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November 19, 1961 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-19

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PAGE TWO

TH - M . -C, -- piv.47v FI~ Ai n.j

_ "1L L' 111 VlYll¢HL LfY l1.y T. '

SUNDAY, NOVEMP

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Forums Serve Composers

By MARTHA MacNEAL y
"Even though the Composers'
Forums are quite- unusual and give
an exceptional chance for insight
into the trends of contemporary
music composition, very few stu-
dents and faculty members at-
tend them," Roger Reynolds, Grad,
said.
"This situation reflects the un-
willingness of society to know its
own art ,Rather, society seems to
reject it,", he continued.
The Composers' Forum, was or-
ganized by Prof. Ross Lee Finney
through the school of music in
1948. Presently under the direc-
'Voice' Guest
To Consider
tons to War
David McReynolds, executive
secretary of the War Resistors
League, will speak in Ann Arbor
Monday and Tuesday.
On tour fo rthe Student Peace
Union, McReynolds will speak for
Voice Political Party on "Non-
violent Alternatives to War" Mon-
day at 7:30 p.m. Rm. 3R-S of the
Union.
Tuesday noon, McReynolds will
speak on "The Immorality of Civil
Defense" at the Guild House. He
will speak on "Nonviolence in a
Violent World" at 8 p.m. in the
Wesley Lounge of the First Meth-
odist Church.
McReynolds is a conscious ob-
jector, and has contributed to
"Progressive" and "Liberation
Magazines."

tion of Prof. Leslie R. Basset, (on
leave); Prof. George B. Wilson;
and Prof. Finney.
Cites Opportunity
It offers the opportunity for
graduate and some undergraduate
students to hear their composi-
tions played and discussed by
other students and faculty mem-
bers.
Works are selected for per-
formance by professors on the
basis of merit from manuscripts
submitted by students.
Three forums are held each
year, and are recorded by WUOM.
"This is not done at most schools,"
Reynolds stressed. "Special co-
operation with teachers of applied
music makes it possible."
Discussion Period
After each forum, there is a
discussion period allowing the
composer to hear criticisms, and
suggestions about his work.
"The composer hopes to learn
from audience reaction-but there
is hardly any audience," Reynolds
said.
"Another problem is that it is
difficult to criticize a work after
having heard it only once." Re-
vision follows, usually in con-
sultation with faculty members
who consider the capacity for re-
vision, when necessary, extremely
important.
Bridge 'Gap'
"There is sometimes a wide gap
between what the composer thinks
he will hear and what he does
hear," Reynolds declared. "A
painter can look at his picture as
he creates it, but the composer
has to wait until his work is com-
plete before he can hear it as it
actually sounds.

Test playings before the forums
would be good, but are not always
possible. Often, the students and
faculty members are able to point
out instances when the musical
notation does not seem to fulfill!
the composer's intentions," he ex-
plained.
"The problem of transferring
the composer's idea of sound to
actual instrumental performance
is a difficult one.
Rehearsal's Role
"The composers oversee and
work with the performers during
rehearsal, to see what difficulties
arise and to learn the capabilities
of certain instruments as they
apply to their works," Reynolds
said.
"It is very difficult to get works
in alvanced idiom performed pro-
fessionally; students have fewer
prejudices about the kind of music
they will play, and often give ex-
cellent performances.
Lessons and seminars also give
performance opportunities to new
works. Rehearsals may begin sev-
eral months in advance of the
performance date, or only a few
weeks before, depending upon
when the compositions are finished
and how difficult they are," he ex-,
plained.
Direct Compositions
A composer often writes music
with a specific performer or group
of performers in mind,and asks
them specifically to play it.
"If there are many string per-
formers, and if they are go'd, a
great deal of string music will be
written because the composer
wants a sympathetic perform-
ance," Reynolds notel.
Mental and technical difficulty
of compositions often necessitate1
contact between the composer andI
performer. "The composer at-.
tempts to talk the performer into
believing in the musical validity1
of the piece.
This enlarges the performer's
scope of musical ideas, and helps
the composer to learn what is ac-
ceptable to a performer," Rey-1
nolds said.i

ITALY-Prof. George Kish of the geography department dis-
cusses ancient Rome and Italy with Prof. J. A. Hanson of the
classical studies department on a recent program in his series
"The Story of Italy."
PROGRAM NOTES:
Russian oprano
To Present Concert

Vacation
A victim of a fraternity prank
has proven that survival on 15
cents is possible in a trip to
New York.
Dan Denawetz, 20-year-old
Michigan State University sen-
ior, was sent on thestrip by his
fraternity, Phi Kappa Sigma.
He is expected to return today.
The adventure began Wed-
nesday when Denawetz was
having dinner with the frater-
nity. Told of a long distance
call, he went to the next room
to be seized by eight fraternity
pledges.
The pledges forced him into
a car and drove him to the
Willow Run airport. They gave
him a one-way ticket to New
York City and a United Air
Lines plan, making sure he had
no more funds than a dime for
a telephone call and a nickel
for a post card to the frater-
nity.
On board he met an alumnus
of the University, who lent him
$3.
Arriving in Newark he call-
ed the fraternity and his fath-
er, Joseph Denawetz of Detroit.
The fraternity said it' would
send him return fare, and his
father sent him $25.
"I'm not angry anymore,"
Dan commented after receiving
the additions to his original
spending resources.
"Educational Utopia
in Science circa 1984"
... a discussion based on John
Hersey's book, The Child Buy-
er, moderated by Dr. Claud
Eggertsen, professor of Educa-
tion.
MONDAY, Nov. 20
4:15 P.M.
Room 4009 U.H.S.
Shonsored by
Ed. School Student Council

many residents of benefiting from
the change.
Second is the lack of privacy
and the disturbance that might be
created from forcing the residents
to keep their doors open when
they have visitors.
Public Reaction
Public reaction to the change
has been largely against it.
Letters to the editor have usual-
ly charged that, if approved by the
Board of Governors, quad room
visiting privileges would lead to
moral deterioration of University
students.
Although Tirrell said there is
no organized alumni opposition
and says he has received only a
few letters, he added that sev-
eral groups have gone to see Uni-
versity administrators about the
matter.
Alumnae Opposition
One Detroit alumnae said that
both she and the local women's
group of the Alumni Association
were against any such visiting
privileges.

University President Harlan H.
Hatcher said at last Friday's Re-
gents' meeting that, "We ought to
be calm and judicial" about the
request.
He noted that the Regents could
overrule a Board of Governors de-
cision, since power is delegated to
the Board by the Regents but that
"anything said here would be
prejudicial to the orderly process."
IFC Proposal
A similar resolution has been
approved in principle by the In-
terfraternity Council Executive
Committee but the process for ap-
proval is different.
First, a resolution must be for-
mulated and submitted to the Fra-
ternity Presidents' Association.
Then it must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Discipline, the
Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs and the Dean of Men and
the Dean of Women.
Like the IQC resolution, IFC
wants to allow each fraternity to
decide within certain hours wheth-
er or not it wants women in the
house.

Board To Consider 'Ruling
Allowing Women in Quads
(Continued from Page 1)

l
v

Galina Vishnevskaya, a leading
soprano of the Bolshoi Opera,
Moscow, will present the seventh
concert in the Choral Union Se-
ries 8:30 p.m., Tuesday, in Hill
Aud.
She will sing "Cantata No. 21,"
'Suefzer, Tranen, Kummer, Not,'
and "Mein glaubiebes Herze" by
Bach; "Abscheulicher! Wo eilst
du him?" by Beethoven; and Four
Songs and Dance of Death, by
Moussorgsky.
Organ Conert.
Prof. Ray Ferguson, of the mu-
sic school, will give a public con-
cert at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Hill Aud.
Pieces by Bach, Langlais, Lizet,
Peeters, and Messlaen will be pre-
sented.
Renaissance Music * ..
The Collegium Musicum, a
University organization present-
ing old or little-known music of

the Renaissance era, will give a
concert at 8:30 p.m. today.
The concert will include music
by C. P. E. Bach, de Vitoria; Bux-
tehude, Garbiele, Carissimi, Vec-
chi, Schultz, Lassus, Hammer-
schmidt, and de-Mondonville.
Italian Culture...
The story of Italian culture as
reflected from its churches, tombs,
palaces, and art will be discussed
by Prof. George Kish, in his tele-
vision series, "The Story Italy,"
noon today on WWJ-TV.
Entitled "The Tale of Four Ci-
ties" the program will view the
culture of Ravenna, Palermo,
Venice, and Florence.
Class, Politics . .
Prof. Seymour Lipset of the Uni-
versity of California at Berkeley,
discusses the effect of American
class structure on its politics withj
Prof. Morris Janowitz, of the so-
ciology department, on "Accent,"
7:15 a.m. Saturday on WJBK-TV.

Continuous
Today
From 1 P.M.
-Guinness Festival * 2 Encore Hits!

DIAL
NO 8-6416

Musicians Testify on Plight
Of Performing Arts in U.S..

I

ALEC GUINNES BEST ACTORIOF THE YEAR SCORES A NEW TRIUMPH!"
ALEC -Cue Magazins
GUINNHESS KIDHAT
0ENNiS YRtERfE JOAN W N
,PIE-S OLERIE N0AI O CORONETS
AND
Solid satire...a choice piece of movie foolery"--Newsweek
as 1
.i T1410 MAN
} IN THEP
wso starring Joan Greenwood and Cecil arker
A J. Arthur Rank organitation Presentation

i

"The future of fine arts in the
United States is in grave danger,"
conductor Leopold Stokowski said.
Stokowski testified Wednesday
at a hearing at the United States
Court House before Representa-
tives -Frank Thompson Jr. and
Charles S. Joelson, both Demo-
crats from New Jersey; and Robert
S. Giamo (D-Conn).
Thompson is chairman of a
select committee of education of
the' House Education and Labor
Committee. The subcommittee is
ch1i gan State
Receives Gifts,
For Cyclotron
EAST LANSING - More than
$900,000 in gifts have been received
by the Michigan State University
Board of Trustees toward the con-
struction of a campus planetarium
and cyclotron.
A grant of $700,000 from the
National Science Foundation will
be used for the design and con-
struction of a new 50-MEV vari-
able-energy, multi-particle cyclo-
tron, which is expected to be the
nucleaus for a scientific research
area.

investigating the economic plight
of performing artists.
List Witnesses
Included among the witnesses
were George London, Metropoli-
tan Opera star; the managers of
the New York Philharmonic or-
chestras; and Herman Kenin,
presilent of the American Federa-
tion of. Musicians.
Almost all who testified urged
Federal, state and local subsidies
to save the arts, pointing out that
the performing arts which are
subsidized by - governments in
Europe and the Soviet Union enjoy
much more prestige.
Kenin cited the "indifference of
some 173 members of the House
of 'Representatives who voted
down, during the closing days of
the first session of the 87th Con-
gress. a very modest but mean-
ingful proposal to create a Fed-
eral Arts Council."
Sponsors Bill
The bill was sponsored by Rep.
Thompson.
The bill had "the nonpartisan
blessings of the two most recent
occupants of the White House,
as well as those of art patrons,"
he said.
"Serious music cannot survive
much ,longer in the United States
without assistance from the gov-
ernment," he stressed.

FOR SERVICE, RESEARCH:
Regents Grant Leaves of Absence,

-

-

r

SIC FLICS.

"IT IS A POWERFUL MOVIE"
-Richard Ostling, Michigan Daily
"Hard-Hitting! Realistic! Memorable!"
-A. T. Weiler, N.Y. Times
R KIRK
DOUGLAS
IN
TWN1
WITHOUT
- PITY
DIAL 5-6290
-
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
MY
UNIVERSITIES
The Gorky Trilogy, Part 3

The University Regents granted
16 leaves of absence for reasons
of military service, research, fed-
eral appointments, and miscel-
laneous requests.
One sabbatical leave was cancel-
led by request.
Sick leave was granted Prof.
William Haber of the economics
department from October 28 until
the end of this semester.
Gilbert B. Lee, reseaich as-
sociate in the opthalmology de-
partment; Prof. Wiliam C. Mc-
Crary, of the Spanish department;
and Juris Upatnieks, research as-
sistant in the Institute of Sciahce
and Technology all were granted
leaves for military service.
Permission for leaves to gov-
ernment appointees were granted
to Prof. John C. Kohl, of the
engineering department, who will
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Cercle Francais, Nov. 21, 8 p.m., mo-
vie, Brigitte Bardot, "En Effeuilant la
Margerite," Undergraduate Library,
Multipurpose Room.
Congregational Disc. E & R Student
Guild, Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m., "Peace Ac-
tion: The Ethics of Compromise," Grey
Austin,'Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Folk Dancers, Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m., In-
struction and dancing, Hil1el, 1429 Hill.
Gamma Delta Lutheran Student Club,
Nov. 19, 6 p.m. supper; Ensian picture,
6:45; business meeting, initiation, 1514
Washtenaw Ave.
Lutheran Student Association, Nov.
19, 7 p.m., Student Center, Hill and
Forest, "Federal Aid to Education,"
Paul Kauper.
Graduate Outing Club, Nov. 19, 2
p.m., hike. Meet at Huron Street en-
trance, Rackham.
Wesleyan Guild, Nov. 19, 7 p.m., Dr.
Hoover Rupert, "Why I am a Meth-
odist," Wesley Lounge, Methodist
Church.

become assistant administrator.
transportation of the Housingand
Home Finance Agency, and Prof.
Robert L. Knauss of the law school
to the Securities and Exchange
Commission.
Leave Granted
Prof. Warren L. Smith of the
economics department has beer
granted leave to. serve on the
Council of Economic Advisers to
the President of the United States
and to advise on fiscal policies.
Prof. Waldo E. Sweet of the
romance languages department
was granted two-thirds leave to
complete the production of auto-
mated Latin learning materials.
In other research requests, Prof
Albert H. Marchwarlt of the Eng-
lish department was granted leav
to visit Japan and Thailand to
study English language projects.
John F. Weir of the English Lan-
guage Departmentwas also grant.
ed leave to prepare himself for
his work.
Off-Campus Assignments
Off-campus assignments wer
granted to Irene Hess of the In-
stitute for Social Research to as-
sist the National Council of Ap-
plied Economic Research in New
Delhi, India. Prof. Geraldine
Scholl and Prof. Irving H. Ander.
son, both of the education school,
have been granted leave to do a
comparison of English, Scottish
and American children's achieve-
ments 'in reading, writing and
spelling.
Sabbatical leave was grantec
Prof. Carl H. Fischer who wil
conduct a survey of the social
Take a bus to the airport
this Thanksgiving!
WILLOPOLITAN
November 22, 1961
Tickets on sole at the Fishbowl.
Another service of
Alpha Phi Omega.

I1
e
e
)
e
0
s

security system of the Philippines.
The study will be a follow-up of
his original study made before
the system was put into operation.
Prof. Russell T. Woodburne,
chairman of the anatomy depart-
ment, has been granted leave to
serve as visiting professor of ana-
tomy at the University of Wash-
ington during the winter quarter.
In miscellaneous action, Jean
W. Butman of the Institute for
Social Research was granted one
month's maternity leave and Prof.
Edward E. Hucke of metallurgical
engineering was granted his re-
quest to cancel his second semes-
ter sabbatical leave.

En Effeulilant
la Margerite
BRIGITTE
BARDOT
Tuesday-8:00
Multi-purpose Room
UGLI
CERCLE FRANCAIS

u6iE , 5MvERS IOeiACC Co.

4

"Thanks, Mr.Frobish-but I still think
I'd rather have CHESTERFIELDS !"

21 GREAT TOBACCOS MAKE 20 WONDERFUL SMOKES!
AGED MILD, BLENDED MILD- NOT FILTERED MILD-THEY SATISFY

.--..om...

DIAL
2-6264

dNwI

SHOWS AT 1:00-
2:50-4:55-7:00
and x:10; Feature
starts 10 minutes
later

lI
LAND HO!
A NEW MUSIC AL COM EDY

OL

I

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