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September 12, 1961 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TURSDAti S Pl

THEIHIA ALYTEDA: E

Campus Groups Aid
Political Party Work
By LRIAB WlEnW S I

OTHER GROUPS EXCEL, TOO:
Symphony Band Charms Soviets

I

Great Variety of
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Embroidery, Crochet Cotton
Also for fal everything
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Partisan activity,, depending up-
on political orientation can come
with the Young Democrats or the
Young Republicans.
The YR's and YD's, with neigh-
boring offices on the 'second floor
of the SAB, are active in state and
national organizations. The YD's
are affiliated with the state Young
Democrats, including both college
groups and district organizations.
Republican Federation
Young college Republicans have
their own Michigan federation and
meet yearly in convention to for-
mulate a platform and elect of-
ficers.
Active partisan efforts in co-
operation with state parties at
election time, occupy the YD's and
the YR's. Both groups played
important roles in the 1960 Presi-
dential campaign and the Michi-
gan gubernatorial and Congres-
sional campaigns.
This fall the college politicians
will be working to promote the
constitutional convention, meet-
ing in Lansing to revise Michi-
gan's 40 year old, much-amended
Constitution.
The Democratic Socialist Club
provides a meeting ground for all
forms of Socialist thought. Not
affiliated with any national party
but rather a local group, the
Democratic Socialists bring to the
campus men like Norman Thomas
and Martin Glaberman, who gave,

a series of four lectures on Marx-
ism.
Discussion Group
Although it is a discussion and
lecture group, some individual
members play an active role in
Socialist party politics on the na-
tional level. Several members work
with the Committee for Improved
Cuban-American Relations.
The bi-partisan Michigan Citi-
zenship Clearing House, in its first
year on the Michigan campus,
aims at interesting young colleg-
ians in politics.
It is affiliated with the 10-year
old national organization. Its di-
rector, Karl Lamb, an instructor
in the political science department,
says the the organization is for
partisans and also "for those who
have made no political committ-
ment."
Sponsor Conferences
Annual programs have included
a "Party Leader Day," with state
party leaders, George Van Peur-
sezx, Neil Staebler and Joe Collins
among them, gathering for
speeches, party caucuses and a
luncheon with students.
The Clearing House has a senior
Party Training Conference, a legis-
lative internship program in which
a student works for one intensive
week as staff aide for a member
of the Legislature.
The non-partisan Political Is-
sues Club hasa wide range of ac-
tivity. Dating'from 1954, it was
one of the first student organiza-
tions tot bring speakers to the
campus, and claims to be the
"father" of other liberal and po-
litically oriented groups like Chal-
lenge and Voice, both, born this
year.

By DAVID MARCUS
From Kiev to Kharkov to Cairo,
the University's Symphonic Band
this spring completed what the
State Department called one of
the best-received cultural ex-
changes the United- States has
ever sponsored.
The four-month tour, capped by
a June 2 concert in New York's
Carnegie Hall, was a series of
unbroken triumphs for the 94
members who elected to lose a
semester of school in return for
the tour of the Near East and
Iron Curtain countries.
The Symphonic Band is one of
the three University bands, along
with the Marching and Wolverine
groups, sponsored by the music
school.
The symphonic band, directed by
Prof. William D. Revelli, plays
concert programs consisting of
classical arrangements for band,
modern compositions especially
written for band, and some light
contemporary American music
from films and Broadway musi-
cals.
Marching Band
The Marching Band-nationally
famous for its precision forma-
tions and 220 step per minute
pace-is known primarily for its
exhibitions at fall football games.
Prof. Revelli also directs this
group.
The Wolverine Band, whose ac-
tivities center around extra-cur-
ricular events such as basketball
games .and Ann Arbor civic func-
tions, is designed primarily for
students who do not wish to de-
vote the time necessary for the
marching or symphonic band or
who lack the proficiency needed
for the other two groups.
The Wolverine Band is direct-
ed by Prof. George R. Cavender.
But it is the experiences of
symphonic band members that
have been the highlight. of this
last year for the University bands.
Congratulations
Congratulations have poured in
from private citizens, State De-
partment officials and music edu-
cators. The state Legislature pass-
ed a resolution praising the group
and the group received a highly

I

RHAPSODY IN BLUE--The Symphonic Band has won national renown for itself and the Univer-
sity for its excellent concerts throughout the nation. This spring the 94-member group won added
acclaim when it traveled to Russia and the Near East on a four-month tour under the auspices
of the State Department.

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SDS Affiliation
Affiliated with the, national Stu-
dents for Democratic Society, PIC
serves an educational function, as
it sponsors both campus wide pro-
grams and small seminars for its
own membership.
Direct action projects in the
field of civil rights have been in-
cluded in PIC's program. In 1960-
61, the group sponsored showings
of "Operation 'Abolition" and
brought to the campus Herbert
Mills, picket leader for the Cali-
fornia anti-HUAC demonstration.
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laudatory review from the New
York Times.
Prof. Revelli recounts the sue-
cess of the trip in ternis of the
many exchange recitals held with
Russian music schools to the Ooint
'where many may be considering
initiating bands themselves after
hearing the University group, and1
the extensive contact between thej
band members and Russian stu-'
dents and citizens.
Students-despite the bedbugs
and dysentery-recall a warm re-
ception with a public anxious for.
information and news, of the
United States. J
Soviet Impression
The Russians were also trying to
make a good impression on the
visiting group.
One girl recalled that when she
took a picture of a rather un-
sanitary market in a Russian
town she was "arrested," her film
was confiscated, and she received
a lecture on "why are you trying
to bring back the bad things
about Russia."
Others recalled friendly meet-
ings with their Soviet contempor-
aries though people often were
hesitant because of objections by
some Iron Curtain governments
to its citizens being in contact
with foreigners.
But all felt that the concept of
music as a universal language had
prevailed throughout the trip and
had facilitated communication,
penetrating both linguistic, and
cultural barriers.
Exchange Recitals
Recalling the band's exchange
recitals, Prof. Revelli noted that
the quality of 'the Russian musi-
cians *as high. But so was the
quality of the University's musi-
cians judging by the translations
of the foreign reviews that he has.
One Warsaw paper said that it
was hard to believe that the Uni-
versity band did not consist of
professional musicians.
Revelli said that at one time
the band rose before an incredu-
lous audience and the question was
asked "Could people this young
be professionals?"
The band's tour program in-
cluded mostly serious music, with
a few light numbers interspersed.

A review noted the quality of the
band's transcriptions, but Prof.
Revelli said, "They didn't realize
that most of this music had been
especially written for band."
In other years, the band has con-
cluded its season with a short
spring tour.
Auditions for the symphonic
band, which practices daily
throughout the year, are held at
the beginning of the fall semes-
ter.
The Marching Band, with 170
members, practices for eight weeks
during the football season. Re-
portedly, the seven hours per week
drill through the two-month period
collectively lessens the weight of
the band by, about 800 pounds.
The Wolverine Band also takes
over the marching functions from

the Marching Band at the end of
the football season.
University bands date back to
1844 when-a nine-piece group as-
sisted at chapel services. In 1895,
the Regents' ordered the organiza-
tion of an official University band
which assisted at official func-
tions during commencement week
and played at athletic and social
events.
Three years later, the band was
furnished with uniforms. In 1914,
the first annual spring concert
was presented and the proceeds
used to purchase new uniforms. A
year later, the band got its first
permanant conductor.
The bands also have a library
staff, a, business manager and an
equipment manager to handle the
administrative side of the various
groups.

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MARK TIME-While the musicians in the Marching Band go
through their paces and formations, the flag bearers mark time
on/the sideline. The banners include the state and national
flags, as well as. those of every school in the conference.

and

EVERYO

NE IN
SHOPS

ANN

AT

0

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