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January 19, 1962 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-01-19

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1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1962THE ICHGAN AIh

. Technicians Leave
ribbean Crisis Area

'LOW-MAN-OUT FORMULA':
Alabama Plan Survives
Supreme Court Ruling

1.

* BULLETIN
SANTO DOMINGO (M -
The voice of Dominica ra-
o station announced last
ght that strongman Gen.
dro Rodriguez Echavarria
is been taken prisoner and
.e ousted state council would
reinstated.
The announcement came 48
urs after the general dis-
lved the council and set up a
w civilian-military junta.

'GROUNDSWELL FOR DEMOCRACY':
Three-Way Power Struggle
Reported in Russian Politics
LONDON (P)-Senior Communist party officials from the i5 re-
publics of the Soviet Union were meeting in Moscow yesterday as dip-
lomatic reports reached London of a three-way political struggle for
power.
British and other Western authorities gave this picture of the
political line-up which they believe has developed inside the Soviet
Union:
1) Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev, with his officially accepted
program of peaceful coexistence, is preserving an uneasy middle posi-
tion between two extreme and ac-y

SANTO DOMINGO (V) - The
United States technical mission
left for home yesterday as Domini-
cans offered continued scattered
resistance to the military-domin-
ated junta which suddenly took
over their government.
The United States mission,
which had barely arrived in this
torn Caribbean nation, was sent
to help the now deposed Council
of State shape up plans for a fast
economic recovery.
A communique from the United
States embassy, published on the
front page of the newspaper El
Caribe, explained that the change
of government appeared to be in
violation of the constitution and
that the United States was re-
examining its policy toward the
Dominican Republic. The newspa-
per appeared with many blank
spots imposed by the censor.
An undetermined number of
persons have been killed and
wounded since Tuesday when a
clash between demonstrators and
air force tanks resulted in an an-
nouncement by Gen. Pedro Rodri-
guez Echavarria, the armed forces
chief, that President Joaquin Bal-
aguer and most of the Council of
State had resigned. In its stead
he announced that three military
men and four civilians had form-
ed a new ruling junta.

tive pressure groups.
2) On one side of him, the so-
called antiparty group stands in
favor of a return to some of the
stark and rigid teachings of Stal-
in. The group has been identified
with such old guard Bolsheviks as
former Foreign Minister V. M.
Molotov, ex-Premier Georgi Mal-
enkov and onetime Deputy Pre-
mier Lazar Kaganovich. Their op-
position to the coexistence line,
frequently and fiercely denounc-
ed by Khrushchev's followers, ap-
pears to have the broad support of
Red China and little Albania.
3) On the other side of Khrush-
chev is a broad, unidentifiable
movement of young Soviet citizens
groping toward some of the ideas
and principles of Western-type
liberal democracy. This ground-
swell movement seems to have no
detectable leadership. Western
diplomats consider that some of
its inspiration comes from writers,
artists, university graduates whose
strivings towards greater liberal-
ism has been spurred by Khrush-
chev's laying of the specter of
Stalinism.

U

1.

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
announces the second annual
ONCE
A FESTIVAL OF MUSICAL PREMIERES
bringing to Ann Arbor internationally acclaimed
composers and performers of contemporary music
'FEBRUARY
9 evening THE NEW YORK AVANT-GARDE
10 evening CHAMBER ENSEMBLE PREMIERES
1 afternoon'PAUL JACOBS, pianist
16 evening ORCHESTRA - WAYNE DUNLAP
17 evening DORIAN WOODWIND QUINTET
18 afternoon ELECTRONIC MUSIC*'
evenings at 8:30; Sundays* at 2:30
at the First Unitarian Church
TICKETS: six-concert series $7.50
evening series (4 concerts) $6.00
*afternoon series 2 concerts $3.00
single concerts $2.00
on sale at Bob Marshall's Book Shop
or write: D.A.C., Box 179, Ann Arbor, Mich.

Netherlands
Accept Offer
From Thant
By The Associated Press
THE HAGUE-The Netherlands
yesterday accepted acting United
Nations Secretary - General U
Thant's offer of good offices in
its dispute with Indonesia and
proposed that he send observers
to New Guinea, where opposing
naval forces already have fought
one night engagement.
With both sides talking of ne-
gotiation, but with neither side
actually getting talks under way,
Thant asked yesterday that Dutch
and Indonesian representatives sit
down with him and discuss "the
possibilities of a peaceful settle-
ment."
Premier Jan De Quay, in his
reply, said he had instructed Am-
bassador C. W. A. Schurmann, the
Dutch representative at the UN,
"to place himself at your disposal
in order to have further discus-
sions regarding the possibilities
for a peaceful settlement."
Meanwhile, Rear Adm. L. E. H.
Reeser said the commander of In-
donesian torpedo boats engaged
by the Dutch in battle Monday
night planned to establish a
beachhead near Kaimana on New
Guinea's south coast. There is an
army garrison and airstrip there.
The top commander of Dutch
forces in New Guinea, after get-
ting interrogation reports from
some of ther52 prisoners taken
after one of their three torpedo
boats was sunk; told newsmen:
"these were regular army soldiers."
Indonesian talk of the force be-
ingmade up of civilian volunteers,
he added, was nonsense. The pris-
oners informed him that high
ranking officers accompanied the
expedition.
Rdusk Analyzes
World Affairs
WASHINGTON (P) - Secretary
of State Dean Rusk said yester-
day the Russians have not budged
on their Berlin stand and the sit-
uation there remains dangerous.
At a 25-minute news conference,
his first this year, Rusk also said
United States diplomats in the
Dominican Republic are talking
with local leaders in an effort to
promote a new democratic govern-
ment in place of the military jun-
ta which took over Tuesday.
"It is of the utmost importance
that the moderate elements among
the leadership in the Dominican
Republic find a basis on which
they can work together," he said.
Asked whether the United States
Navy will steam toward the Carib-
be nisland, Rusk said if that hap-
pened, "it would be known publicly
immediately."I

MONTGOMERY ()-Alabama's
unique low-man-out formula for
eliminating one of its congress-
men survived a court test yester-
day just two days before the offi-
cial start of the political cam-
paign.
The state is losing one of its
nine House seats because of the
1960 census, and the legislature
was unable last summer to pass a
redistricting bill.
Instead, it agreed on a make-
shift plan to allow each of the
present nine districts to nominate
a candidate, with the winners
fighting it out in a statewide low-
man-loses runoff. It became con-
veniently known as the 9-8 plan.
Court Ruling
The Supreme Court ruling came
barely in'time to guide the state
Democratic executive committee
in writing the rules for the party
primaries in May. Barring a re-
versal of tradition, Democratic
nomination is equivalent to elec-
tion in Alabama.
Committee members will meet
Saturday to signal the formal
start of the election campaign. In.
the absence of a decision by the
high court-or if the lower court
ruling by Circuit Judge Joseph M.
Hocklander of Mobile had with-
stood the appeal-candidates for
Congress would have been com-
pelled to campaign statewide in;
the first Democratic primary May
1 as well as the May 20 runoff.
Rejects Findings
Justice John L. Goodwyn, writ-
ing the Supreme Court's opinion,
rejected Hocklander's findings that
the 9-8 act is "incomplete, vague
and unworkable" and that it can-
not be used because it conflicts
with other election laws, includ-
ing a constitutional provision gov-
erning the use of voting machines.
The 9-8 plan requires paper bal-
lots, even in voting machine coun-
ties, in the statewide congression-
al runoff despite the fact that
Democrats in the same election
can vote for other candidates by
machine.
Hocklander agreed with the con-
tention by Maurice A. Downing, a
Mobile lawyer who challenged the

law, that once machines are in-
stalled in a county, they must be
used in all elections.
But Justice Goodwyn pointed
out that the legislature already
had made some exceptions, in-
cluding the use of paper ballots in
any election in precincts with less
than 100 voters.
tIN Offers
Aid in Congo
By The Associated Press
LEOPOLDVILLE - The United
Nations has offered the Congolese
government every possible assist-
ance in finding the Congolese
troops who perpetrated the Kon-
golo massacre, UN headquarters
announced yesterday.
A UN spokesman said it will
help, too, in preventing further
incidents of brutality and indisci-
pline.
Aerial reconnaissance of the
Kongolo area showed no signifi-
cant concentrations or movements
of troops. Port facilities of the
Lualaba river town in North Ka-
tanga province were silent and
deserted, the spokesman said.
Meanwhile, Secretary of State
Dean Rusk stoutly maintained
that UN intervention blocked a
Soviet "takeover" scheme in the
Congo and averted a Russian-
United States clash in the heart
of Africa.
Testifying at the opening of a
congressional inquiry into United
States support of that interven-
tion, Rusk expressed cautious opti-
mism that the Congo's often-
bloody political crisis "may be
moving toward an end."
The alternative to UN inter-
vention, he said, would have been
"violence and chaos and a ready-
made opportunity for Soviet ex-
ploitation - which the United
States would have been compelled
to conquer."

U.S. To Try
Moon Flight
CAPE CANAVERAL VP) -- The
United States plans literally and
figuratively to "shoot for the
moon" next week.
Undergoing final checks on
launching pads here are a trio of
powerful rockets designed to boost
the first American into orbit about
the earth, to land a package of
instruments on the moon and to
hurl five satellites aloft simul-
taneously.

I

IN THE

"Consort with the followers of olt religions
in the spirit of friendliness and fellowship."
-Abdu'l Boha
Lecture: BUDDHISM-the
Religion of the Middle Path

UNION

BALLROOM

MICHIGAN BAHA'I WORLD FAITH CLUB

Speaker: JOHN LIVENGOOD

I

AT 7:30

FREE

11

EXAM

WEEK

MOVIES

I

I

JANUARY 22-23-

BAHA' TEMPLE
Wilmetti, l.

To be selected from:
IVANHOE
CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS
CAPT. HORATIO HORNBLOWER

FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1962, 8:00 P.M.
418 Lawrence Phone 663-2904

U

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The Inter-American Peace Committee accused
Fidel Castro's Cuban regime yesterday of an unceasing campaign
to defame other nations of the hemisphere and to incite "violent sub-

JANUARY 24-25
HIGH SOCIETY

r I

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version" against their governments.
* * *
GENEVA-The three feuding
princes of Laos again deadlocked
yesterday over efforts to form a
united government. New outbreaks
of fighting were reported from
Laos itself.
*v
WASHINGTON - The United
States fired yesterday the 10th
shot of its current series of nu-
clear tests. The Atomic Energy
Commission announced the blast
at its Nevada test site was under-
ground as have been the others.
ALGIERS - French t r o o p s
stormed and captured a terrorist
hideout in Oran's Moslem, section
yesterday while strikes protesting
mounting insecurity crippled Al-
geria's two major cities.

i

Co )ME

-o

CrJ iI UCH!

:1

ON

'THE

SAB BATH

11

STEREO and HI-Fl
DEALER'S
COST
WEDNESDAY-January 17
THRU
SATURDAY - January 20
PRE-INVENTORY SALE
on
Every Label in Our Stock*

Al,

IL

$3.98 list
2.47
ABC
ANGEL
ARCHIVE
ARGO
ARTIA
ATLANTIC
AUDIO FIDELITY
BACH-GUILD
BETHLEHEM
BLUE NOTE
BLUESVILLE
BOSTON
CADENCE
CAEDMON
CAPITOL
CHANCELLOR
CHECKER
COLPIX

$4.98 Iist
3.09

5.98 list
3.71

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)1
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer. Rev. Franklin
Bennett.
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAY-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by,
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Mokin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11 :00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe..
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:06 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sot-
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511"Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday Services at 9:45 and 11:15. Worship
Services with the Pastor preaching on "Di-
vine Providence and Human Responsibility."
(Holy Communion at both services)
Wednesday 10:00 P.M.; Devotion, with Holy
Communion.
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow
Sunday:
9:00 and 10:30 Services-Rev. Jack Barck-
ordt..

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister'
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, intern Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class: Romans
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship. Discussion of hymns, post and present,
led by Dr. Rosello Duerksen, director of the
Ann Arbor Contato Singers.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert,. Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
JANUARY 21, 1962
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
Series on 1 Corinthians 13: "The Way of
Unselfishness." Sermon by Dr. Rupert. The
Service is broadcast at 11:15 A.M. on
station W.O.I.A.

1t,

Tf ,

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11

COLUMBIA LIBERTY
COMMAND LONDON
CONTEMPORARY MERCURY
CRI MGM
DECCA MONITOR
DOT NEW JAZZ
DYER BENNET OFFBEAT
ELEKTRA PACIFIC JAZZ
EPIC PRESTIGE
FANTASY RCA
FIESTA REPRISE
FOLKWAYS RIVERSIDE
GOOD TIME JAZZ SPOKEN ARTS
GRAND AWARD TICO
HI FI UNITED ARTISTS
IMPULSE VANGUARD
JUBILEE VERVE
KAPP WESTMINSTER

WEDNESDAYS
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion,
breakfost in the Pine Room.

followed by

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services at 9:30 and 11 a.m. "WHAT THE
CHURCH OFFERS YOU."
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40, Mr. Curtis E. Bot-
tum, Jr.
Church School, Crib-12th grade, 9:30 and
11 :00 a.m.
STUDENT GUILD: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-
5189.

THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Postor
Telephone N~rmandy 3-406 1

CAMPUS CENTER
-: SUNDAY
11 :30 Coffee Hour at the Campus Center

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
2250, Fuller Rood (Otivosite V.A.'Hospital)

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