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November 04, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-11-04

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EMBER 4,1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Adenauer

Develops
Coalition

Pact
State

For
Recognition
Still Sought
By Ulbricht
Communist Leader
Outlines Settlement
BERLIN tm)--Walter Ulbricht,
Communist leader in East Ger-
Many, came back from Moscow
yesterday insisting he wants rec-
ognition from the United States
and other Western powers for his
satellite regime.
His short airport speech was
peaceful in tone, however. He did
not say, as he has in the past,
that he would get what lie wants
by separate peace treaty with So-
viet Russia by the end of the year.
Soviet Premier Nikita Khrush-
ch'ev has lifted that particular
deadline.
(Khrushchev was quoted in
Moscow as saying he wants ne-
gotiations on Berlin and "we un-
derstand that negotiations mean
not only gettinig but giving.")
Ulbricht also said talks between
Washington and Moscow had
shown that negotiations for a
peaceful settlement on Berlin and
Germany are possible.
But he outlined a settlement
that the West already has refus-
ed.
"We are for a step-by-step re-
duction of Western troops: and
for the regulation of the use of
access routes of the German Dem-
ocratic Republic in accordance
with international law, through
agreements between it and the
countries concerned, as well as
with the neutral and independent
city of West Berlin," Ulbricht
said.
In that one sentence Ulbricht
packed a whole series of Commu-
nist proposals that the West has
rejected: creation of a "free city
of West Berlin," recognition of,
Ulbricht's German Democratic
Republic and acceptance by the
West of its authority over land,
water and air routes between iso-
lated West Berlin and the outside
world.
Count's Home
Hit by Bomb
PARIS (M-A plastic bomb ex-
ploded last night at the suburban
mansion of the Count of Paris,
pretender to the non-existent
throne of France causing consid-
erable property damage but no
injuries.

ew

(i

Hattie Brings Looters

-AP Wirephoto
STORE LOOTERS--A throng of hungry men, women and chil-
dren search through a Belize general store for loot in the wake
of Hurricane Hattie whose high winds and tides devastated the
British Honduras capital. Store shelves were picked bare min-
utes after the crowd broke in.
U. S. STILL AHEAD
Nuc lear Weapons 'Gap'
Affects Testing Po~olcy
*s *

WASHINGTON (-) - Another
"gap" figures significantly in
President John F. Kennedy's get-
ready polipy on testing nuclear
weapons in the air.
In this case, Kennedy has de-
clared the United States continues
to hold a lead between its nu-
clear strength and the corres-
ponding power of any other na-
tion, including the Soviet Union.
This country, he indicated, will
resume atmospheric testing if it
finds that Russia is narrowing-
or threatens to narrow-that gap.
With the current series of So-
viet tests, Kennedy in effect ac-
knowledged this week that Russia
may be making advances. But
this does not mean the world can
expect an early United States
shot into the atmosphere. None
should be expected for months-
not this year nor early next.
Officials close to the subject
note that the preparations Ken-
nedy ordered on Thursday cannot
be made immediately. Conclusions
also must be reached on the na-
ture and achievements of the So-
viet tests, which apparently have

not ended, and on what purposes
the United States may want to ex-
plore.
These probably will include per-
fection of warheads and anti-
missile weapons.
Declaring the United States is
"many times" ahead in the nu-
clear gap, Kennedy emphasized in
his policy announcement that "it
is essential to the defense of the
free world that we maintain this
relative position."
Physicist Says
Bombs Effect
Little Fallout
JACKSON, Miss. (P) - Nuclear
Physicist A. D. Suttle, Jr. told
President John F. Kennedy yes-
terday the large United States nu-
clear bombsa6 to 10 times cleaner
than Russia's, could be tested
without any real fallout threat.
He urged Kennedy in a tele-
gram to push atmospheric testing
to protect the nation and develop
a cleaner bomb for peaceful pur-
poses.
Suttle, director of the Mississip-
pi Research Commission, said
some of the nuclear bombs in the
United States stockpile were 95
per cent free of materials that
produce radioactive fallout.
The scientist said the rate of
fallout of tests conducted near
the Equator was much less than
blasts near the Polar Cap.
If the United States tested in
the Pacific zone, he said, much
more of the limited fallout would
decay in the upper atmosphere
before the population was exposed.
Suttle said it was the policy of
the Atomic Energy Commission
and its contractors to develop

Faces Fight
In Own Party
Over Plans
Agreement Reached
With Free Democrats
By The Associated Press
BONN-Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer yesterday pitched up a com-
promise agreement for a new co-
alition government with the Free
Democrats, but he faces a show-
down today in his restless Chris-
tian Democratic Party on wheth-
er the pact is acceptable.
The plan worked out with the
small, conservative and national-
ist Free Democratic Party must
be approved by a majority of the
242 Christian Democrat members
of the Bundestag (parliament).
Many Christian Democrats were
saying openly that the 85-year-old
chancellor sacrificed their inter-
ests to stay in office.
Committee Approves
The steering committee of the
Christian Democrats in parliament
unanimously approved the new
compromise last night, however.
Political circles were predicting
Adenauer will be elected to a
fourth term by the Bundestag,
probably on Tuesday.
Adenauer, the only chancellor
this country has known in its 12-
year history, agreed to go along
with the Free Democrats to get
their support for his re-election.
He can no longer rely exclusively
on his own Christian Democratic
party since it lost its majority in
the Sept. 17 general election.
After only a brief meeting, he
was reported to have offered Erich
Mende's Free Democrats five min-
istries, although they hold only
67 of the Bundestag's 499 seats,
and promised to resign some time
before his new term expires.
Allies Pressure Adenauer
Adenauer was said to be under
discreet pressure from the Western
Allies to settle the political stale-
mate so that concerted action
could be taken toward a settle-
ment of the Berlin crisis.
President Heinrich Luebke, who
must propose a chancellor to the
Bundestag, made no secret of his
impatience. He was reported ready
to bring forward the name of some
other Christian Democrats as
chancellor if a decision was not
reached by this weekend.
Supporters of Economics Minis-
ter Ludwig Erhard began cam-
paigning for him. A recent poll in-
dicated that 70 per cent of the
West German public favor his
taking over the chancellorship.
He stands so high with the Free
Democrats that they would enter
a government under him without
any spelled out agreement to pro-
tect their position.
Taylor Reports
On Viet Nam Trip
WASHINGTON P)-Gen. Max-
well D. Taylor was reported to
have told President John F. Ken-
nedy yesterday that the Vietna-
mese people need greater confi-
dence and higher morale to meet
the threat of Communist guerril-
la attacks. The general visited the
White House shortly after return-
ing from Viet Nam, where he had

'CIVIL WAR':
UN Officer
Raps Action
Of Tshombe
UNITED NATIONS (') - The
chief United Nations officer in the
Congo lashed out yesterday at Ka-
tanga Premier Moise Tshombe's
government, accusing it of taking
"offensive civil war action" against
the central regime in Leopold-
ville.
Sture Linner, the Swedish chief,
made the statement in a strongly
worded report to the UN Secur-
ity Council. UN officials here said
it indicated possible UN air ac-
tion against Tshombe's forces.
Linner said last week's bomb-I
ing by two Katanga planes of cen-
tral government troops and instal-
lations in Kasai province violated
a cease-fire agreement. He stress-
ed that the UN forces are empow-
ered by Security Council directive
to use force if necessary to avoid
civil war in the Congo.
Tshombe said he was justified,
however, in ordering the planes
into action. He said they bombed
only bases in Kasai from which
troops of the central government
were operating.

Commenting on the recipients
of the 1961 Nobel Prize for phys-
ics, Prof. David M. Dennison,
chairman of the physics depart-
ment, called both winners "very
eminent physicists."
The 1961 ,prize in physics is
shared by Professors Robert Hof-
stadter of Stanford University for
his studies of electron scatterings
in atomic nuclei and Rudolf L.
Moessbauer of Munich, now at the
California Institute of Technolo-
gy, for research into gamma rays.
Prof. Dennison met Prof. Moess-
bauer at a scientific conference
last year in Detroit. "Despite his
youth, I found him to be a very
able and original physicist," he
said.
"What an awakening!" said Dr.
Hofstadter, head of the physics
department at Stanford, when he
heard the news while visiting in
Royal Oak. "It is the thing a
scientist dreams about but never
gets."
Prof. Melvin Calvin was award-
ed the Nobel Prize for chemistry
for his research on the mechan-
ism of photosynthesis, the process
whereby plants convert carbon
dioxide and water into food.

Prof. Leigh C. Anderson, head
of the chemistry department, not-
ed that Prof. Calvin is outstand-
ing in the field of chemistry.
"I am sure Dr. Calvin's work
ranks as one of the outstanding
accomplishments of modern sci-
ence," Prof. Anderson said.

I,. -

.. .

'U' Scientists Praise
Nobel Prize Winners

C "6O

7(C)

Cl I ft C H
SABr BATrH

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
- Phone'NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer. Bob Marshall:
"A Humanist Looks at Historic
Christianity"
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAY-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11 :00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.

r nlE

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR

SERVICES:

9:00
10:30
11:50

ATLANTIC:
Submarine
Launches
3 Rockets
CAPE CANAVERAL (/P)-Op
ating with almost split-seco
precision, the nuclear submar'
Ethan Allen successfully launcr
three advanced Polaris miss
from beneath the Atlantic oce
in less than three hours yest
day.
The stubby rockets rode colun
of compressed air to the surf
at 9:02 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and No
The first stage engines igni
above the water and the sece
stages fired a minute later to p
pel the nose cones more th
1,500 miles to a target area n(
the West Indies Island of Antig
The first rocket blasted off I
minutes behind its planned sc
dule. The second and third scoo
skyward right on time. The f
ings were conducted near Gra
Bahama island, about 300 i
southeast of Cape Canaveral.
This leaves the Ethan All
newest and largest of the Pola
submarines, with an untarnis]
five - for - five launching rec
since its arrival last month to I
the longer-range A2 Polaris.

Henry Kuizenga
Henry Kuizenga
David Van Winkle

FWorld News Roundup'

ROBERT HOFSTADTER
... Nobel laureate

By The Associated Press
OTTAWA-Charles B. Limbrick,
a Canadian missile and radar ex-
pert, said yesterday he believes
the Soviet Union has perfected an
antiradiation drug.
He said that in such circum-
stances Russia can detonate many
more nuclear bombs, lure the West
into testing its own nuclear weap-
ons
He told a reporter that West-
ern nations for some years have
known that Russia was "on the
track- of a chemical pill or sub-
stance to offset most of radiation
sickness effects."
* * * '
WASHINGTON-Mrs. Jacque-
line Kennedy, wife of the Presi-
dent, will leave around Nov. 20
for a visit of about two weeks to
India and Pakistan, the White
House announced yesterday.
The announcement said that
the First Lady is going to the two
countries "in a private and per-
sonal capacity" for the purpose of
visiting educational and research
centers
NAIROBI -- Jomo "Burning
Spear" Kenyatta, the Kenya na-
tionalist leader, will fly to Lon-
don tomorrow to demand inde-
pendence for the colony by 1962.
* *
BUDAPEST - Josep Cardinal
Mindszenty yesterday finished the
fifth year of his virtual, imprison-
ment behind the walls of the
United States.legation overlooking
the square named Freedom Place.
It was five years ago today that
the Roman Catholic primate of
Hungary sought asylum as Soviet
tanks, squatting like giant toads
- - *-1

across Budapest -streets, finally
crushed the 1956 Hungarian up-
rising.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS - United
States and British spokesmen re-
iterated yesterday that their gov-
ernments are willing to resume
immediately negotiations at Ge-
neva on a nuclear test ban.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
staged a churning, irregular ad-
vance in active trading yesterday.
Gains of fractions to a point or
so among key stocks outnumbered
losers.

CAMPUS CENTER
Services: 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. Guest speaker,
Arthur R. McKay, President of McCormick
Theological Seminary, Chicago, Illinois.
"The Wisdom of God's Foolishness."
11:30 Malcolm Brown, "The Church in the
World."
SUNDAY-
9:30-10:20 a.m. "Scrutinizing the Christian
Faith," Guild House, 802 Monroe St.
10:30-11:30 a.m. "The Book of Revelation"
Presbyterian Campus Center.
11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour, Presbyterian Campus
Center.
6:30 p.m. Quest and Question, Presbyterian
Campus Center.
TUESDAY-
12:11-1 :00 "Topics of Ultimate Concern",
Luncheon at the Guild House.
9:00-11:00 p.m. "TEA and TEAology" 217
S. Observatory.
THURSDAY-
12:10-12:40 p.m. "0 Come Let Us Worship"
Douglas Chapel, 608 E. William.
FRIDAY-
12:00-1:00 "Topics of Immediate Concern,"
Luncheon at the Guild House.
6:15 p.m. Grad Group, Dinner and Program,
Speaker this week: Jack Borckardt, "Are
We Stuck With John Calvin?"
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom,Campus Minister
NOVEMBER 5, 1961
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
"You Must Pay the Price." Sermon by Dr.
Rupert. The service is broadcast at 11:15
A.M. on station WOIA.
10:15 A.M. Seminar on World Understanding:
Kenya. Leader, Aron Kandia from Kenya,
Africa.
5:30 Fellowship Supper.
7:00 Worship and Program: "Why I Believe
in God." Dr. Robert Fox, Prof. of Ed. Dis-
cussion following, presentation.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast in the Pine Room. Dismissal in
time for 8 A.M. classes.
4-5 P.M. Midweek Refresher.
7:00 P.M. Class on the Christian Faith. Pine
Room.
7:00 f.M. Study Group on Contemporary
Theologians. The apartment.
8:30-11:00 P.M. Open House at J. Robe's,
apartment for students. (Under Wesley
Lounge).
FRIDAYS-
5:30 P.M. Wesley Grads supper in the Pine
Room. Please call 8-6881 for reservations
by Thursday noon.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 A.M. "How Much Is
Money Worth?" Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
10:20-10:40 Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs.
Church School: ages crib through High School.
9:30-10:40 and 11:00-12:00.
Student Guild: 820 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
WEST SIDE METHODIST
900 S. Seventh St.
Since 1846
9:30 and 11:00 Services. Dr. Whited, preach-
ing "Living Faith" at both services; during
the 11:00 service it will be on the air over

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alyf red T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
"The Joint Venture of Faith" (Holy Com-
munion in both services)
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible study groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper & Program. "How God's
Bank Works," Mr. Marvin Heinitz, Guest
Speaker.
Wednesday at 8:15 Chapel Assembly.
Wednesday at 10:00: Midweek Evening Devo-
tion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, .Pastor
Miss Anna Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY-
9:00 A.M. Worship Service and Communion
10: A.M. Bible Study
11 :00 A.M. Morning Worship
7:00 P.M. Vesper Service of Dietrich Bux-
tehude Abendmusik-Instrumental Music
and Cantata "Jesu, Meine Freude," Solo-
ists and Instrumentalists from School and
The Chapel Choir.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 Sunday School
11:00 Morning Worship
"Invitation to Prayer."
5:30 Student Guild
5:4 Youth Group
1r evening Service
"'Lvng By the Word of God."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron - NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
SUNDAY-
9:45 A.M. Campus Discussion Class: I Car-
irithians 1-5.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon: "How
Wrong Can We Be?" Rev. James Middleton.
6:45 P.M. Student Fellowship: Worship and
discussion on the purpose of the American
Baptist Student Fellowship.i
MONDAY-
8:00P.M. Showing of the Billy Graham film,
"Africa on the Bridge," Fellowship Hall,
followed by discussion led by Dr. Jeffrey
Martin of Easten Michigan University.

cleaner explosives for
ergy.

low cost en- been sent by Kennedy
I the situation.

to surveyl

SIC FLICSI

i

THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church
Rev. Alvin Hoksbergen, pastor.
Every Sunday Nursery Provided.
Two Morning Services: 8:45 A.M. and 11:00
A.M.
Evening 7:00 P.M.

slerf L

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
Church School 10:30 A.M.
Church Service 11:00 A.M.
Sermon: Dialogue entitled "Neighbors U
der the Covenant." The speakers will

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