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January 09, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-01-09

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1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

4

South Vietnamese Aide
Discloses Offer by U.S.
To Send Combat Army

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Conservatism:
Difficult To, Gauge
By JACK BELL
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON-The evidence remains conflicting today on how
much power conservatives wil be able to muster in President John F.
Kennedy's second-year Congress convening tomorrow.
Many Republicans-including the party's top leaders in the House
and Senate-contend that a wave of conservatism is sweeping the
country and will make itself felt in congressional rejection of many
Kennedy proposals.
Administration Democrats dispute this. They say there is a strong
demand among the voters, for example, for enactment of the pro-
gram for medical care of the elderly, financed through social security.
'Conservatives denounce such a
program as unneeded and as "so-
oO Sets cialized medicine."
Probably the answer lies some-
S, where between these conflicting
A ccusations claims. Certainly there are no
clearcut signs that, as far as leg-
islation is concerned, the country
By The Associated Press. has moved sharply away from the
LEOPOLDVILLE - The Congo middle-road course that produced
Parliament yesterday adopted a the nearly dead-heat presidential
resolution asking Antoine Gizen- election of 1960.
ga, the deputy prime minister, to Democrats Claim-
return here immediately and face Democrats claim, and Republi-
accusations levelled against him. cans generally concede, that Ken-
It said that in view of the grav- nedy is enjoying a high degree of
ity of the accusations he must re- popularity. But Kennedy would be
turn here within 48 hours after among the first to agree that the
notification by the government to personal popularity of a President
defend himself in parliament. isn't always reflected in support
In Elisabethville the Katanga of his program in Congress.
government asked the United Na- In Congress itself, conservatives
tions yesterday to appoint quickly have made gains in' some areas
an international lawyer to advise and liberals in others.
Katanga in fields where the gov- Rep. John McCormack (R-
ernment and the National Assem- Mass), scheduled to become Speak-
bly have to take important deci- er of the House, is without ques-
sions concerning the future. tion more liberal in his legisla-
Announcing this, the president tive views than the late speaker
of the Assembly, Charles Mutaka, Sam Rayburn mD-kles
But McCorakmack lacks the
said the Assembly hopes the UN knack, acquired by Rayburn over
understands the Katanga govern-
ment's desire for assistance on many years, of coaxing southern
technical points of international Democratic conservatives to vote
law and would help Katanga in its on occasion for White House pro-
desire to act under international grams their political instincts tell
law. them to oppose.
Meanwhile, the United Nations Rules Committee
charged yesterday that 35 French- However, the House Rules Com-
speaking mercenaries arrived in mittee, a graveyard for several
Brazzaville yesterday and imme- key Kennedy proposals in 1961,
diately left by chartered plane for may prove more amenable to some
Ndola, Northern Rhodesia. presidential suggestions this year
A UN spokesman said the 35 despite the fact that it still is
acknowledged they were paid to presided over by staunch conserv-
fight for Moise Tshombe's Katan- ative Rep. Howard Smith (D-Va).
ga. The Republican leadership,
which can be effective only when
it can entice sufficient southern
M olotov B ack Democratic support, obviously will
continue to give its party policy a
A t 1} Atom Post nservative coloration.
/ hl this may not be to the
liking of the GOP liberals, house
MOSCOW (A)-V. M. Molotov is minority leader Charles A. Halleck
returning to his post in Vienna of Indiana will continue to make
despite violent condemnation -by what party policy there is..
the Communist Party Congress in Conservatives in the Senate lost
October that seemed to mark him a powerful ally in the death of
for oblivion. Sen. Styles Bridges (R-NH).
The Foreign Office announced Bridges could talk political tur-
yesterday the old Bolshevik left key with the conservative Demo-
by train during the weekend to crats.
resume his job as permanent So- Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz),
viet representative with the In- as chai'man of the Republican
ternational Atomic Energy Agen- senatorial campaign committee,
cy-The Atoms-for-Peace Orga- will continue to preach the con-
nization. servative gospel.

Americans
Deny Report
From Bishop
Diem Said Reluctant
To Accept Proposal
WASHINGTON (P-The brother
of the South Viet Nam President
said yesterday the United States
offered two months ago to send
combat troops to his country.
The report was quickly denied
by the State Department.
Archbishop Ngo Dinh Thuc, here
on a private mission en route to
Rome, told a news conference that
President Ngo Dinh Diem was re-
luctant to accept the offer. He
said Diem's view is to "defend
the nation with our own blood."
Last Moment
"We do need soldiers desperately
but will accept them only at the
last moment," Thuc added.
The Archbishop's statement was
in sharp contradiction to a state-
ment made by W. Averell Harri-
man, Assistant Secretary of State
for Far Eastern Affairs in a week-
end TV-radio interview.
Harriman said that nearly 200,-
000 South Vietnamese troops have
been trained with American as-
sistance.
No Discussion
"We have a very competent
group of Americans who are train-
ing the South Vietnamese and
there has been no discussion of
any outside troops."
Backing up Harriman, State De-
partment press officer Lincoln
White told a news conference "the
United States is not sending com-
bat troops to South Viet Nam ex-
cept for training purposes-if you
want to regard them as combat
troops in that light."
The United States* training mis-
sion in Viet Nam has been given
orders to shoot only if fired upon.
They are accompanying Vietnam-
ese forces into combat areas as
part of their training program.-
Citizens Hear
Herter, Others
PARIS (MP)-American and Eu-
ropean agreed yesterday that old-
fashioned political thinking should
be cast aside in favor of tighter
trans-Atlantic political ties.
The speakers, including former
Secretary of State Christian A.
Herter-addressing the opening
session of the First Atlantic Con-
vention of NATO Nations, a group
of prominent citizens-painted a
composite picture of an Atlantic
Alliance dragging its feet while
the Soviet Union is hurrying to-
ward its goal of world domination..

OAS Stages
New Strike
In Al1geria
ALGIERS (P)-The right-wing
Secret Army Organization again
demonstrated its influence yester-
day by staging a two-hour general
strike in Algiers and Oran.
Businesses closed their doors
throughout much of Algiers and
Oran and thousands of .Europeans
thronged into the streets--past
heavy security forces-shouting
antigovernment slogans.
No serious violence was reported,
and police also noted a sharp cut-
back of gunning and grenade
throwing which felled victims last
week.
The secret army, opposed to Al-
gerian independence, issued its
strike call to. support a protest by
hospital personnel who say they
are being too closely watched by
police.
French officials have accused
some hospital personnel of com-
plicity in escapes of arrested ac-
tivists brought in for treatment.
In Oran, Moslem garbage haul-
ers joined the strike leaving the
city's refuse piled on curbings.
Dispatches from Casablanca re-
port the Algerian rebels seriously
concerned about last week's step-
ped-up terrorist activitiy in France
and Algeria.

WASHINGTON 01)-Ten Free World countries are to build a
$6-billion currency pool which Secretary of the Treasury Douglas
Dillon said yesterday may well forestall a future rush on American
gold.
The funds will be available in an emergency to buttress the
stability of the dollar of any other major Western currency.
The ten-power agreement was announced by the International
Monetary Fund yesterday in climav to a year of negotiations. The

MONEY POOL:
Western Countries
Plan Stability Fund

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United States was

the prime

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mover in promoting the plan.
"We have achieved what we set
out to do," Dillon told a news
conference.
The pool, to be established after
ratification by Congress and oth-
er parliaments, will give the IMF
a big reserve which any of the
ten countries could tap to meet
temporary and unusual drains on
their gold and foreign exchange
reserves.
The United States Treasury ad-
vocated the plan' simply because
the IMF presently could make
available to the United States only
$2.8 billion of gold and hard cur-
rencies. This might be too little in.
a major monetary crisis.
The ten participating countries
would pledge to contribute fixed
amounts of their own currencies
in an emergency, but would not
put up cash unless funds were
needed.

World News Roundup

UNIVERSITY of LONDON
EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIP
Applications for the Student Leadershiip Exchange Fellowship at
The University of London are now available at the Scholarship Office,
2011 Student Activities Building, to graduating University seniors who
are interested in competing for this opportunity for study abroad. The
application form, which is brief, must be returned to the Scholarship
Office by 5:00 p.m. Friday, January 12.
This fellowship, which has been awarded since 1958, is a special
arrangement worked out between The University of London and The
University of Michigan for the exchange of an outstanding student from
each senior class. It includes all expenses except travel for a year's
study at the respective universities.
Both scholarship and leadership are considered in awarding this
fellowship. In scholarship, a student should have an outstanding aca-
demic record in the field he wishes to pursue at London. This is impor-
tant as the recipient must be qualified for admission to The University
of London. All previous holders of this award hove been Honor students
at this University.

13Betthe Views'
Arms Limit
Certain Soviet scientists have
shown interest in an alternate
plan of arms-inspection, Physics
Prof. Hans A. Bethe of Cornell
University announced.
In a speech at Cornell in Itha-
ca, N.Y., Prof. Bethe presented the
spot-checking solution originated
by Prof. Louis Bruno Sohn, Bemis
professor of International Law. It
.involves dividing both the United
States and Russia into a number
of sections.
Each country would report the
amount of missilesand armaments
that lies within each section --
without telling the specific loca-
tion of these arms within the sec-
tion. To assure that this would be
done honestly, the other country
could choose any one section and
examine it to verify that the re-
ported number was valid.
This plan, Prof. Bethe said,
would prevent the other country
from knowing the exact location
of the bases and yet would enable
it to be relatively assured of the
amount of the other's power.
Prof. Bethe said that the best
way of preventing nuclear war is
to create a stable situation in
which both sides have equal and
practically- invulnerable power.
The recent Russian tests, he laid,
have been an attempt to match
the'U.S.'s missile, Minuteman.
"This major part of their test
series therefore may well have re-
duced, rather than increased, the
danger of war,"
Now the situation is unstable, he
said, because both countries are
very vulnerable and therefore the
advantage lies with the one first
to attack. He predicted that both
sides would gain weapons of.im-
penetrable power which would lead
to the reduction of weapons.
Copyright, 1962, The New York Times

By The Associated Press
GUATEMALA-The presidential
press office said yesterday the
Guatemalan government has proof
that Cuba's Fidel Castro is pre-
paring an invasion of this Central
American nation.
* * *
ATHENS-The Greek govern-
ment has told Moscow that Greece
is following a purely defensive
policy and will never serve as a
springboard for attack against the
Soviet Union or any nation.
* * *
WASHINGTON-The Supreme
Court turned down two major ap-
peals yesterday involving the 1958
arrests of two Negro ministers in
Birmingham, Ala., who refused to
sit in the back of a bus as or-
dered \by the driver under a city
law.
WASHINGTON-Sen. George D.
Aiken (R-Vt) said yesterday ad-
ministration foreign trade and
United Nations financing propos-
als "are in for trouble" in Con-
gress this year.
* * *
ISTANBUL-A twin-jet Belgian
Sabena airliner radioed yesterday
that it was being pursued by Rus-'
sian MIG fighters, then veered
from its Tehran-Istanbul run to
land at the Soviet city of Yere-
van.
Sabena officials said it was
forced down.
UNITED NATIONS-Represen-
tatives of Britain, the United
States and the Soviet Union met
General Assembly President Mon-
gi Slim Fyesterday.
Informed sources said they d.s-
cussed the makeup of a 17-nation

committee that may take up the
Dutch-Indonesian dispute over
West New Guinea.
* * *
WOERDEN, Netherlands
Speeding through dense fog, a
crowded express plowed into the
side of a slow commuter train
with terrific force yesterday, kill-
ing 94 persons and injuring
scores.
* * *
WASHINGTON-The Civil Aer-
onautics Board moved yesterday
to let air lines take money from
"no show" passengers-but also to
let passengers collect cash penal-
ties when there are no seats to
go with their tickets.
* * -*
BONN-Britain's Prime Minis-
ter Harold Macmillan arrived last
night for a meeting with West
German Chancellor Konr'ad Ade-
nauer on Berlin.

I

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RING IN THE NEW
Are you-still writing "1961" on your papers and letters? I'll
bet you are,,you scamps!1 But I am not one to be harsh with
those who forget we are in a new year, for I myself have long
been guilty of the same lapse. In fact, in my senior year at
college, I wrote 1873 on my papers until nearly November of
1874! (It turned out, incidentally, not to be such a serious
error because, as we all know, 1874 was later repealed by
President Chester A. Arthur in a fit of pique over the Black
Tom Explosion. And, as, we all know, Mr. Arthur later came
to regret his hasty action. Who does not recall that famous
meeting between Mr. Arthur and Louis Napoleon when Mr.
Arthur said, "Lou, I wish I hadn't of repealed 1874." Where-
upon the French emperor made his immortal rejoinder, "Tipi
que noun et tyler tu." Well sir, they had 'many a good laugh
about that, as you can'imagine.) N
But I digress. How can we remember to write 1962 on our
papers and letters? Well sir, the best way is to find something
memorable about 1962, something unique to fix it firmly in
your mind. Happily, this is very simple because, as we all know,
1962 is the first year in history that is divisible by 2, by 4, and
by 7. Take a pencil and try it: 1962 divided by 2 is 981; 1962
divided by 4 is 490-1/2;1962 divided by 7 is 280-2/7.This mathe-
matical curiosity will not occur again until the year 2079, but
we will all be so busy then celebrating the Chester A. Arthur

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I

Liveliness and luxury at. a l~ow, lowprice!
A top-down picture in January?
;: . :Sure! We simply couldn't wait to
show you the easiest-to-own Chev.
rolet Convertible you ever flipped
a top. over! Get a load of that-
broad-loop carpeting, the elegant
instrument panel, and the leather.
like vinyl on those bucket seats
up front. We call it Fisher Body
finesse. What else will you find?
Plenty of zip, for one thing, from
a spunky 6. Plenty of room, too.
And the ride's firm, but ever so
gentle, thanks to new Mono-Plate
rear springs. Go see how inexpen.
sively your Chevrolet dealer can
put some June in your January
with Chevy I1!
Chevy II was put to the test
by the men who know cars best--
XIUTnP F TUP FA Q Tl A W ADfn

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k& ishI ri1 o71 ne d q y

bi-centenary that we will scarcely have time to be writing
papers and letters and like that.
Another clever little trick to fix the year 1962 in your mind
is to remember that 1962 spelled backwards is 2691. "Year"
spelled backwards is "raey." "Marlboro" spelled backwards is
"oroblram." Marlboro smoked backwards is no fun at all.
Kindly do not light the filter. What you do is put the filter end
in your lips, then light the tobacco end, then draw, and then
find out what pleasure, what joy, what rapture serene it is to
smoke the filter cigarette with the unfiltered taste. In 1962, as
in once and future years, you'll get a lot to like in a Marlboro-
available in soft pack and flip-top box in all 50 states and
Duluth.
But I digress. We were speaking of the memorable aMpects
of 1962 and high among them, of course, is the fact that in
1962 the entire House of Representatives, stands for election.
There will, no doubt, be many lively and interesting contests,
but none, I'll wager, quite so lively and interesting as the one
in my own district where the leading candidate is none other
than Chester A. Arthur!
Mr. Arthur, incidentally, is not the first ex-president to come
out of retirement and run for the House of Representatives.
John Quincy Adams was the first. Mr. Adams also holds
another distinction: he was the first son of a president ever to
serve as president. It is true that Martin Van Buren's son,
AT '.- -- f . "fmnnarnr +m n-:

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