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November 14, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IDA94-0

U.S., Great Britan et
Invitation to Russians

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To Res
Slim Chance
Of Russian
Acceptane
West Desires Treaty
On Nuclear Test Ban
WASHINGTON (R)-The United
States and Great Britain urged'
the, Soviet Union yesterday to re-'
turn to the Geneva conference ta-'
ble and resume the nuclear test
ban talks which ran aground
nearly two months ago.
There was little, if any, hope
that Moscow will accept the invi-
tation, That the chances are slim
was indicated last week by Valer-
ian Zorin, chief Soviet delegate to
the United Nations, who said a.
test ban treaty must be worked
out within the framework of gen-
eral disarmament.
Talks Recessed
The three-year-long tripartite
talks were recessed Sept. 9, to give
the UN General Assembly a chance
to discuss the issue,
The United States note said the
world organization has completed
its debate by adopting a resolu-
tion calling for resumption of the
talks. Therefore, the note went on,
the United States proposes that
the discussions should continue
starting Nov. 28, or on any other
date agreeable to the Soviets.
Talks Stall
The Geneva talks became stall-
ed when the Russians resumed
testing in the atmosphere on Sept.
-1.
Since then Russia has exploded
more than 30 nuclear devices in
what the State Department called
"the single most intensive testing
program in history." It included 25
and 55-megaton superbombs-the
mightiest ever touched off.
Bonn Recalls
Ambassador
From Moscow
BONN WA) -- Veteran German
Diplomat Hans Kroll yesterday
faced possible removal from his
post as ambassador to Moscow in
the backlash of his talk with
Premier Nikita Khrushchev on the
Berlin crisis.
Kroll allegedly made at least
two proposals that do not repre-
sent the West German govern-
ment's position.
The two proposals correspond
with what press reports from Mos-
cow said last week were a new So-
viet plan for ending tension over
Berlin:
1) A four-power agreement on
the status of West Berlin and ac-
cess to it from West Germany.
2) An arrangement between the
Soviet Union and Communist East
Germany to guarantee this agree-
ment.

ume

Test Talks

Recruiting Problems Hit
Peace Corps Plans Again

Congolese Appeal to UN
To Help Fight Katanga
UNITED NATIONS (MP-The Central Congo government yester-
day demanded effective aid from the United Nations to put an end to
what it called chaos stirred up by Katanga Premier Moise Tshombe.
Justin Bomboko, the Congolese foreign minister, denounced
Tshombe as a traitor who was responsible for the division of The
Congo.
Bomboko addressed the 11-nation Security Council as it met for
the first time since last February to consider events in The Congo.
Bomboko made no specific request for UN military assistance for the
Congolese army in a campaign
aimed at ending Katanga's 16-
month-old defiance of the central To Bolster
But Ethiopian Ambassador Tes-
faye Gebre-Egzy declared it wass
up to the council to issue explicitW est Forces
orders to its UN Congo command
to support the central govern- PARIS ( ) - Western ground
ment's efforts to end the Katanga forces will be 25 per cent stronger
secession. than in 1960 in Central Europe
Ethiopia, Nigeria and Sudan by the end of this year, Gen. Lau-
had asked for the meeting to con- ris Norstad, supreme allied com-
sider what action could be taken mander, declared yesterday.
to deal with mercenaries they said And Army Secretary Elvis J.
were still causing trouble in The Stahr, Jr., reported a military
Congo. buildup at home permits the dis-
Liberia, supported by the Unit- patch of 40,000 additional men to
ed States and Great Britain, pro- reinforce the United States 7th
posed without opposition that the Army in Europe. Six more divi-
council consider all aspects of the sions in the United States are
Congo situation. ready to move instantly to any
The Western powers were re- trouble spot on earth, he added.
ported against any council action Rising Strength
which would direct the UN forces This picture of rising allied
to join with the Congolese army strength in the face of Soviet
in an offensive against Katanga. threats to Berlin was presented

By STERLING F. GREEN
Associated Press staff writer
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy has decided to take
the giant-stride route to a new
American tariff policy, in step
with the thriving European Com-
mon Market..
The move could plunge him into
the roughest legislative fight of his
presidency. If his timing is off,

AMERICAN TARIFF POLICY:
Kennedy Nears Daring Trade Program

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the kind from which lawmakers
recoil, one affecting the Jobs of
some voters and the earnings of
some businessmen and campaign
contributors.
Kennedy is convinced that the
trade agreements act, expiring
June 30, must not only be renewed
but should be rewritten into a
more potent long-term instrument
of foreign policy and trade ex-
pansion.
Negotiating Authority
To keep the export lanes open
to this country and its good neigh-
bors in Latin America and the Far
East, Kennedy wants authority to
negotiate give-and-take tariff cuts
on whole groups of commodities
and with entire blocs of countries.
The product-by-product, month-
by-month, dickering over tariffs
and quotas now required by the
law has been outmoded, the ad-
ministration contends, by the
emergence of the common market
concept.
While removing their internal

trade barriers - andsexpanding
trade among themselves by 50 per
cent in the process-the six com-
mon market countries are erecting
a uniform tariff wall against ex
ports of the United States and
other outsiders. Their manufac
turers, meanwhile, are giving thi
country ever-stiffening competi
tion in non-Europeon markets, in.
cluding the United States itself.
Inrecent weeks Great Britain
Ireland and Denmark have ap-
plied to join the original six. Nor.
way may follow. Thus Western Eu.
rope shapes up into a potentia
unified market of 250 million peo-
ple with United States exporters
looking in from outside.
"Our allies in Europe are n(
longer dealing in item-by-item
terms, and we must adapt our ne-
gotiating authority accordingly,'
said the provocative bipartisan re-
port filed Nov. 2 with a House
foreign economic affairs subcom-
mittee.

WASHINGTON - The Peace
Corps has recruiting troubles
again.
This time it is not a shortage
of applicants but a shortage of
specialists needed for specific proj-
ects overseas.
To date, the corps, headed by
R. Sargent ShriversJr., has re-
ceived 14,354 applications. Al-
most 8,000 applicants have taken
entrance tests. Several thousand
more are expected to report for
the next nation-wide examina-
tions on Nov. 28 and Nov. 29.
Minor Dent
But the shortage of needed
talents has already put a minor
dent in Peace Corps planning. For
example, lack of farm experts re-
cently forced the corps to cancel
agricultural parts of two overseas
projects.
Also .in short supply are con-
struction hands, medical techni-
cians and heavy-equipment oper-
ators.
Another planning problem is the
tendency of would-be volunteers
on college campuses to delay send-

ferred to other projects. Peace
Corps officials are satisfied so far
with this attrition rate.
The bulk of applications come
from college students or gradu-
ates with liberal arts backgrounds.
After intensive training, these
persons make highly useful vol-
unteers, particularly in the teach-
ing assignments that now consti-
tute the majority of corps proj-
ects overseas.
Complicating the build-up and
the recruiting - selection - training
process are requests from foreign
governments for certain special-
ists in small groups. These spe-
cialists are hard to find.
Copyright, 1961, The New York Times

Presentation and Discussion

JOHN F. KENNEDY
new tariff

ing in their applications.
Said Thomas Quimby,
Corps recruiting chief:
Apply Now

Peace

"If a person plans to go to
work for us in June, he should
be applying to us now."
Over-all, the corps has largely
met the goal set by President John
F. Kennedy when he set up the
corps last March-500 to 1,000
volunteers overseas or in train-
ing by 1962. Seventeen projects
in a dozen countries have been
scheduled.
Seven hundred $75-a-month
volunteers are overseas or in train-
ing. Some 250 more will start
training at colleges in January.
Screened Out
One out of two eligible Peace
Corps applicants accepts the
agency's callto start training -
usually within a few days or weeks.
About 15 per cent of those train-
ing are "screened out" or trans-

world News, Roundup,
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The United States deficit in international pay-
ments climbed to an annual rate of slightly more than $3 billion a
year in the third quarter, the Commerce Department announced yes-
terday.
* * * *
POINT ARGUELLO-Three pounds of living matter-ranging
from fresh-drawn human blood to sea urchin eggs-will be rocketed
tomorrow into the mysterious radiation belt that surrounds the earth.
* * * *
NEW DELHI-India charged yesterday that Polish members of
the three-nation truce team in South Viet Nam are being hampered
by the Vietnamese government.
* * * *
DAMASCUS-The interim government yesterday called for a
nationwide election Dec. 1 to name the first constituent assembly
since Syria's break from union with Egypt.
LANSING-Ten candidates-seven Republicans and three Demo-
crats-filed before the 4 p.m. deadline yesterday in the contest to
fill the state senatorial seat vacated by the death of Sen. Charles T.
Prescott (R-Prescott).
NEW YORK-The stock market, as measured by the popular
averages, climbed to an all-time peak yesterday., The Associated Press
average rose 1.60 to 266.70. The Dow-Jones average pushed up 3.60 to
728.43. Its previous peak was 726.5g.

at the opening of, the Seventh
Annual Conference of Parliamen-
tarians from the 15 nations al-
lied in the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization.
Dirk U. Stikker, NATO secre-
tary-general, declared that in
case of an all-out nuclear attack
against the alliance "the reply
should be immediate with all the
weapons available." He urged a
"hard-boiled" attitude in dealing
with the Russians, saying they
want no nuclear war now either.
Conventional Forces
The emphasis on the Allied
buildup, however, was on conven-
tional forces. President John F.
Kennedy sent a message declaring
he believed ground forces prob-
ably are as important to allied
defense now as at any time in
NATO history.'
Filipinos Prepare
For Voting Today
MANILA OP)-Filipinos vote to-
day in the fifth presidential elec-
tion of this young Asian repub-
lic after a bitter and violent cam-
paign that took an official toll of
22 lives. More than 16,000 police
constabulary and army troops
were ordered out to guard the
polls.

diately after the session opens on
Jan. 10.
Unfavorable Omens
The omens are not favorable,
on the surface. Congress members
want a short, non-controversial
session because 1962 is an elec-
tion year. '
The session may be short, but
if Kennedyacts it will be loaded
with controversy. The issue is of
some officials believe, he risks a
defeat that could set back his
trade expansion program for years.
Kennedy indicated last week hey
believes the right time is now-
meanin gthat he should present
his proposals to Congress imme-
Diamond
Needles
$4e98;
guaranteed
one year
Record Department
State Street at North U.

NUCLEAR POLICY,

S

E

DR. DONALD KEYS,
Program Director
SANE Nuclear Policy,' Inc.

AND

8 P.M., Tuesday, Nov. 14
3510 Student Activities Building

Sponsored
The Office

by Challenge and
of Religious Affairs

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dark! Tie ets

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--.....

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GIRLS
Career Panel
and Discussion,
TODAY
4-5:15
Multipurpose Room
UGLI 3rd Floor
Professiors for Women
Nursing
Med. Tech.
Psych. and
Med. Soc. work
Dental Hygiene

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