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September 12, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:
Honors Programs Limited to Few

By MICHAEL OLINICK
In recognition of a "special re-
sponsibility" to students of su-
perior ability, the literary college
invites about 10 per cent of its
entering freshmen to participate
in the Honors program.
These students are selected after
appraisal of their various test
scores and high school records and
a personal interview with the pro-
gram's director, Prof. Otto Graf
of the German department.
The four-year program is de-
signed to give "opportunities for
greater depth in study through
the undergraduate years," accord-
ing to Prof. Graf. It features hon-
ors courses and honors sections in"
regular courses, special counseling,
opportunities to participate in re-
search projects of faculty mem-
bers, faculty student discussion
groups and directed summer read-
ing.
Every Department
Honors classes are offered by
almost every department in the
literary college and are intended
to give breadth and depth to
learning. Acceleration is intended
to be an accompanying factor,
only.
The honors classes take the form
of separately created courses. or
special recitation sections in com-
mon with a regular course's lec-
tures.
In addition to these basic aca-
demic units, the program offers
special interdisciplinary courses
open only to honors students.
These courses aim at surveying
areas that would be covered only
by many separate parts of other
courses, but which are inter-re-
lated.
Living Ideas
These include "Living Ideas in
the Social Sciences" taught by
Prof. James H. Meisel of the poli-
tical science department. Intended
primarily for sophomores, the,
course introduces them to the
ideas which have been and are
being used in the analysis of prob-
lems of the social sciences.
Another is "Revolutionary Ideas
on Science" open to all honors
students with ,noprerequisites
needed. This course treats evolu-
tion from the viewpoints of phys-
ics, astronomy, geology and zool-
ogy and is jointly taught by four
professors.
Other Courses
Other College Honors courses
deal with the concepts and meth-
ods of physics, romanticism in the
American arts, psychology and lit-
erature, the Renaissance, and gen-
eral systems.
Students are invited into the
rHonors Program whenever they
appear qualified for it, Prof. Graf
said. There is a periodic reclassi-
fication based on academic per-
formance.
Freshmen and sophomore hon-
ors students are expected to main-
tain a 3.0 average..Students with

a 3.5 average not in the program
are interviewed for possible ad-
mission.
Discussion groups led by faculty
members on topics of the students'
choosing and seminars led by dis-
tinguished visitors to the campus
have been regular offerings of the
program since its inception in
1957.
Honors Council
Members of the- Honors Council
-the faculty group that oversees
the program-volunteers to serve
as counselors for the honors stu-
dents.
In the junior and senior years
most of the honors work -is done
under the. supervision of the stu-
dent's department of concentra-
tion. Admission as a candidate for
an honors degree in a major re-
quires a 3.25 average in courses
already taken in the department
and an over-all 3.0 average.
All the departments in the liter-
ary college give honors degrees.

Many offer seminars or allow hon-
ors students to be excused from
one or more courses to pursue in-
dependent work under a faculty
tutor.
Steering Committee
'A student steering committee,
elected by the honors students
each spring, helps guide the pro-
gram by planning social events
and seminars, communicating
complaints to the council, and
helping advise on new programs
for superior students.
Closely allied with the Honors
program are the Unified Science
offerings. This program aims to
develop the scientific talents of
honors students who have had a
strong background in high school
mathematics and science.
The Uninect Science sequence
includes a series of integrated
physics and chemistry courses
which build upon one another and
which have been designed to make
use of mathematical skill as soon

as they are developed in the
parallel math courses.
Science Concentration
These math and science courses
amount to about one-half the stu-
dent's program for his freshman
and sophomore years. During the
upperclass years, students com-
plete a program of concentration
in the field of their choice.
A novel feature of the Unified
Science is the research tutorial
courses numbered Unified Science
291 and 292. This sequence is open
to sophomores in the program and
each participating student serves
as a research assistant to a faculty
scientist. He receives individual
instruction in research methods,
is allowed to participate actively
in some phases of research work,
and receives academic credit for
the time spent.
The program is under supervi-
sion of the Unified Science com-
mittee. The chairman is Prof.
Robert W. Parry, of the chemistry
department.

THOMPSON'S RESTAURAN
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
jpI ZZAj
will be served daily from
12 Noon to 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.
FREE DELIVERY
from 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE
OPEN 24 HOURS CLOSED TUESDAYS
221 N. Main St. - Opposite the Post Office
Phone NO 8-9550 or NO 3-3857

I;

The University of Michigan Newman Club

~ t

CATHOLIC
STU DENT
Organization
ORIENTATION WEEK
ACTIVITIES

OBI" IETS d'ART
....
n-Israel Crafts
-Carved African Paintings
-Carved Ebony Tiki Gods

Friday, Sept. 15, 7:00 - LET'S GET ACQUAINTED,
PARTY starting with an ice cream social followed
by an introduction to the Newman Club, dancing
and entertainment.
Sunday, Sept. 17 - After 9:30 Mass there will be a
COMMUNION BREAKFAST, with Prof. G. B. Harri-
son, our club advisor, giving his annual introductory
talk.
At 2:00 we will leave from the center for a picnic and
on afternoon of swimming, baseball, food, and fun.
.NEWMAN CLUB
332 Thompson (Next to St. Mary's Chapel)
OPEN ALL THE TIME

-Sake

Sets

-Wall Hangings
-Imported Crafts
-Contemporary Jewelry

LAKE'S ART, SHOP
Crafts for the college student and the collector

Basement across

from Lane Hall on State Street

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Read the Classi reds

UJeicome
to flichigan
...and Jacobson's
You'll find America's largest and most complete
campus fashion shop waiting for you at
Jacobson's, Michigan's leading fashion store
for almost one hundred years. You'll find
important names you know and trust as national

S ..'
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OF BACK TO SCHOOL NEEDS
Shop Early and Avoid the Big Rush. Take advantage of our
no charge for initials service and our convenient charge or
$1.00 weekly budget plan.

symbols of quality.

Come see us soon, your

away-from-home headquarters for everything
that signifies the fashion-perfection of the
U of M coed. Visit also our Home Decorative
Shop for your dorm essentials.

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