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September 12, 1961 - Image 53

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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.......................

CHEUB REPORT DISCLOSURE:U' Choirs
Stimulates Quad Actions'Welcome

By DAVID MARCUS
Dissatisfaction'with the quad-
rangles became a major issue last
year with the release of the con-
troversial Scheub report.
The 181-page document com-
piled by former Strauss House
resident adviser Harold Scheub in-
cluded student criticisms of stu-
dent government, dress regula-
tions, food and many. other as-
pects of the men's residence halls.
Aside from.its initial emotional
impact; there were several events
probably speeded up by the re-
port :

1) The residence hall board of
governors decided to conduct a
survey to determine residents'
views on housing conditions.
2) Interquadrangle Council held
a conference on the quadrangles
in April in order to bring out
ideas and problems facing the
system.
3) The Michigan House Plan
(basic philosophy of the system)
is being rewritten.
4) There have been miscellan-
eous changes such as food surveys
and revisions of dress regulations.
IQC President Thomas Moch,

FINANCES SLIM: ..
MeKevitt Cites Needs
For New 'U' Buildings

By RALPH KAPLAN

,

"The combined factors of aging
buildings and technical obsoles-
cence cause the continuous need
for new buildings and remodeling,"
John E. McKevitt, assistant to the
vice-preseident for business and
finance, explained recently.
"Therefore the Legislature's
failure to provide funds for new
construction and remodeling re-
tards the University's ability to
meet these needs," he continued.
McKevitt cited the School of
Music Bldg. as an example of the
damage caused by insufficient
capital outlay budgets. "That
building has been woefully in-
adequate to meet the needs of the
schgoolfor several years," Although
the Legislature appropriated $180,-
000 in 1956 for planning a new,
building, the construction funds
have. never been appropriated.
NoAnnual Norm
The fact that there, is no an-
nual norm of new construction
for the University is an important
facet of planning and budgetary
requests, McKevitt noted, He ex-
plained that the Legislature had
appropriated $8.6 million for new
construction in 1956, but only $1
million last year. "The University
tries to relate its requests to the
money available in a given year."
Another problem of University
planning is the fact that build-
ings built for one purpose ulti-
mately become needed for another
purpose. The Natural Science
Bldg. is an example.
"This building was an archi-

tectural innovation when- itwas
built in. 1914," McKevitt com-
mented. Since then, however, the
biological sciences have become
more interested in experimental
biology and comparatively less in-
terested in classification, Mc-
Kevitt explained. As a result the
program changes require contin-
uous reinvestment in rebuilding
and remodeling.
Relief Seen
Some of the space problem in
the Natural Science Bldg. will be
relieved, however,when the School
of Natural Resources moves from
the Natural Science Bldg. into the
remodeled West Medical Bldg.
North Campus has become in-
creasingly"important in Univer-
sity planning, McKevitt noted.
"This area is the University's land
reserve which is designed to ac-
commodate those unpredictable
needs which develop in all univer-
sities."
However, that there is no in-
tention on the part of the Uni-
versity to use this area solely for
science and technology buildings.
He noted that when the School of
Music Bldg. is constructed, it will
be on North Campus.
Of the eight buildings given
top priority for capital outlay in
this year's Regental request, four
-the music building, fluids en-
gineering building, and new build-
ings for the education school and
the architecture college are plan-
ned for North Campus.

'62E, feels that the events would
have happened anyway.
"At most, the Scheub report
speeded things up a month or so.
It will have very little long range
effect," he said.
Revision Planned
He noted that the revision of
the house plan and the IQC con-
ference had been planned for some
time.
John Hale, assistant dean of
men for residence halls, has cri-
ticized the statistical methods
used in compiling the report.
But whatever the effect of the
report it has raised a great deal
of talk about the residence hall
system.
There have been several solu-
tions proposed that are now be-
ing considered.
The Board of Governors of the
Residence Halls will soon discuss
the question of co-educational
housing. Under this plan, men
and women would live in different
houses in the same dormitories.
IQC has recommended the plan
and one of its staunchest sup-
porters is Moch.
AssemblyIgnores
But Assembly Association, the
women's equivalent of IQC, has
not yet considered the plan.
Similar arrangements have
worked successfully at the Uni-
versity of Chicago and at UCLA.
At the University, until several
years ago, East Quad contained
both men and women. Those who
lived in East Quad at that time
have. since expressed regret that
it was not continued.
Another possible solution is re-1
moval of the requirement for
freshman to live in the dormi-
tories.
'Army Conditions'
"It's like being drafted," one
RA commented, "no matter how
good the conditions might be with-
in the army, people always resent
being compelled to be there."
Another idea, expressed by a
few but which has not gone be-
yond even the initial discussion
stage, is the construction of
smaller residence halls, each about
the size of a cooperative or a
fraternity house.
It is felt that such buildings
would lessen the tendency of stu-
dents to feel lost in a large place
and to make the residence halls
seem less like hotels.
But at least one University ad-
ministrator has commented un-
favorably on the high cost of
building and running such units.

Tryouts
By RISA AXELROD
The University choirs, under the
direction of Prof. Maynard Klein
of the music school, will hold a
"First Rehearsal" meeting for all
new and interested students at
3:00 p.m. Sept. 17 in Lane Hall
Aud.
,The choir, which is a non-credit
function of the music school, is
composed of many separate and
specialized choirs, with a com
bined total of over 300 selected
voices.
Although the University Choir
has been on campus for many
years, it was not until 1948 that
it began to expand under the
leadership of Prof. Klein who then
became official conductor of Uni-
versity choirs.
Noted Conductor
Prof. Klein, who is well-known
as a festival choir conductor, has
been director of choirs at the Na-
tional Music Camp since 1943. He
is director and founder of the
Rackham Symphony Choir of De-
troit, the official choir of the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra.
The separate choirs within the
University choir specialize in spe-
cific repertory and offer credit
to all students of sophomore
standing and above. However,
freshmen may also participate in
each of the groups.
The Michigan Singers, as an ex-
ample, is a mixed choral group of
80 voices which rehearses one
hour a day, five days a week and
which conducts an annual spring
concert tour. This group contains
the Tudor Singers, a group of 16
voices which annually performs
in the Collegium Musicum.
Arts Chorale
Another credit choir within the
University Choirs is the newly
formed Arts Chorale, formally
known as the Bach Choir. The
Chorale will be a mixed choir this
year and will be subdivided on
occasion into a Women's Choir
and Men's Choir. These groups
also rehearse one hour each school
day.
Students from all colleges on
campus are represented within the
choir structure.
The 1960-61 choir season in-
cuded concerts, concert tours, and
classical recordings on the Uni-
versity radio station WUOM.

at the Univewskty
Presented by
THE UNIVERSITYMUSICAL SOCIETY
1961-62
, CHORAL UNION SERIES

GEORGE LONDON, Bass

. . . . . . .

Wednesday, October 4
. Thursday, October 19

THE ROGER WAGNER CHORALE
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
HERBERT VON KARAJAN, Conductor
BAYANIHAN (Philippine Songs

2:30, Sunday, October
. . Friday, November

22
3

and Dances)

Monday, November

6

. 0 . . . . .. . . .0

YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist
GALINA VISH NEVSKAYA, Sopr

. . 2:30, Sunday, November 12
ano . . Tuesday, November 21
. . .. Tuesday, February 13

EMIL GILELS, Pianist

0 0 . . 0 .

MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2:30, Sunday, March 4
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE..

Saturday, March 24

. 0 . .

Season Tickets:
Single Tickets (on sale

$20.00-$17.00-$15.00-$12.00-$10.00
Sept. 25)-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00 -$2.25-$1.50

i
4.

Nx +
AN INVITATION
You are invited to tour the Student Publications Building, home of The Michigan Daily.
During Orientation Week, come to the second floor and ask for a senior editor. He will
show you the offices and printing plant of the organization which can make you a campus
leader. T he Michigan Daily also cordially invites you to becwne a member of the organi-
zation 'which is a leader in its - feld. Opportunities for you are available on the business,
editorial, photography and sports stafs. Watch for an announcement soon of how you can

EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

MAZOWSZE (Polish Songs and Dances)

. Tuesday, October 24
Thursday, November 16

THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor

. . . 0

RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist .
BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCHESTRA
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor
LEONTYNE PRICE, Soprano .

Monday, November

27

. 2:30, Sunday, February 18

Monday, March 12

. . 0 .

Season Tickets: $10.00-$8.50-$7.50-$6.00-$5.00
Single Tickets (on sale Sept. 25)-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.25-$1.50
SPECIAL CONCERTS
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor

(Homecoming) Saturday, October 21

MESSIAH (annual Christmas concerts),

30, Saturday, December

2
3

2:30, Sunday

December

ILONA KOMBRINK, Soprano
Lim CHOOKASIAN, contralto
RICHARD MILLER, tenor.

ARA BERBERIAN, bass
MARY MCCALL STUBBINS, organist
LESTER MCCOY, conductor

UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION AND ORCHESTRA

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

NEW YORK PRO MUSICA
RICHARD DYER-BENNET,

. 2:30, Sunday,

October

29

Classical Folk Singer . . . . . . . . Saturday, January 13

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL (3 concerts)

. .February

Juilliard Quartet; Eger Players; Beaux Arts Trio
ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL

23, 24, 25
3, 4, 5,6

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA . .

. . . . . May

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