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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1961

1981 ~T MI C] f~

AN DnA TE

f

By JOHN McREYNOLDS

"We know how to improve air-
craft safety-we're finally making
improvements," Prof. Paul M.,
Fitts of the psychology department
said yesterday concerning Project
Beacon, the recently announced
air traffic control program.
The 14-point program, released
Sunday by President John F. Ken-
nedy, calls for the use of alti-
tude and identity reporting bea-
con transponders, extensive use
of military control systems, and'
Federal Aviation Administration'
control over planes flying above
24,000 feet in mountainous areas,
14,500 feet in the airlanes or 8,000
feet over congested areas.
Speed Routing
Other suggestions included se-
gregation by speed of airlanes and
terminal areas and a speed limit
of 230 miles an hour for plands
under the altitude of 8,000 feet.
"The beacon transponder, a de-
vice which receives a radar pulse
and automatically responds with
a signal indicating the plane's
identification and altitude would
be a great aid to increased safety,"
Fitts, a former researcher in the
human engineering aspects of air
traffic control systems, said.
Could Avert Collisions
"If the beacon system had been
in general use a year ago, the
air crash over New York City, last
December, probably would not
ACWR Asks,
P c
Peace Course
The Americans Committed to
World Responsibility will have a
petition in the fishbowl today and
tomorrow asking the University to
establish a credit course on the
problems of peace and 'war.
The petition is the one that 300
people signed at the Veteran's Day
Assembly Saturday.P

By FREDERICK ULEMAN
"There is really no such thing
as defense in the nuclear age,"
Donald Keys, program director
for SANE Nuclear Policy Inc., said
yesterday.
Keys, in a lecture on "Mankind
In Suicide," explained the holo-
cast of a nuclear war and then
noted that "we must make sure
that the deterrent doesn't become
the detergent."
Membership in the nuclear club
is "getting out of hand," he noted.
Any reactor which is used for
peaceful purposes will build up
by-products which can be used in
the production of atomic weapons,
Keys explained.
Both Sides Stand Firm
Both sides are standing firm,
but neither believes the other's
willingness "to commit national
suicide." Thus the governments
take extra risks to convince the
world of their firmness, and it
amounts to a "Russian roulette
with nuclear bombs," he said.
One of the biggest breakthroughs

in this "vicious circle of increas-
ing insecurity" is the agreement
on general principles for disarm-
ament negotiations between the
United States and the Soviet Un-

T

ion.
Under this agreement, all na-
tions would have virtually total
disarmament, retaining only small
arms to maintain order within
the country, with the United Na-
tions settling international dis-
putes, he explained.
'Reciprocal Paranoia'
The major problem between the
East and West on disarmament
is the "reciprocal paranoia." The
Russians are worried that inspec-
tion will be used to supplement
United States intelligence efforts
and the United States believes
that without inspection there is
no assurance of disarmament.
Comparing the United States
and Russia to "the mongoose and
the cobra," Keys said that inter-
national politics should be more
.than a reaction to Soviet maneu-

RITZ BEAUTY SALON

DONALD KEYS
. .. discusses deterrents

COMPLETE LINE OF BEAUTY WORK.
605 E. WILLIAM
PHONE NI 8-7066
J6
ONE EXPERIENCED salesman and
handyman wants a part time job.
Afternoons and/or evenings. Call
Bruce. NO 2-5571. J8
MAGAZINES-for special student and
Christmas rates. Call NO 2-3061, Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, Box 1161 AA.
J5
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity, NO 8-8887. J31
GENIUS with shears. Don Orenso, beau-
tician and barber. 320 S. Main. J9
COME IN AND BROWSE AT THE

2
3
4

ONE-DAY
0
.85

Figure 5 average words to line
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
.58
.70
.83

PROF. PAUL M. FITTS
... air safety
have happened, because the plane
controller at La Guardia airport
could have warned the jet not
under his control of the danger,
knowing that the planes were at
the same altitude.
Beacons Inexpensive
The beacons will cost a maxi-
mum of $500 apiece, according to
the Project Beacon committee.
"We can no longer depend on
pilots to avert midair collisions
with their small 'cone' of vision
from the cockpit of the plane."
Fitts concluded. "I would definitely
recommend the FAA sponsor long
range research, projects, especially
investigating the possibilities of
computers, in addition to their
present short range plans."
Hatcher To Hold
open Io use, teva

vers. We should regain the "moral
initiative," he said.
Other questions should not
be subject to involvement in the
arms race. If they are, the ex-
ploration of outer space could
change from man's greatest ad-
venture to his "prelude to an obit-
uary," Keys noted.

yi
I
1
i
1
r
F

529 Detroit St.

NO 2-1363

The communication sciencesj
program anticipates approximately
70 graduate students for the aca-
demic year 1962-63.
This will be an increase , of 25
students over the present enroll-
ment of 45 and, represents ap-
preciable growth over the three
graduate students enrolled in the.
program at its inception in 1957-
58.
Since 1957, one doctorate and
ten masters degrees have been
awarded.. Prof. John Holland re-
ceived the first doctorate in 1959
and is now the first-professor of
communication sciences.
Concerned with, Theory
A unique doctorate program, the
laboratory and cognated curricu-
lum is concerned with understand-
ing on a theoretical basis the com-
munication and processing of in-
formation by both natural and
artificial systems. Natural sys-
tems include the biological facili-
ties for speech and artificial sys-
tems encompass computer and
symbolic communication.

The basis for

the communica-I

tion sciences is interdisciplinary
in nature with foundations pri-
marily in five bordering disci-
plines: mathematics; electrical
engineering; physiology; psychol-
ogy; and linguistics.
The eight major areas of study
currently emphasized in the pro-
gram are computers, adaptive sys-
tems, automata, system simula-
tion, speech communications,
mathematical linguistics, psycho-
linguistics and semantics.
Offers Special Courses
Offering 20 special courses and
intergrating many of the math,
electrical engineering, philosophy,
psychology, and linguistics courses
already offered, the program pre-

pares graduate students for any
phase of the communication
sciences.
Student work is supplemented
by a research laboratory, which is
technically independent of the
program and employs a separate
full time research team.
Research is structured to polish
and fill in the "rough diamond"
of communication relationships
(see diagram).
The four points of the diamond
are formal systems (computer and
symbolical) formal language, na-
tural (biological and verbal) sys-
tems and natural language. The
striations of the diamond are
between the kiown areas.
betveen the know areas.

Featuring student furnishings of all
kinds, appliances, typewriters, tele-
visions, bicycles, etc. Open Monday

and Friday Evenings 'til 9.

J4

President and Mrs. Harlan
Hatcher will hold an open house
and tea from 4 to 6 p.m. today
for all students.
This event is sponsored by the
Michigan Union.

NEED SOMETHING? We have it!
Food, kitchen utensils friendliness.
All this and much more at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
J3
NEW HI-FI battery operated transis-
tor portable tape recorders. 25% dis-
count. Call NO 5-4574 after 6. B37
FOR SALE: Double bed $45; English
Bike, $23. Call NO 2-4042. B36
FOR SALE-8 mm. Keystone Movie
Camera, ProJector, light bar, screen,
and accessories. Going as outfit for
$110. Must sell 50% of original cost.
413 Lloyd. NO 2-4401, B38
LAMBRETTA 1958, lots of extras. Best
offer. Call NO 5-0199. B39
1961 TELEFUNKEN console AM-FM-
Shortwave stereo auxiliary speaker-
$125. Call 665-0847. B401

... ..x.. .......,. .....;:..? : v t"i}r; ':.4
~~
.~3 - ~j
I / _
,;i :j & i
represent formal systems, formal .:::vlanguage, naurl ystmsan
:
'xc" 5.::.t
x
"ROUGH DIAMOND-This diagram shows how r'esearch is
structured in commtunication relationships. The four points
represent formal systems, formal language, natural systems and

WE ARE OVERSTOCKED IN GIRLSI I
Boys come in and meet all the avail-
able girls at the Daily. Try your
hand at working here tool Fun, Fun,
Fun. F22
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, enjoy the hang-
over. Maybe even try the very special
mixture. Love. A jug of wine, a loaf
of bread, and me. Really leaves a
dangerous hangover doesn't it. F23
EXPOSED l l What was once rumor is
nowfact. There are animals at 548 8.
State. J.C. P27
'SO YOU WANT TO TRAVEL ABROAD?'
If that is what you want, plan to
come to the panel discussion at the
League Wed. at 7:30 and get tle
facts (and a free poster or brochure,.
F28
WHAT? YOU WANT TO TRAVEL
ABROAD? But you don't know how
to get out of Ann Arbor. Come to
the Student Panel Discussion (get
free brochures) 7:30 p.m. TONIGHT
at the League. F29
BIG CLUB-Sat., Nov. 18, 9:30-12:30
(Late Per). Featuring The Arbors.
Music by Johnny Bell's Band. P30
JEANIE, don't you think its kinda
risky for Bill to try to make two
lovers arfriend? Happy Birthday, Me
and Me too. P31
CECILIA: Another weekend like the
last one will kill me but we've all
got to go sometime. Frenchy. P32
THE MICHIGANENSIAN has openings
for e:xperienced photographers. See
Tim at the Ensian office, 420 May-
nard. Tues., Wed., or Fri. aft. F33
DEAR DOLL, What's the matter, do
you have another date? I want to go
to Soph Show Saturday. Love. Guy.
P34
DEAR JOE, Come on over to our pan-,
cake supper Sat. 5-7 p.m. All the
pancakes and sausages you can eat
for $1.00. So bring all your friends. See
you then. Trudy. P35
GREAT BACCUS has spoken,
Hops are in bloom (Wed., Nov. 15)
T.C.A. we harken
Golden fluid to consume. F6
AL YOUNG-coming Dec. 7 at Ann Ar-
bor Armory. Phone 1Marclntosh, 5-5568
or 3-7204. P60
THE KINGSTON TRIO will be appear-
ing at the Lansing Civic Center, Lan-
si g on Wed., Nov. 8. Tickets now on
sale at the Bud-Mor Agency, 1103 S.
University. NO 2-6362. F34
PHOTOS by Bud-Mor, fast, dependable
service, reserve your photographer
now for Father's week-ends, pledge
formals, and Christmas dances. Phone
Bud-Mor Agency, NO 2-6362. F50
ARE YOU collecting Marlboro, Philip
Morris, Alpine, and Parliament boxes?
Remember there is a package saving
contest going on. F3
DIAMONDS WHOLESALE. From our
mines to you, Robert Haack, Diamond
Importers, 201 S. MainSt., NO 3-0653.
P30
GENIUS with shears. Don Orenso, beau-
tician and barber. 320 S. Main. J9
WANTED: Songwriter or Lyricist. Pop-
Rock, 50/50 Collaboration. Sal Lig-
gleri, 910 South 5th, Ann Arbor. H4
BOL WEEVILS, Ann Arbor. Fabulous
Dixie-land band, now accepting book-
ings for late fall and early winter.
Bud-Mor Agency, 1103 S.U. NO 2-6362.
F53

ir

LOCAL CHURCH seeking pt. time pal
ish visitor, good wages. Send qual
fications to Box 23 of the Daily. H
ATTENTION ROTC
OFFICERS' SHOES.
Army-Navy Oxfords - $7.95
Socks 390 Shorts 690
Military Supplies
SAM'S STORE
122 E. WASHINGTON W

V

Why buy from out of
town - see this

STUDENTS: Beautiful, 1 bedroom, ful-
ly furnished cottage, along Huron
River in Dexter. To be' rented just
during week. Can be seen any week-
end. 3672 Central Street. C18
1 GIRL WANTED to share 3 bedroom
house in Livonia. For info, call NO
8-7284. C16
SENIOR desires large room near Archi-
tecture Building. Call Paul at NO 2-1
5571. C17
TWO ROOM SUITE-For men, close to
campus, no cooking. Call NO 2-8796.
C1

Shure M7D Cartridge

not io3.-4

YOU Save 22%
at

Challenge, Discussion on Moral &
Ethical Views of Nuclear War Prepara-
tions-Prof. A. Kaufman, Nov. 16, 7:30
p.m., Undergrad Lib., Honors Lounge.
*
Chess Club, Meeting, Nov. 15, 7:30
p.m., Union, Rm. 3B. Everyone welcome.
* * *
German Club, Coffee Hour, German
Conversation & Music, Nov. 15, 2-4 p.m.,
4072 FB.
* * *
Michifish, Tryouts, Nov. 15 at 6:45
& 8 p.m., Women's Pool. Sign up with
the Pool matron for time.
* * *
Newman Club, "Hillbilly Howl" Square
Dance, Nov. 17, 8:30-11:30 p.m., New-
man Ctr.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica, "Subida al
cielo" (Mexican Busride)-celebrated
Mexican comedy with Spanish dialogue
& English subtitles, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.,
Angell Hall, Aud. B. Members free.
Everyone welcome.

A distinguished address with
every modern apartment conven-
ience provided: our own bus
service, large private balconies
for outdoor living, the sophisti-
cation of a swimming pool and
sundecks, complete building
maintenance service, trustworthy
domestics and underground park-
ing at your option, individual
room heat and air conditioning
controls, color-coordinated kitch-
ens, continental bathrooms. Stu-
dios with dressing room, one, two
and three bedroom apartments
available on most floors with
heat, water, range and refrigera-
tor included in rental. We invite
your inspection of our model
apartments on the premises.
SPECIAL 2-BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
FOR FOUR STUDENTS
NINE- OR TWELVE-MONTH
LEASES WITH PERMISSION
TO SUBLET

304 S. THAYER

ACROSS FROM HILL AUDITOR
Service and repairs by
Fred Flack, M.A.E.S.

HI-PI, PHONO 7'V, and .'radio rej
Clip this ad for free pickup and
livery. Campus Radio and TV, 32
Hoover. NO 5-6644.
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGQ
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-18
Leave Nov. 1. NO 8-6037.

2200 Fuller Road Near North Cam-
pus and VA Hospital
Phone NOrmandy 3-0800, 5-9161
OST &TOUND
LOST: Ladies gold watch with black
band, on or near campus. Reward.
Call Margie, NO 3-3384. A23
LOST: a Signet 40 Camera in 4068 Friese
Bldg. Contact Stuart at NO 2-1807.
Reward. A9
TWO GIRLS' Raleigh bikes-$30 each.;
1424 Iroquois. NO 2-0987. Z18
STUDIO, 800 sq. ft., Music, Dance, Re-
At.in Cam ir a rvp- --.mh ..ea

1957 ENGLISH FORD $255. Call NO 2-
4401. 303 Chicago. N29
FORD 1957 "500" coupe. Completely re-
conditioned.NO 3-9760 after 5. N30
1958 RAMBLER AMERICAN. Snow tires,
radio, heater, standard shift. Only
$700. Call FI 9-3569. N31

IS YOUR
ALL-AMERICAN
YEARBOOK

1960 MG-A "1600"
1959 SPRITE
1960 SPRITE
1956 MG-A
1959 RENAULT DAUPHINE
1958 VW CONVERTIBLE

WANTED-Four tickets for Fridayn
Soph Show. NO 5-7711, Ext. 1224
WANTED Ride to Erie, Pa., soon
12 p.m. Wed. 11/22. Just off roa
Buffalo. Call Craw at NO 2-5571.

Earn university credits while enjoying
summer in Hawaii. Price includes steam.
ship outbound, jet return to West Coast
Wilcox Hall residence on campus, anti
greatest diversification of parties, din.
ners, entertainment, sightseeing,
cruises, beach events, and cultural
shows; plus necessary tour services.
Air or steamship roundtrip, and Waikiki
apartment-hotel residence available at
adjusted tour rates. Optional neighbor
island visits and return via Seattle
World's Fair.
E My STUDY
ORIENT TOUR
SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE
$ CREDITS-UNIV. SUMMER SESSION
76 DAVc . $_-"-sii

NEW CARS

MG-A "1600" MK II
Austin-Healey "3000" MKII
SPRITE MKII

C-TED STANDARD SERVI
FRIENDLY SERVICE IS OUR BUSN
It is fall change over time. Tim
check your cooling system and pu
ATLAS PERMA-GUARD anti-fre

OVERSEAS IMPORTED CARS
331 South 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
Ann Arbor
V2

South University &£Fo
NO 8-9168

- - oETfl' 1I HMVI -

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