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December 09, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-12-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECE ER 9 ,1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9,

PEACHER TRAINING:
See Defects in Preparation

THREE-FOLD IMPLICATIONS:
Panel Focuses on 'Population Explosion'

By PATRICIA O'CONNOR
A rising need for teachers train-
ed to handle increasingly complex
knowledge and technology has
spurred interest in five year pro-
grams for teacher preparation.
Programs of varying types have
been adopted by universities
throughout the nation, Henry
Harap, a former college professor
and now a specialist in five year
teacher preparation programs,
said.
Dispute has arisen, Harap com-
mented, over the degree of inte-
gration of -studies throughout the
five years as well as over the
feeling that four years of study
followed by actual teaching ex-
perience would make further work
more profitable than five years of
study.
Increasing Need
An increasing need for well
trained teachers is recognized by
both Prof. Lowell W. Beach and
Prof. Thomas S. Parsons of the
school of education. The more
subject matter and general edu-
cation a teacher can get the better,
but both men also recognize the
importance of the relation of the
teacher to the class.
Teachers in training should re-
ceive much more practical ex-
perience than they do," said Prof.
Parsons.
Prof. Beach also agrees that
students realize the value of many
of their professional education
courses only after they have had
a chance to face a class and feel
the responsibility of communica-
tion to the students.
Apply Knowledge
Prof. Parsolns, in a personally
conducted experiment, found that
former members of a class in edu-
cation who were in a position
later to draw on the knowledge
gained in the class had continued
to achieve beyond the level reach-
ed in the actual class. This did
not apply to members of the class
who had not had to apply their
knowledge.
While all professional classes
lose ground through an artificial-
ity imminent in a classroom ap-
proach, the teaching profession
suffers particularly from this, said
Prof. Parsons. In any five year
program; increased practical ex-
perience would be paramount, he
added.
Among the basic plans ennumer-
Play To Continue
Through Monday4
The University Players' produc-
tion of Henry Iv, part I, continues
through Monday with perform-
ances at 8 p.m. tonight and Mon-
day and a matinee at 3 p.m. to-
morow.

ated by Harap, some offer more
integration of professional educa-
tion along with the subject mat-
ter specialization and general edu-
cation., Such a program is felt
by most educators to be much
more beneficial than merely tack-
ing a " fifth year onto a regular
four year liberal arts program.
A five year integrated program
leading to a masters degree under-
went experimentation at the Lni-
versity. Only three people applied
which seemed to indicate a lack
of enthusiasm for the plan, noted
Prof. Beach. The students, who
are now in their senior year, be-
gan the carefully scheduled pro-
gram at the beginning of their
junior year.
A trend toward more education
of teachers is definitely felt how-
ever. This usually takes the form
On, 'Thon
University talkathoners are
on their way to victory.
Michigan State University
students hung up their phones
last night after 168 hours. The
West Quadrangle-Mary Mark-
ley Hall group passed its 144th
hour at 12:25 p.m. yesterday
and they have vowed to hold to
their Dec. 16 goal.
By next Saturday the Unive:-
sity talkers will have talked
343.5 hours straight.

of completion of a fifth .ear with-
in five to ten years after teaching
has begun, Harap explained.
Certificate Requirements
This trend can be evidenced in
the proposals made by a commit-
tee seeking to revise the Michigan
Code of Certification. A proposal
to strengthen the requirement for
a continuing certificate, now
known as a permanent certificate,
has been drawn up.,
Three years of successful teach-
ing and the completion of at least
ten semester hours additional
credit now forms the prerequisite
for a permanent certificate. If
adopted. the new plan would re-
quire three years of successful
teaching coupled with an advance
of a masters degree or the com-
pletion of 20 hours of advanced
credit.
The provisional certificate, now
good for five years, would be ex-
tended to six years under the new
plan to give an additional year to
meet the credit requirements.
Continued Education
In the midst of the controversy
over four year preparation with
further education following teach-
ing experience and a straight five
year program, the important ele-
ment is the need for continued
education throughout the career,
says Prof. Beach.
"Even if a doctorate were re-
quired before a person began
teaching, the need for continuing
the education would not be suf-
ficed."

Seminar Emphasizes Need
For Industry Recruiters

PROF. KENNETH BOULDING
. . . the message
Views Role
By BARBARA PASH
The essence of scientific dis-
covery is to form an image, derive
certain expectations from it and
then compare the resulting mes-
sage with the expectations, Prof.
Kenneth Boulding, of the eco-
nomics department, said yester-
day.
Prof. Boulding, speaking at a
Communication Sciences collo-
quium on "The Role of Commu-
nication in Peace Research,"
stressed that disequilibrium is cre-
ated when the message is not in
harmony with the expectation.
"When this occurs, we have
three choices: we can deny the
message, reject the inference, or
change the image itself," he said.
Problem of Choice
This is known as the epistomo-
logical process. Difficulty arises
because under some circumstances
any one of the three choices may
be correct.
The significance of a communi-
cations system is the perception
which each party has of the oth-
er. "However, the sociological
problem here is the way in which
a structure of a society affects
its communication," he said.
"International systems relate
images which have been built up
through a history of communica-
tions," Prof. Boulding explained.
"The trouble is that everybody
perceives the world through his
own personal screen and child-
hood trauma."
Images Differ
Both decision-makers and the
people who put pressure ,on them
have an image of their nation's
history. The United Statesthas
expanded against weak enemies;
Russia has a history of successful
defense, Boulding commented.

By ARTHUR LEVY
The economic, political and so-
ciological implications of the
world's population explosion was
discussed Thursday at a seminar
sponsored by the International
Affairs Committee of the Michi-
gan Union.
Dr. Jose Correa, pathologist at
the University Hospital, evaluated
Thomas Malthus' essay on popula-
tion.
Where the essay has basically
proven accurate in characterizing
population growth, it is wrong in
its prediction that man can pro-
duce food at a given rate of in-
crease and no more, he said.
Man Capable
Correa said that in both devel-
oped and underdeveloped coun-
tries, man has the ingenuity to
meet population increase with an
increase in the food supply. The
problem instead is one of access
and distribution of food.
John D. Lees, of the political sci-
ence department, said the problem
is both an economic and a so-
ciological one.
Although there is plenty of liv-
ing space in the world, people are
poorly distributed and strong im-
migration restriction policies, such
as those of Canada and Australia,
only aggravate the situation.
Other Factors
He maintained that maldistri-
bution of capital and declining
death rates add considerably to
the population problem. Further-
more, as living standards increase,
families tend to decrease in size.

Thus areas of low economic lev-
el have the most acute population
difficulty.
He also said that different
countries have different problems
and each should be considered by
itself, not subject to generalized
solutions.
Development Possible
Lees noted that in South Amer-
ica there are some natural re-
sources and land ayailable for de-
velopment, and people need to be
encouraged to invest in it. Eco-
nomic growth can be aided by in-
dividual activity.
Narayanan Namboodiri, Grad,
took up the question of population
control. As a sociologist, he saw

one way of accomplishing this in
restricting the birth rate. Natural
methods of brth control include
social emphasis upon late mar-
Extend Period
For Petitions
The deadline for turning in peti-
tions for five one-year seats on
Joint Judiciary Council has been
extended until Dec. 14.j
Applicants must have at least
junior standing, 60 hours of cred-
it and a 2.0 average to qualify,
but no extensive knowledge of the
judiciary is expected.

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riage, abstinence and rhythm
methods of limiting birth rates.
Medically supervised .abortion
which is legal in Japan, steriliza-
tion and infantcide are other ways
of controlling population.
Knowledge Needed
He maintained, however, that
not enough is known today to say
which method will result in what
effect. He said that experiments
in birth control had failed in Puer-
to Rico and in India.
In India, the people refused to
accept the changes demanded of
them, and were categorically op-
posed to contraception, abortion,
or any other attempt to interfere
in their private lives.

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7 C

Oluai c iH

By HELENE SCHIFF
The changing work force in in,
dustry today has made it neces-
sary for companies to employ per-
sonnel through a professional col-
lege recruiter.
The effectiveness of this college
recruiting for industry was the
main topic discussed at a Bureau
of IndustrialRelations seminar in
personnel techniques Thursday
and yesterday.
As the areas for employment
of unskilled labor are decreasing,
the areas of management are in-
creasing, Albert W. Schrader, edi-
tor of the Bureau of Industrial
Relations, said.
Competitive Search
The biggest potential source for
future employes in this recruiting
field is in the universities, he add-
ed. The search for the "one mil-
lion dollar man" is becoming high-
ly competitive.

a II

LUCKY TICKET WINNERS
for "PINAFORE"

are

College recruiting for industry
is a big business. Large amounts
of money are spent on it and a
great deal of time and ingenuity
is being applied to the systematic
coverage of almost every college
in the country, Schrader noted.
The representatives from indus-
try at the seminar, who were from
17 states and Canada, discussed
the various steps to "get the best
man for the job."
Need Recruiterj
First a company should have a
professional recruiter on its staff
who can tell a prospective employe
exactly what his job will be in the
company and also who can answer
his questions.
A brochure in the placement of-
fices is another step. A successful
brochure should answer basic ex-
pectations and questions that the
student has regarding the recruit-
ing process.
A company visit is a final ef-
fective step in recruiting.
All of these steps have become
very specialized and profession-
alized, especially in the engineer-
ing and science fields, Schrader
said.
Guiding Report
The seminars were based on a
report of research published by
the Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions, entitled "Effective College
Recruiting." The discussions were
led by Arthur S. Hann, director
of placement in the business ad-
ministration school and Prof.
George S. Odiorne, director of the
Bureau of Industrial Relations.
Other guest speakers included
Eric W. Vetter and Dean F. Berry,
research associates of the bureau.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Graduate Outing Club, Hike. Dec.:10,
2 p.m., Rackham, Huron St. Entrance.
* s a
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Dec. 10,
4 p.m., 3003 SAB. Speaker: Dr. A.
French, "Faith Healing."
* * *
Political Issues Club, Movie: "Our Al-
geria," Dec. 9, 2:15 p.m., Union, Rm.
3KLMN. Speaker: Nordine Ait-Lacos-,
sine, "Algeria: Let There Be Peace."
* * *
Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Dec. 11,
3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.

Wednesday
M. F. Center J 1
N4
03
Balcony Center BlO1
Left Cl

Thursday
M. F. Center B4
09
S9
Balcony Center A 10
Left A 2

DIAL NO 8-6416
* Ends Tonight *
ALEC GUINNESS
in
"LAVENDER
HILL MOB"'
and also in
"THE PROMOTER"
Starting Sunday
Ingmar Bergman's
"THE DEVIL'S EYE"

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow
Sunday:
9:00 and 10:30, Dr. Elton Trueblood, Professor
of Philosophy, Earlham College, Richmond,
Indiana.
11:50, Mr. Jack Borckardt.
CAMPUS CENTER
Sunday:
9:30-10:20 a.m. Seminar at the Guild House,
802 Monroe, "Scrutinizing the Christian
Faith."
10:30-11:30 a.m. Bible Study, "The Book of
Acts," Presbyterian Campus Center.
10:30 a.m. Coffe Hour. Presbyterian Campus
Center.
6:30 p.m. Quest and Question. Presbyterian
Campus Center.
Tuesday:
12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. Luncheon at the Guild
House, "Topics of the Ultimate Concern."
9-11:00 p.m. "TEA and TEAology," 217 S.
Observatory.
Thursday:
12:10-12:40 p.m. Chapel Service, Douglas
Chapel, 608 E. William.
Friday:
12:00 noon-1:00 p.m. Luncheon at the Guild
House, "Topics of Immediate Concern."
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer. Rev. Franklin
Bennett.
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)

Tomorrow at 8, Hillel presents
as the concluding program of its
35th Anniversary Celebration
THE HILLEL PLAYERS
directed by JERRY SANDLER
in a Reader's Theatre Version
"Moses Mendelssohn"
by Morton Wishengrad
AND
RABBI MAURICE B. PEKARSKY
Director, B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
at the University of Chicago
in an address on
"HILLEL and 'THE JEWISH REVIVAL"'
Admission is free to all 1429 Hill St.
Zwerdling-Cohn Auditorium

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister,
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
DECEMBER 10, 1961
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship. Ad-
vent Series: "Pilgrimage." Sermon. by Dr.
Rupert. The Chancel Choir will sing the
cantata "Come Redeemer" by Bach. The
Service is broadcast at 11:15 am. on sta-
tion WOIA.
10:15 a.m. Seminar on World Understanding:
Philippines. Speaker, Miss Nelia Guanco.
5:30p.m. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 p.m. Worship and Program: "Prince of
Peace or War?" Discussion led by Gene
Ransom. After the program the group will
decorate the Christmas tree and go caroling.
Tuesday:
8:00 p.m. Study Group on Contemporary The-
ologians, Jean Robe's apartment.
9-.11:00 p.m. Open House in Jean Robe's
apartment. Located beside Pine Room.
Wednesday:
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by break-
fast in Pine Room. Out in time for 8 a.m.
classes.
4-5 p.m. Midweek refresher.
Friday:
5:30 p.m. Wesley Grads, supper in Pine Room.
Please call 8-6881 for reservations. This
will be followed by caroling.
5:45 p.m. Young Married's meet for supper in
Social Hall.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. "The Power of
You," Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Church School, ages crib-12th grade: 9:30 and
1 1:00 a.m.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
WEST SIDE METHODIST
900 S. Seventh St.
Since 1846
Worship Services and Church School at 9:00
and 11:00: "The Stage of Christmas" by
Dr. Whited.
Church School and Nursery Care. Large Parking
Area, Mothers' Rooms.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.

r E

J~AB3 BATH

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
with Holy Communion, Sermon by the Pas-
tor, "Making the Most of Christmas."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper.
Sunday at 7:00: Christmas Candlelight Song
Service, Chapel Choir, Soloists.
Wednesday at 7:30: Advent Vespers, sermon
by Vicar, "Lift Up Your Heads!"
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder,.Pastor
Miss Anna Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sunday:
9:00 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
7:00 p.m. Play: "The Sign of Jonah."
8:30 p.m. Communion.
Wednesday:
7:15-7:50 p.m. Advent Service.
8:00-11:00 p.m. Christmas Party.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron - NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY:
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class: I Corin-
thians 1-5.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship. "A Ceremony of
Carols," by Benjamin Britten.
6:30 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship visits the American Baptist student
group at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsi-
lanti.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room Is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
urdoy, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service

I

DIAL 5-6290
" ENDING MONDAY "
Paul Newman
JoanneWoodWa
Sidney IFbitier

. ..

A

S.G.C.
TONIGHT and SUNDAY at7 and 9
LUST FOR LIFE
with

DIAL 2-6264
M ENDS TODAY "
ONi t O DM#G NS
M tfOSBYIAY
CMh~Y*EtN .
A PAMR UNRE RLASE "ECNKICIO
Sunday * Monday * Tuesday
OF
PASION
/ SUMMER Of V"a
l 17th VOLL"I
..i--

FRIDAY-
12:10 p.m.1
lunch at
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m.

Holy Communion followed by
the Canterbury House.
Daily evening prayer.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 7:00, 9:00 a.m.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 p.m.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 a.m. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 p.m.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 p.m.
NEWMAN CLUB ACTIVITIES
Sunday, Dec. 10, "Catholic open house," 3-5
p.m. Panel of students explaining Catholic
belief and worship. Everyone welcome.
Wednesday, Dec. 13, 8 p.m. Carol singing at

THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G Swank. Postor

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YM-YWCA Building, 5th Ave.
and East Williams
10:30 Service: The topic will be "Hypocrisy,"
Rev. Calvin Malefyt speaking.
6:00 n m Christma< Carol Sind.

spctac-VtAhI4

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