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November 15, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-15

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IER15, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Commission Suspects
High Katanga Officials
Of Lumumba's Murder
SPENDING: Believe Men
President To Cut Turned Over
Civil Service Costs TTsbormbe

Finnish President Calls :ADENAUER ANGERED:

Parliamentary Elections

Kroll Defends Berlin Project

WASHINGTON () -- President
John F. Kennedy ordered govern-
ment offices outside Washington
yesterday to strengthen "signifi-
cantly" their coordination and to
mesh more closely their experi-
ence and resources to do a better
job and save money.
To kick off this project, he
directed the Civil Service Com-
mission to establish a board of
federal executives in each of the
commission's 10 administrative
regions, without hiring extra peo-
ple for the assignment.
The order is a follow-up to an
Oct. 26 general directive by Ken-
nedy to his cabinet and agency
heads to be "careful and frugal"
in their spending to help cut down
this year's deficit and balance
next year's budget.
Kennedy called then for post-
poning programs that normally
would be desirable, halting spend-
ing programs undertaken to com-
bat the recession and holding down
the number of government work-
ers to the minimum needed.
In response to the President's
new order, Chairman John W.
Macy Jr. of the Civil Service Com-
mission said he had directed that
boards be set up immediately in,
the headquarter cities of the 10
regions-in Boston, New York,
Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, St.
Louis, Dallas, Denver, San Fran-
Cisco and Seattle.
Kennedy's order noted that 90
per cent of all federal employes
work outside the National Capi-
tal area.
"Most important," Kennedy
added, "federal officials outside of
Washington provide the principal
day-to-day contact of the govern-
ment with the citizens of the
country and generally constitute
the actual point of contact of fed-
eral programs with the economy
and other phases of our national
life,"

JOHN F. KENNEDY
.. . civil service
MILITARY AID:

Release Report to UN;
Call Council Meeting
UNITED NATIONS (P) - A
United Nations investigating com-
mission expressed belief yesterday
Patrice Lumumba, the fiery Con-
go leader, was murdered last Jan-
uary in the presence of high Ka-
tanga officials and his fate kept
secret for almost a month.
The commission declared lead-
ers of the Central Congo govern-
ment must share responsibility,
since they turned Lumumba and
two associates over to the Katan-'
ga authorities "knowing full well
that in doing so they were throw-
ing them into the hands of their
bitterest political enemies."
There is a "great deal of sus-
picion," the commission added,
that the actual perpetrator of
Lumumba's murder, . in accord
with a prearranged plan, was a
Belgian colonel who served as a
mercenary in the Katanga armed
forces.
Eyewitnesses to the deaths were
probably Katanga Premier Moise
Tshombe and two chief aides,
Godefroid Munongo and Jean-
Baptiste Kibwe, the commission
said.
Munongo, the Katanga interior
minister, was described as play-
ing 'a leading role in the plot lead-
ing to the deaths.
The report was released in ad-
vance of a meetingdof the UN
Security Council today on the
Congo to consider African de-
mands for strong UN action to
end the secession of Katanga.
The four-man commission saidl
it was barred by the central gov-
errnment from visiting the Congo.
It based its findings on testi-
mony taken from witnesses at
hearings in New York, Brussels
and Geneva, and from documents
and other material made avail-
able to the commission by the UN
Secretariat.

HELSINGFORS, Finland W )-
President Urho Kekkonen yester-
day dissolved parliament and an-
nounced new parliamentary elec-
tions in February.e
The action came after Foreign
Minister Ahti Kajkalainen inform-
ed the government that Russia-
has asked Finland to provide
prompt assurances of continued
friendly relations with the Soviet
Union or enter into joint defense
talks.
Kekkonen said the present in-_
ternational tension demanded de-
cisions, that cannot wait until
after the regular parliamentary
elections due next summer.
He added: "As it is possible to
create conditions for fruitful na-
tional cooperation only by turn-t
ing directly to the people of Fin-
land, I ask that the parliamentt
be dissolved and new elections beE
held on Feb. 4-5."
Kekkonen himself is the strong-f
est candidate for presidentiali
elections previously scheduled for
next July.j
Kajkalainen returned Monday
night from Moscow where he had.
sought more information on al
Russian note of Oct. 30 askingl
for joint defense consultations.
After he reported to the gov-
ernment, the Finnish foreign min-
istry put out a communique sum-
ming up his talks with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromy-
ko.
The Soviet note cited an alleg-
ed military threat to Russia from1
West Germany and had accusedE
Finland's Scandinavian neighbors
of being involved in the threat.t
Yesterday's communique -- is-t
Reuither SaySt
Union Still Split
WASHINGTON (P) - Walter<
Reuther reported bitterly yester-t
day that the AFL-CIO has failedi
to solve its internal problems andt
the six-year-old merged labore
movement is "united in name
only."
Reuther, president of the auto
workers union, made it clear in a
new survey of AFL-CIO problems
that it has only been because of
his preoccupation with auto in-1
dustry contract negotiations this
summer and fall that there hasj
been a respite in open feuding
between rival wings of the federa-
tion.
The rival groups are building up'
for a clash of forces at the AFL-
CIO convention to be held in
Miami Beach in early December.

sued after details were reported to
parliament, quoted Gromyko as
saying Russia had "not the slight-
est intention of intervening in
Finland's domestic affairs."
Rebel Lea der
To continue
Hunger Strike
PARIS (M)-Mohammed Ben Bel-
la, vice premier of the Algerian
rebel regime, and two rebel min-
isters were reported last night de-
termined to carry their 13-day-
old hunger strike "to the end."
The three captured leaders sip-]
ped mineral water and conserv-
ed their strength in a well-guard-
ed hospital near Paris. French!
authorities said the three walked
to their rooms in the hospital with
firm steps and there was no cause
for alarm over their condition.
Ben Bella and ministers Hus-
sein Ait Ahmed and Mohammed
Khider were transferred to the
hospital during the night, from
their imprisonment in a Loire
Valley chateau after doctors re-
ported they were in poor health
because of the fast they launched
to pressure the French. The three
and two other rebel leaders were
captured in October, 1956, when
their plane, on a flight from Ra-'
bat, Morocco, to Tunis, was forc-
ed down by the French.
A group of attorneys visited the
three in the hospital. They said
their clients protested the trans-
fer from the .chateau, were de-
termined to "pursue the strike to
the end" and to refuse all medical
aid. -
French penitentiary authorities
said if they continue the strike
another 10 or 12 days their con-
dition may become grave. Should
they lapse into a coma, full med-
ical measures would be taken for
their recovery, the officials add-
ed.

BONN MP)-Ambassador _Hans
Kroll told Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer last night that his proposals
to Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev on Berlin were ad-
vanced as his own thoughts and
not authorized by the West Ger-
man government, a communique
announced.
The official version followed
angry 'public denials from Kroll
that he had overstepped his au-
thority in talks with Khrushchev
in Moscow.
Adenauer had summarily order-
ed Kroll back from Moscow to,
face government accusations that
he had misrepresented Bonn's po-
sition.
Personal Thoughts
The communique said Kroll, a
long-time diplomat who has serv-
ed in Moscow for the past three
years, had expressed only his own
thoughts on the German and Ber-
lin problems during his meeting
with Khrushchev last Thursday.
''These were not authorized by'
the West German government,"
the communique said.
There was no indication wheth-
U1.S.Suggests
Lifting Penalty
WASHINGTON W--The United
States recommended yesterday
the partial lifting of inter-Ameri-
can sanctions against the Domin-
ican Republic.
The recommendation was made
by Robert F. Woodward, assistant
secretary of state for inter-Amer-.
ican affairs in a speech to a
committee of the Organization of
American States (OAS). The com-
mittee took no action on the pro-
posal but voted to meet again
Thursday.
The nine-nation committee al-
so received a report from a four-
member subcommittee which has
been conducting investigations on
conditions in the Dominican Re-
public.

World News Roundup

er Kroll would lose his Job be- on the basis of a common undi
cause of the furor that blew up standing."
over the proposals he suggested Kroll told reporters that he mi
to the Soviet premier. hold back the details of his ta
Reassure Allies with Khrushchev but said the co
In an apparent attempt to re- versation had two purposes:i
assure West Germany's allies that quire into the Soviet attitude.
Kroll's proposals for a new status Kroll, in the German diploma
for West Berlin did not represent service since 1920 and envoy
a one-sided attempt by Bonn to Moscow for the last three yes
reach agreement with the Com- drove directly from Cologne
munists, the communique added: Bonn for his meeting with Ae
"The government will continue, nauer. The government has in
together with its Western part- cated Adenauer would deci
ners, to seek for a solution to whether Kroll would return
the German and Berlin questions Moscow.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The Defense
Department issued yesterday a
pre-Christmas draft call for 16,-
000 men, all for Army service.
The number for December is
4,000 fewer than the 20,000 each
called for October and November,
and 9,000 below that for Septem-
ber.
*, * *
MOSCOW-The seventh Soviet
Antarctic expedition sailed yes-
terday from Leningrad aboard the
diesel-electric research vessel Ob.
* * *
WASHINGTON-The small na-
tions of Latin America joined the
United States yesterday to keep
alive a Colombian plan for diplo-
matic action against Communist
intervention in this hemisphere
through Cuba.
* * *
RANGOON-Five persons were
killed and 20 seriously injured

yesterday in a clash between pc
lice and a crowd of 2,000 Buddl
ists. The police opened fire on ti
crowd.
The violence followed an ai
tempt by Buddhists to burn dow
two Moslem mosques. They ha
previously protested to the goi
erment for permitting the moi
lues to be built in an area whet
the Buddhists wanted monastei
ies.
Police said 371 persons were a
rested, including 92 monks, Arrl
ored cars reinforced police
guarding the fire - damage
mosques.
NEW YORK-The stock mark
staged a churning advance to ne
highs yesterday. Trading was ve:
heavy with 4.75 million shares s
compared with 4.54 million Mor
day. The Associated Press ave
age rose 1.8 to 268.5 and the Dov
Jones average set a new all-tin
high of 736.65, closing up 4.15.

U.S. To Help
South Korea
If Necessary
WASHINGTON (P) - President
John F. Kennedy yesterday prom-
ised South Korea aid "including
the use of armed forces if there
is a renewal of armed attack."
He assured Gen. Chung Hee
Park, South Korea's military
strongman leader, that the Unit-
ed States government will con-
tinue to extend all possible eco-
nomic aid and cooperation to fur-
ther a long range development of
the nation for which United States
troops fought a decade ago.

TOMORROW, 8:30 P.M. at H ILLEL

TED- LURIE

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Distinguished editor if Jerusalem Post
and Foreign Correspondent speaks on
"Land Flowing in Words' and Honey"

HILLEL FOUNDATION, 1429 Hill Street

I'

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,t .'

f

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ACWR's Department of Studies on the United Nations
presents:
AN INTRODUCTORY PANEL DISCUSSION ON

I

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" "Its Contribution to Peace"-Prof. Kenneth Boulding
0 "As A Unique Educational Concept"-Prof. John

S.

Brubacher

* "Its Contribution to International Studies"-Dr. Elton McNeil
. "Its Contribution to Economic and Social Development"-Prof. Richard L. Meier
A REPORT ON THE UN UNIVERSITY PUBLISHED BY THE DEPARTMENT WILL BE DISTRIBUTED.
ATWENTY-SESSION SEMINAR IS SCHEDULED FOR EVERY TUESDAY BEGINNING NOVEMBER 28.
APPLICATION BLANKS FOR THIS SEMINAR WILL ALSO BE AVAILABLE AT THE MEETING.

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BER 19,

1961

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