100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

wO

uTi "( /'Tt"1'n' I"f fT 7F = truer t^r

"rIL MICHUIGAN DAILY ATUz
=r V7 dhNI~rTI1WY l T Ww 1 " °.

JW.AY, O(

Al

I1LI UrY'i vUSE:
SGC Candidates Cite Policies

(Continued from Page 1)
rmal talks between Council
tembers and constituents.
Expresses Confidence
He expressed confidence in the
ewly reorganized administrative
ing to improve communications.,
Sharon Jeffrey. '63, stressed the
eed for elimination of all forms
bigotry and discrimination on
Lmpus. She cited the need of set-
ng deadlines for the submission
membership selection practices
Fsororities and fraternities to
Le OSA.
She also called for an end to
ternalism and non-academic
aluations of all kinds, both in
.e residence halls and in class-

C

Private Groups
Alleen Limburg, '62, said she
does not believe an outside group
has the right to tell a privatel
group such as a fraternity or sor-
ority what criteria it may or may
not use in membership selection..
She said she believes discrim-c
ination will eventually be elimi-
nated on the campus, but does not
think that the University or SGC
has a right to interfere.c
Council President Richard Nohl,,
'62BAd, said SGC 'does not reallyt
have any new issues but rather
must work towards solving old
problems which have been facinge
the group, such as discrimination, C
year-round operation of the Uni-
versity and state appropriationse
for higher education.v
Membership Selection
He said he originally voted
against the motion requiring affil-
iated groups to submit member-
ship selection information to the
OSA because it did not containd
adequate guarantees that the in-a
formation would be kept private. ,
He does believe, however, thatp

it is necessary to set a deadline
for submission of this material.
He also condemned the refusal
of members to debate questions
when they think they have enough
votes to decide the issue as they
wish.
Stanley Lubin, '63, favors Coun-
cil action toward improving the
judiciary system. He believes the
charge "conduct unbecoming a
student' must be narrowed and
clarified and students appearing
before Joint Judiciary Council
should be permitted to bring wit-
nesses and a defense counsel.
Expresses Disapproval
Lubin expressed disapproval of
all forms of discrimination and
supported the idea of non-violent
protests.. ,,
Richard Magidoff, '63, urges es-
tablishment of a student Bill of
Rights which would include re-
vision of the Judiciary system so
that hearings would be conduct-
ed more like civil trials where stu-
dents might bring in witnesses and
counsel. ,
He also called for delineation'
of what constitutes admissible evi-
dence and a redefinition of the
role of Joint Judic in regard to
the deans' offices.
Recent Failure
Incumbent Kenneth McEldown-
ey, '62, expressed concern over the
Council's recent failure to pass
legislation requiring the reporting
out of executive sessions motions,
vote totals and criteria for the.
selection of students to fill ap-
pointive posts.
Fred Riecker ,'63, favors estab-.
lishment of a grievance commit-
tee to hear complaints when stu-
dents believe their rights are
abridged.
He favors Council action to im-{
-- s n P i ~~ ia.Tviee«.i.

i
1

alumni and believes the Council
should consider- an alumni news-
letter.
Free Speech
Robert Ross, '63, said anyone
should be allowed to speak freely
regardless of his ideas..'
In response to a question, he
claimed that it is not the respon-
sibility of the University to "pro-
tect" students from ideologies
which might leave them with an
unfavorable opinion of the United
States government.
Steven Stockmeyer, '63, favors
a time limit on sorority and fra-
ternity submission of membership
selection information. He says it
would be permissible to withdraw
recognition from affiliated groups
if there was direct evidence that
they practiced discrimination.
Fair Time
He said he was not certain what
would constitute a fair time be-
tween proving discrimination and
forcing the group to leave campus.
John Vos, '63, believes that since
students today experience aca-
demic pressures different from
those students faced in the past,
they should be represented on or-
ganizations deciding educational.
questions.
- For example, he said students
should take part in discussions on
implementation of the full year
calendar and should have a voice
in curriculum changes.
Regional NSA.
f olds Session
Over Weekend
The Michigan Region of thej
United States National Student As-!
sociation will hold ,meetings on
campus today and tomorrow.
The convention got underwayj
ast night with delegate registra-
tion, orientation and a showing of
the movie, "Harvest of Shame.",
Meetings today and tomorrow c
will be held in the Student Ac- I
ivities Bldg. and are open to the r
public. A plenary session will be i
held at 9:45 a.m. today in Rm.
3511.
Morning workshops will meet l
rom 10-12 a.m. They will be de- c
voted to: Education in Michigan,
rm. 3532; Campus International $
Projects, rm. 3524; International v
Student Relations, rm. 3516; Mig- e
atory Workers in Michigan, rm. i
510; Student Government Prob-
ems, 3529 and Political and So-
ial Action on Campus, rm. 3545.
The meetings will continue in n
he afternoon after a break from a
2-1 p.m., and will last until 5 t
.m. .

-Daily-Jeffrey Fortune
MUTILATED BOOKS-This display in the lobby of the Under-
graduate Library shows books from which pages have been re-
moved by students. Officials hope the exhibit will create a force
of student opinion to curtail the increase of book mutilation and
loss.
UG LI Sponsors Exhibit
toCr Book M utclatiocn

By MARTHA MacNEAL

prove

contact with Universit~y

1'_

" :
TON IGHT and SUNDAY taat 7 and 9
MY WANDERINGS
Mark Donskoi's_
The Gorky Trilogy, Part 2
SHORT: IN THE PARK
(Marcel Marceau)
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 Cents

1
t
f
t
3
f
v
r
r
3
l
c
t'
1
p
-U-

"The only way that we can hope
to control the mutiliation and loss
of books in University libraries
is through student opinion," Ro-
berta C. Keniston, Librarian of the
Undergraduate Library, said yes-
terday.
Mrs. Keniston explained that
book mutilation and loss of books
have been problems since the
opening of the library, but they
have increased greatly in the last
year.
The display of damaged books
on exhibit in the UGLI lobby
shows a 22-page article on South
Africa torn from the Encyclo-
pedia Brittanica, an 11-page ar-
ticle on the same subject taken
from the Encyclopedia Americana,
a Navy sticker firmly attached to
a page in Roget's Thesaurus, and
many examples of articles removed
from bound volumes of periodicals.
Books Lost
Underscoring is also a diffi-
culty. Most serious, however, is
the fact that 1,977 books were re-
moved without charging and lost
in the last year.
A Regents regulation states that
any student who willfully muti-
ates, defaces, or removes without
charging any items belonging to
University libraries rnay be fined
$100 or expelled from the Uni-
versity. The regulation has been
nforced at least twice, resulting
n one fine and one expulsion.
Students Complain
Mutilation is discovered pri-
rarily on the complaint of stu-
dents seeking the -missing ma-
erial, and when staff members
handle a book and notice that
gages are missing from the bind-
ng. An annual inventory reveals
ook losses. Losses are distributed
'hrough all subjects, and often
'ffect material in great demand.
"The members of the -library
taff make every effort to replace
)st and mutilated material," Mrs.
Keniston said. "But replacement
s extremely costly so there is less
ioney available from the book

I

C Ob1c
ON I '

fund to buy new material for stu-
dent needs, and sometimes we
cannot replace out-of-print works
at all."

---

i

IL.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

w

I

Congreg. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild,
"Scrutinizing Christian Faith," Patri-
cia Pickett, 9:30 a.m.; Evening Guild,
7:30 p.m.; Oct. 29, 802 Monroe.a
* ** v
German Club, Coffee Hour, German
Conversation & Music, Oct. 29, 2-4,
p.m., 4072 FB.

,uiulll"- DIAL NO 2-6264
* STARTING

PLEASE NOTE
FEATURE STARTS
at 1:00-3:00-5:05
7:10 and 9:25
T~ODAY

So much of so many of us are in it...
ELiA KAZAN'S PRODUCTION OF
SPLEND RGRASS
WRITTFN RYWIl I 1AM INGF

q
1
n
n
li
3

s0-
li3
30

c
ao
YW
?q
&1
ie
ga
I
Q,

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY- -
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer. Bob Marshall:
"A Humanist Looks at Historic
Christianity"
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDN ESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAY--
12:10 p.m. Holy Cnmmunion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House. "
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M, 12:00
Noon and 12:30.-
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
'Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.,
NovenadDevotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadiumn at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
- John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister '
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care.

iii

CHRISTIAN REFORMED C-
1131 Church
Rev. Alvin Hoksbergen, pastor.
Every Sunday Nursery Provided.
Two Morning Services: 8:45 A.M.

5.:1 .. 1.s.. ,.Ar. }.. : ......
:....... ..... .. .: ":.. "'.rr. ::'

i

and :

11:fl0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan