state-supported univer-
sities and colleges. The Lamb
group is to report its findings in
January when the Legislature re-
convenes.
Peace Corps ...
C , The Peace Corps asked the- Uni-
versity to undertake a training
program for Thailand.
Dean of State-Wide Education
Harold Dorr, co-ordinator of corps
activities here, went to Washing-
ton twice to negotiate with corps
officials.
The proposed four-month train-
ing program would involve 75 vol-
unteers and six corps leaders.
The general program on campus
would include basic training in the
Thai language and culture, Amer-
ican institutions and culture,
physical fitness, personal health
and hygiene, and a.series of lec-
tures on corps orientation.
Specialized training would also
be asked of the volunteers, most
of whom are already college grad-
,uates.
Con-Con ...
Prof. Charles W. Joiner of the

These estimates were a part ofl
the "urban penetration" plan sug-
gested by State Highway Commis-
sioner John Mackie in announcing'
the projected 1,102 miles of inter-
state highways set for Michigan.
Recommends Improvements
Recommendations for improve-
ments in Washtenaw County in-
clude additions I-94, US-112
(soon to be renamed US-12), and
the US-23 expressway system;
four or more lane business routes
for US-23 and M-14 through the
city area; upgrading M-14 east,
from US-23 to a divided, limitedl
acces route, and the same for US-
23 north and south of Ann Arbor
and US-112 southwest from I-94.
Mackie conceded that improve-
ments such as this all over the
state will lead to a call for ad-
ditional taxes, but he said he
didn't "want to talk about the
price tag now."
He pointed out that recommen-
dations to meet the additional $3
billion that wil be required will
come in November when fiscal
experts from Michigan State Uni-
versity, Wayne State University,'
and the University make theirl
report.
Joint Preparation
The bulk of the report on needs

roads will handle cars and trucks
in the same sizes as today. The 12-
foot lane will be retained, despite
the increasing presence of very
small cars.
Two: That electronic traffic
control for the individual vehicle
will not come during the 20-year
period.
Three: That road building costs
will remain the same.
Mackie refused to comment on
tax questions, but he suggested
that "other taxes" than the pres-
ent six cent state gas tax be
used.
In addition to the Washtenaw
County areas, new construction is
projected for Grand Rapids, Flint,
Bay City, Saginaw, Kalamazoo,
Lansing, Niles, St. Joseph-Benton
Harbor, Jackson, andx Muskegon.
PAPER-BOUNSD
Huge stock for all classes
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE
tA

Wayne State University-fresh
veteran of a nine month struggle
to defend its policy allowing Com-
munist speakers on campus -is
now embroiled. in a controversy
over racial discrimination.
WSU is awaiting a ruling from
State Attorney General Paul
Adams on whether it must take a
"racial census of its non-teach-
ing employees.
The Fair Employment Practices
Commission has demanded 'the
census in the wake of charges lev-
elled by a Negro' mimeograph
operator who was dismissed by
WSU last year. He claims he was
fired because of his race.
WSU Provost Arthur .Neef lab-
elled the census "both legally and
morally improper and it works to
the detriment of the basic philoso-
phy of the FEP act."
Exchange ...
The University passed up a
State Department offer to' join in
a university- to -university ex-
change with the Soviet Union.

As part of this latter arrange-
ment, Prof. Nicholas Kazarinoff of
the mathematics department re-
turned this summer from Russia as
the first American ever to teach
a regular course at Moscow Uni-
versity.
Dearborn Rides ..
Mixed groups of white and Ne-
gro persons were denied service
in only two establishments tested
in an early July "Freedom Ride"
to Dearborn.
Negroes were refused entrance
into a restaurant which was re-
ported closed for cleaning. A
similar group was denied the use
of a bowling alley's facilities on
the grounds that no alleys were
available.
White "control" groups were
served in both instances shortly
thereafter.
The 49 representatives of the
Detroit and Ann Arbor Congress
on Racial Equality and Michigan
Young Democrats found no dis-
crimination' in the other 21 res-
taurants and bowling alleys tested.
CORE co-ordinator Anna Holden
said that many of the restaurants
tested did not practice overt dis-
crimination, but did display "mi-
nor discrimination" by giving ther
Negroes inferior service.
Negroes were frequently given
poorer tables than the "control"
group and subjected to increased
prices.

i

Ml

;r

m

lve n Wood'
READING DYNAMICS
revolutionary new method of
reading vertically down the page
will conduct classes= at'the YM-YWCA,
350 South 5th, Ann Arbor, Mich.,
beginning September 28th.
Classes will be held once a week for a
period of twelve weeks on Monday,
Thursday, Friday and Saturday. For further
information or literature, call NO 8-6007.

L

S

al

PROF. MERRITT CHAMBERS
new co-ordinator

WELCOME
COEDS:

It's Fall hairstyles galore!
* No appts. needed
*0 hairstylists
* Air-conditioned
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near the Michigan Theatre

WON'T,
SHBK
EVEN IF
YOUD
Adler SC's are guar.
antead not to shrink
out of fit or your mon.
ey back. Lamb's wool,
in men's and women's
sizes, in white and 12
other colors. Just $1
at fine stores.
,ADLER

The University of Michigan Newman Club

~3LZ~

CATHOLIC
STUDENT
Organization
ORIENTATION WEEK
ACTIVITIES

i

SC's

Fiday, Sept. 15, 7:00 - LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
PARTY starting with an ice cream social followed
by an introduction to the Newman Club, dancing
and entertainment.
Sunday, Sept. 17 - After 9:30 Mass there will be a
COMMUNION BREAKFAST, with Prof. G. B. Harri-
son, our club advisor, giving his annual introductory
talk.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan