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January 09, 1962 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-01-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

hankers Not Out Yet' -Stager

NELSON CONSIDERED:
Witchita Signs Huerta
As New Head Coach

By DAVE GOOD
Michigan swimming Coach Gus
Stager isn't used to losing and
doesn't like it, but he isn't biting
his nails over his team's second'
straight third-place finish behind
Indiana and Michigan State in
Saturday's Big Ten Relays.
The Harrying Hoosiers shuf-
fled around various combinations
of their nine world-class or near-
ly world-class swimmers to com-
pile 103 points and win eight of
ten races. Michigan State got
everything it could out of its
sprinters to win the 400-and 200-
yd. freestyle events and beat out
Michigan for second place, 74-70.
"I was mad last year," explain-
ed Stager. "I'm not mad about
this, but I am disappointed. We
only lost by four points. It doesn't
hurt for MSU to beat us this
time. I just don't want them to
get in the habit of winning."
Wood Beats Somers
Michigan State won the 400
when anchorman Mike Wood

-Daily-James Keson
HOOSIERS AGAIN-Michigan coach Gus Stager is counting on
his distance freestylers this year, but here Claude Thompson
pulls for, home. in the 1600-yd. relay. Michigan captain Bill
Darnton couldn't overcome the lead Alan Somers, Pete Sintz
and Mike Troy gave Thompson.

CAGERS HIT 34 PER CENT:
Poor Shooting Shown Again

touched out Indiana's Alan Som-
ers with a spectacular 1:48.9. The
Spartans won the 200 by more
than two seconds over the Hoosier
sprinters. But the only other two
races in which Michigan State
could beat the Wolverines were the
500-yd. freestyle and 400-yd. med-
ley relays. In the medley, the last
race, Michigan State's anchor man
Bill Wood caught Warren Uhler
for second place behind Indiana.
"It wasn't Uhler's fault, though,"
put in Stager. "He swam a :51.9."
Wood swam the second-best 100
of the day, a :49.5.
"I don't think their sprinters
will help them that much in the
Big Ten Mleet," offered Stager.
"They're going to have trouble
with Indiana in the 400 relay.
No Sprinters
"I thought perhaps Indiana
would win all the relays but the
200-yd. sprint relay. They don't
have really good sprinters. In-
diana almost took that 400 free-
style, though. They lost it by one-
tenth of a second, and they were
slow on it. They should have won
it."
Stager also pointed out a slight
advantage Michigan could have
in trying to repeat last year's
second-place finish in the Big
Ten Meet. "I think your distance
men help you a little more in the
Big Ten Meet because there is
one more event-the 1500."
Stager explained that Michi-
gan State could have some good
distance men potentially, but Bill
Darnton, John Dumont, Win Pen-
dleton and Roy Burry beat the
Spartan 1600-yd. team by some 25
seconds. Stager also has Uhler,
Carlos Canepa and Tom\ Dudley
to choose from.
One Down
Right now, with Jim Kerr in-
eligible this semester, the two best
sprinters are Steve Thrasher and
Dennis Floden, but Stager was en-
couraged by Lauren Bowler's :52.8
for the 100 on a "B" relay.
The Hoosiers proved they can't
be touched in the specialty strokes,
with Ted Stickles and Tom Stock
in the backstroke; Mike Troy and
Lary Schulhof in the butterfly;
Chet Jastremski, Ken Nakasone
and Cary Tremewan in the breast-
stroke; and Stickles, Jastremski
and Tremewan in the individual
medley.
In addition they have Somers
and Pete Sintz in the freestyles.

WICHITA (M)-Marcelino Huer-
ta, Jr., 37, for 10 years athletic
director and head football coach
at Tampa, was signed yesterday as
Wichita's new head football coach.
Michigan end coach Jocko Nel-
son was being considered, but was
unavailable for comment.
The selection by a screening,
committee was approved by Wich-
ita Regents at its meeting lasta
night.
Highly Recommended"
Bob Donaldson, screening com-
mittee spokesman, said Huerta
was among prospects recommend-
ed highly by Hank Foldberg, head
grid coach who left Wichita to
become athletic director and coach
at Texas A. & M., Jan. 1.
Donaldson said the committee
vote was unanimous. He said
Huerta accepted a three-year con-
tract offer by Wichita President
Harry F. Corbin, "at a figure com-
parable to that paid Foldberg."
Foldberg received $12,000 a year
in 1961, his first at Wichita: was

boosted to $13,000 a year last Feb-
ruary.
Good Record
Huerta's teams at Tampa, an
independent of 1,400 enrollment,
have a 10-year record of 67 victor-
ies, 31 losses and two ties, They
have gone up against other inde-
pendents mainly, but with oppon-
ents including Alabama, Tennes-
see, VMI, Mississippi Southern and
Chattanooga.

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By JERRY KALISH
Michigan's fourth' consecutive
sub-40 per cent shooting perform-
ance coupled with eight defensive
lapses in the first ten minutes of
the second half told the story, in
the 91-71 loss to Illinois in the
Big Ten opener.
The Wolverine front line out-
shot 'the Illini bigmen, but the
guards made the difference. Illi-
nois guards Bill Small and Jerry.
Colangelo comzbined for 43 points,
connecting on 22 of 35 shots. In
comparison, Bob Cantrell and Jon
Hall were only responsible for 17
points, hitting on 6 out of 26
shots taken from the floor.

In commenting on his team's
poor shooting, Coach Dave Strack
said, "We missed a lot of easy
shots that we normally make. We
would get ahead of the defensive
man, but just couldn't put the
ball in 'the basket."
Hard Practice
Consequently, the Wolverines
spent Monday afternoon in a fast
moving session of practicing the
fast break and driving hard to-
wards the basket.
Strack's biggest concern right
now is the extent of leading scorer
John Oosterbaan's injured ankle.
Oosterbaan twisted his ankle in
the first half of the Illinois game.

Matmen Profit by Errors
In Stalemate with Panthers

Sporting a noticable limp, he did
not participate in yesterday's
scrimmage, but Strack is optimis-
tic that Oosterbaan and sopho-
more guard Hiram Jackson will be
ready for Ohio State. Jackson re-
turned to practice after recently
having a cast removed from his
leg. He did not make the trip to
Illinois.
Bright Spots
But there were bright spots in
Michigan's gray basketball picture
-the performances of Tom Cole
and John Harris. Assistant Coach
Jim Skala praised Cole for his
fine defensive job of holding high
scoring Dave Downey to 12 points.
Skala also pointed out that Harris
outrebounded and outfought his
taller opponent, 6-8 Bill Burwell.
(Harris; is only 6-5.)
Strack is fully aware that his
team will have to improve upon
its recent shooting slump in order
to make a respectable showing in
the Big , Ten Conference season.
Strack emphasized further, "We
have to shoot at least 40 per cent
to do any good."
Right Guess?
He indicated an apparent cause
for, the 33.8 per cent shooting
performance inrlastnSaturday's
game. He said, "Right in the early
part of the second half we found
ourselves 15 points down. We
missed a few easy 10- or 15-foot
shots and then began pressing.
Meanwhile Small and Colangelo
got hot and started hitting 25-
footers."
Expressing an opinion on Michi-
gan's upcoming conference tilts,
Strack was optimistic. He remark-
ed, "We are a young and relatively
inexperienced team, but we are
still capable of doing damage in
the Big Ten. We're liable to cause
a few surprises yet this season."

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By TOM ROWLAND
"We 'were up against a ;tough
Pitt team, and although we made
some mistakes, I think that you'll
find we're going to benefit from
them.",
Michigan wrestling mentor Cliff
Keen was pleased with his grap-
plers' 13-13 performance Satur-
day against Pittsburgh. Jack Bar-
den's draw in the heavyweight
clash left the contest deadlocked
in the first meet this winter be-
fore the home fans.
"It would be hard to single out
any outstanding performances,"
Keen said. "I think everyone on
the team wrestled well. They had
good poise, and if they keep up
the fortitude that they displayed
Saturday, we're bound to im-
prove."
Armelagos Good
Nick Armelagos dropped from
130 lbs. to wrestle for the first
time this winter in the 123-weight
bracket. The Wolverine light-
weight lost on riding time, 3-2, but
Keen is quick to comment that
"he was up against an Eastern
Intercollegiate Wrestling Associa-
tion champion, and I think that
Nick wrestled a good match."
"He can now wrestle at either
123 or 130," Keen said. "We have
three others giving Armelagos
competition at the lower weights
-Carl Rhodes, Mike Palmisano
and Ralph Bahna, and Gary Wil-
cox will still be at 130."
Pittsburgh coach Rex Perry
made a point of mentioning Wil-
cox after the meet Saturday. "Wil-,
cox looked very strong in his
match," Perry said. "I saw him
at the Wilkes Tournament, and
even though somebody beat him.
he came back very strong in the
consolations."
More Points
Wilcox picked up a 7-2 win
aaginst the Panthers. Michigan
also took points on victories by
Fritz Kellerman at 137 lbs. (7-2)
and Captain Don Corriere in the
167-lb. class (12-4).
Wayne Miller, Michigan's 157-
pounder, came from behind a 4-1

deficiet going into the third period
tof his. match to salvage a 5-5
draw. "We had counted on a vic-
tory at 157," said Pitt coach Perry,
"and the draw threw a cog into
our plans."
Undefeated in four contests this
winter, the Wolverine matmen will
be after their second Big Ten
victory this Saturday against Pur-
due at Yost Fieldhouse.
Jamaica Gets
Swi*m Coach
Miss Merrideth Forrest, a senior
in women's physical education, has
been appointed National Swim-
ming Coach for the island of
Jamaica.
This is the first time that a
woman has ever been 'named
coach of a combined men's and
women's swimming team for an
international games.

STORE7WI DE
Everything must go
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spring merchandise.
No exceptions.
Large stocks to choose
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making it easy selection.

ALL SALES
FINAL

I-M SCORES

RESIDENCE HALLS 'A'
Taylor 68, Allen-Rumsey 35
Winchell 52, Hinsdale 31
Reeves 77, Cooley 18
Wenley 38, Lloyd 31
Huber 37, Kelsey 34
Strauss 52, Green 42
Gomberg 46, Anderson 19
Hayden over Chicago (forfeit)
Van Tyne 43, Adams 40
RESIDENCE HALLS 'B'
Adams 34, Rumsey 14
Huber 38, Scott 27
Cooley over Green (forfeit)
Wenley 31, Van Tyne 13
Kelsey 42, Anderson 15
Reeves 43, Hinsdale 8
Taylor 31, Michigan 30

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